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Mega cyclist on Blue Zones and longevity

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Mega cyclist on Blue Zones and longevity

Old 09-04-23, 10:35 AM
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If you do not engage in unhealthy living habits you may live to an old age. But living long is primarily a matter of luck. You are not in control of you genetic makeup, probably the most important factor in living long. There are plenty of people who eat well, get exercise, and are stress free who do not live to very old age. And, by the way, If you die in the end, I'm not sure a few more years of life matter.
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Old 09-04-23, 12:44 PM
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Originally Posted by jackb
If you do not engage in unhealthy living habits you may live to an old age. But living long is primarily a matter of luck. You are not in control of you genetic makeup, probably the most important factor in living long. There are plenty of people who eat well, get exercise, and are stress free who do not live to very old age. And, by the way, If you die in the end, I'm not sure a few more years of life matter.
Luck and random chance always play a role, but, as Louis Pasteur said, "Chance favors only the prepared mind." You can make your own luck, to some extent.
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Old 09-04-23, 03:07 PM
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Originally Posted by John E
Luck and random chance always play a role, but, as Louis Pasteur said, "Chance favors only the prepared mind." You can make your own luck, to some extent.
I agree. You can put yourself in the way of good luck by adopting a healthy lifestyle, but that's about all you can do. Genetics plays a big role in health and longevity. Besides, a healthy lifestyle brings its only daily rewards, such as feeling pretty good.
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Old 09-04-23, 05:42 PM
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Originally Posted by joesch
And avoiding "substance" abuse/use.
Damn. You mean I have to give up my fentinol and heroin habit? Sure kills the pain on long hill climbs.

“Why you think they call it dope?”
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Old 09-04-23, 07:24 PM
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Originally Posted by jackb
If you do not engage in unhealthy living habits you may live to an old age. But living long is primarily a matter of luck. You are not in control of you genetic makeup, probably the most important factor in living long. There are plenty of people who eat well, get exercise, and are stress free who do not live to very old age. And, by the way, If you die in the end, I'm not sure a few more years of life matter.
Actually the genetic scientists say that our genetics only play a relatively small part in our longevity - something like 20%. The other 80% is down to our lifestyle and environment.

Interestingly, for those of us who are fortunate to make it beyond the age of around 85, genetics does then apparently start to play a more dominant role in our longevity - ramping up to something like 50%. I guess that makes sense because we would probably be already dead by then if we had a poor lifestyle.

Last edited by PeteHski; 09-04-23 at 07:32 PM.
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Old 09-05-23, 05:33 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Hermes
I am a follower of Sinclair, like his theory and his research in animals looks promising. Ethically, that is all one can say and he points the same thing out over and over. We are years/decades away from fixing an optic nerve in a human. And his theory, although I like it a lot, is a theory and may be true or lead research in other directions.

I tried MNM and it was BS for me and gave me constipation. And I talked with my cardiologist (who read his book), who uses food as well as exercise as part of her prescriptive arsenal when treating the heart, told me point blank do not use metformin. She said that although metformin may, may work for some people, it will not be good for me since I am an athlete. She was concerned of dropping my blood sugar too low.

As far as calorie restriction, it has been proven to increase the lifespan of rats. We are extremely complicated. Just look at Sinclair. He is skinny with no muscle mass. I believe he walks and does the things that he wants to do and the diet, so far is working for him and his father. I tried intermittent fasting and I lost weight and I rode pretty well. However, it seems that it crashed my hematocrit to a figure appropriate for a female and I got sick (not covid)

So three of Sinclair's ideas did not work for me. I need a lot of food to power my engine and repair muscle damage and etc from riding the bike and working out in the gym.

Having said that, he is the real deal and I would encourage others to follow him and read his book.
I took his book as a laymanís road map of what is to come in the science of aging and major disease prevention and how it will fundamentally impact society. I find it very interesting and Iím fairly optimistic for my kids, at least in terms of the science. The politics not so much!

I donít take NMN or Metformin and I donít do any fasting. I do take regular exercise (well above the minimum recommended amounts, which are actually pretty minimal) and I do eat a lot of plant-based food. But Iím not Vegetarian or Vegan. When I get older (still in my mid 50s today) I may well consider trying NMN or whatever more advanced NAD boosters are available by then. At the moment I hope the exercise and good nutrition is keeping my levels from falling. I donít feel like my energy levels are falling yet.

The only supplement I take is Vit D because we donít get a lot of sun here in the winter. I have also just signed up for the ZOE Nutrition Program, which Iím quite excited about. Iím hoping that will provide some insight into what is actually going on inside my gut.

