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new max heart rate

Old 09-20-23, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1
Really? How do you do it? I figured an accurate reading required stuff that was beyond what most of us had readily available with finger pricks and all that.

I think I know what it feels like and in the past have just siad it was where I could carry on a slightly breathless conversation or sing a line, but never tried to use that to assign a number.
LTHR is what I go by. Most of your Garmin devices generate a estimate of it. Other brands might also. And it's been pretty close to what I got back when I did the method recommended by Joe Friel. Though Garmin isn't as friendly about setting up the extra zones that Friel uses. Or at least back then they weren't. I haven't looked lately since I don't get as serious about it anymore.

https://www.trainingpeaks.com/learn/...setting-zones/

This is for setting up both power and HR zones, so make sure you read the one for cycling HR LTHR.

If one doesn't have a known heart condition, then I really fail to understand the fear of trying to get ones HR to max. Your body isn't going to let you ruin your heart through exertion. Might let you eat too much.

Last edited by Iride01; 09-20-23 at 08:38 AM.
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Old 09-20-23, 10:33 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by staehpj1
For those who hesitate to push to max hr to find it... I'd suggest that one could start with the formula and then fudge the settings to get reasonably accurate results by playing with the max hr number until they got % in zones that matched their actual efforts. If you are showing time in the red zone and know you weren't in the red you can assume that your max hr should be set higher. If the opposite is true it should be lower.

I think you could zero in way better than what any of the formulas do.

OTOH, you could just test for max hr
The 220-age formula is around 30 bpm too low for me. Testing max HR is not that hard or painful and probably wonít kill you.
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Old 11-16-23, 02:14 PM
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I've been using a chest strap HRM since around 2004. I trained and raced in 08-09 with the understanding my max HR was 174. Two years ago, at the age of 55, I started to see 182. I may be wrong, but I chock it up to the thousands of miles of low intensity touring I did from 2016 to 2019.
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Old 11-16-23, 07:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Brett A
I've been using a chest strap HRM since around 2004. I trained and raced in 08-09 with the understanding my max HR was 174. Two years ago, at the age of 55, I started to see 182. I may be wrong, but I chock it up to the thousands of miles of low intensity touring I did from 2016 to 2019.
I canít say Iíve heard of anyone increasing their max HR with training or exercise of any kind. Although exercise does appear to reduce the decline in max HR with age. I may be wrong too!
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Old 11-16-23, 07:35 PM
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Well, measuring true 'max HR' isn't easy, there are lots of uncontrolled variables cloud the test. Training or exercise might allow one to get closer to true 'max HR'.
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Old 11-17-23, 03:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Speedskater
Well, measuring true 'max HR' isn't easy, there are lots of uncontrolled variables cloud the test. Training or exercise might allow one to get closer to true 'max HR'.
I disagree, I think itís pretty easy unless you deliberately avoid ever pushing yourself or attempt to measure it when heavily fatigued. Iíve been measuring mine for years (both in training and events) and the uncontrolled variables make zero difference to my maximum recorded HR. Over the past few years I consistently max out at 193 bpm like clockwork. It simply doesnít go any higher and Iíve measured it with multiple HRMs.
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Old 11-17-23, 12:04 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
I disagree, I think itís pretty easy unless you deliberately avoid ever pushing yourself or attempt to measure it when heavily fatigued.
Or when you're highly trained, which can make it quite the challenge to exercise hard enough to max out your heart rate. Something else in your aerobic system usually gives out before your heart. For me, it's my legs.

Personally, I have zero interest in determining my max heart rate. It doesn't reveal anything useful. VO2max and LT heart rates, on the other hand, are useful.
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Old 11-17-23, 12:40 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
I disagree, I think itís pretty easy unless you deliberately avoid ever pushing yourself or attempt to measure it when heavily fatigued. Iíve been measuring mine for years (both in training and events) and the uncontrolled variables make zero difference to my maximum recorded HR. Over the past few years I consistently max out at 193 bpm like clockwork. It simply doesnít go any higher and Iíve measured it with multiple HRMs.
But you are a person that is training and exercising. I'm thinking of people that have not done any demanding activities in decades.
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Old 11-18-23, 06:25 AM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse
Or when you're highly trained, which can make it quite the challenge to exercise hard enough to max out your heart rate. Something else in your aerobic system usually gives out before your heart. For me, it's my legs.

Personally, I have zero interest in determining my max heart rate. It doesn't reveal anything useful. VO2max and LT heart rates, on the other hand, are useful.
😂 What was that Greg Lemond quote again?

Come on, itís easy to hit your HR limiter if you try. It has nothing to do with leg fatigue.
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Old 11-18-23, 06:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Speedskater
But you are a person that is training and exercising. I'm thinking of people that have not done any demanding activities in decades.
Fair enough, I do agree with that.
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Old 11-18-23, 06:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Speedskater
I'm thinking of people that have not done any demanding activities in decades.
That was me 2 years ago and I remember hitting 143 HR and truly fearing I was going to explode and die a la Spegler ->
Originally Posted by spelger
yeah, i suspect if one tried to actually measure their actual maximum heart rate it could very well be the last few beats that heart ever does.
Now 143 is low tempo I can do all day, threshold is 164, and "max" is 181.

My takeaway on this change is; our body's ability to adapt is amazing. And boy howdy, how fast my body adapts to the couch when I stop exercising!

Last edited by BTinNYC; 11-18-23 at 07:01 AM.
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Old 11-18-23, 10:38 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
Come on, it’s easy to hit your HR limiter if you try. It has nothing to do with leg fatigue.
Don't forget that the aerobic system is a system, the heart being just one component.

That's why "max heart rate" is different for different activities, as they each use different muscles.

It's also pretty useless as a measure of fitness, or as a way to set training zones.
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Old 11-18-23, 11:38 AM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse
Don't forget that the aerobic system is a system, the heart being just one component.

That's why "max heart rate" is different for different activities, as they each use different muscles.

It's also pretty useless as a measure of fitness, or as a way to set training zones.
I'm just saying it is easy for me to hit my HR max for cycling. I said nothing about it being a useful measure of fitness. Although it may be useful to know how close your LTHR is to your max HR. For example I know my LTHR is around 180 bpm and my max HR is 193 bpm. So my LTHR is 93% of my max, which suggests I'm a well trained cyclist. I also know when to back off when getting close to my max in competition.

I can easily hit my max HR on a ramp test, VO2 max intervals or toward the end of a series of sprints. It's something that just happens regardless of its usefulness.
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