So really Iím just focusing on exercise, nutrition and health monitoring. I think Sinclairís prediction that real time detailed personal health monitoring will soon become mainstream is getting pretty close to reality. That alone should prevent many premature deaths.
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Old 09-05-23, 06:16 AM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild
The thing about centererians from blue zone areas is that none of them do anything special and try to live to 100 years old. They just go about living a normal daily life eating a normal diet and they don't obsess themselves about performance, FTP, calorie counting, supplements and rigid structured diet and training plans...Meanwhile over here in western countries people are obsesssed with finding a secret to longetivity or some magical diet plan which doesn't even exist.
I think you nailed it. While diet and exercise have been drummed into us here in the States we still are a mess in so many ways. The love to work mentality, crazy portion sized bad food, overweight, over prescribed, less physical interaction with each other and on and on. My grandparents were from Greece and still have family over there. While no means perfect their approach to life seems a little more sane. They do enjoy life’s simple pleasures and live at a pace that’s a bit more healthy I think. While we have much to be proud of here, sometimes I think it comes at a very high price. YMMV, just my opinion.

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Old 09-09-23, 03:19 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
Actually the genetic scientists say that our genetics only play a relatively small part in our longevity - something like 20%. The other 80% is down to our lifestyle and environment.

Interestingly, for those of us who are fortunate to make it beyond the age of around 85, genetics does then apparently start to play a more dominant role in our longevity - ramping up to something like 50%. I guess that makes sense because we would probably be already dead by then if we had a poor lifestyle.
What is a "centererian"? I can see it being a mis-spelling of "centenarian" (= person who reached 100 years old) but how can EVERYBODY be making the same spelling error?
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Old 09-09-23, 06:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Road Fan
What is a "centererian"? I can see it being a mis-spelling of "centenarian" (= person who reached 100 years old) but how can EVERYBODY be making the same spelling error?
Why are you quoting me? I never even used the word.

Anyway, apart from Wolfchild, who else even used that word?

Last edited by PeteHski; 09-09-23 at 06:44 PM.
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Old 09-10-23, 07:45 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by Road Fan
What is a "centererian"? I can see it being a mis-spelling of "centenarian" (= person who reached 100 years old) but how can EVERYBODY be making the same spelling error?
That's a person of the 'Classic & Vintage' persuasion who obsesses over Centurion bicycles, especially those multi-colored varieties produced during the Dave Scott 'Iron Man' years (1980s?).


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Old 09-10-23, 08:06 AM
  #36  
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One opposing few on the Blue Zones (I live near one in Costa Rica) - it might be that these people don't know their age... I know that is true in Nicoya of Cost Rica. The articles talk about how in Nicoya they don't look like they are older than 100 - well probably they aren't. Old people can start increasing their age. (in Costa Rica, birth records were pretty sketchy back that far) I know I am always trying to remember how old I am...

That being said, one thing in Nicoya is the nearest hospital is 3 hours away. People in Nicoya assume if they have a heart attack, they are going to be dead, so I suspect they live not expecting modern medicine to fix their years of neglect.

A lot of those in Nicoya who have lived so long don't have cars or anything motorized. They walk everywhere, or ride a horse. They don't do planned exercise, they just live an active lifestyle. And they enjoy their life, which contributes greatly to living a long life.
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Old 09-11-23, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by 50PlusCycling
Okinawa is one of the Blue Zones. I go to Okinawa frequently to enjoy the beaches. But Okinawa is the most impoverished prefecture in Japan. It has a high percentage of smokers, people drink a lot, pork is the most popular dish, and the region has the highest salt intake in the world. Okinawaís longevity comes from an economically-enforced moderation when it comes to food and vice, and regular physical activity. Okinawa is very much an agricultural and blue-collar economy. People donít go to gyms, and they arenít picky about what they eat.
Okinawa was considered a Blue Zone in 1980, but it has since lost that status because of the influx of junk foods, reduction of exercise in the general populace, and resulting fast declining longevity.

Originally Posted by crtreedude
One opposing few on the Blue Zones (I live near one in Costa Rica) - it might be that these people don't know their age... I know that is true in Nicoya of Cost Rica. The articles talk about how in Nicoya they don't look like they are older than 100 - well probably they aren't. Old people can start increasing their age. (in Costa Rica, birth records were pretty sketchy back that far) I know I am always trying to remember how old I am...
Not at all true. When the Blue Zones were first being established, Buettner and National Geographic extensively audited the ages of the proposed populations. They rejected a number of areas where birth records were considered to be questionable.
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