Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

You're so fit...so has anyone mistaken your age?

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

You're so fit...so has anyone mistaken your age?

Old 11-04-23, 09:32 AM
  #76  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 7,748
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4033 Post(s)
Liked 4,416 Times in 2,742 Posts
Originally Posted by wolfchild
Have you seen the type of lifestyle that some of these longevity experts follow and advocate ?...It's just way too strict, regimented, structured, sheltered, clean and sterile. Unrealistic to follow for majority of people who have to be working out in the real world on daily basis.
Yes I have actually and it is nothing like the bs you have written above.

Now if you happen to be a Colombian coal miner then it could be a challenge to maintain long term health.

Last edited by PeteHski; 11-04-23 at 11:22 AM.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 11-04-23, 09:48 AM
  #77  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 7,748
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4033 Post(s)
Liked 4,416 Times in 2,742 Posts
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
Sure it is possible to put dogma of internet longevity (and other "health" and "fitness") gurus and salesmen into practice. The success of such practices can be psychic if not physical. Browsing the numerous posts of several BF 55+ posters on the subject provides evidence that the gurus, hucksters, and pitchmen for performance enhancement/heath cures have found a responsive audience among some bicycling enthusiasts. The often emotional defense of such promotions, to include ad hominem arguments against rational and skeptical argument, is evidence of the strength of the appeal to ageing bicycling enthusiasts and self described bicycling "athletes" of obtaining "performance" enhancement and/or a return to youthful appearance through chemicals, dietary supplements, and special dietary and "training" regimens, etc.

The bottom line is true believers will believe and no rational argument can convince them otherwise.
You appear to be getting confused between random internet guru bs and actual qualified scientific research. There is a big difference.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 11-04-23, 11:09 AM
  #78  
Grupetto Bob
 
rsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Seattle-ish
Posts: 5,867

Bikes: Bikey McBike Face

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2427 Post(s)
Liked 5,198 Times in 2,716 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski
You are clearly the real deal when it comes to authority on this subject. Never mind science, actual qualifications and experience.
Pete, science was soooo last century. Currently we go with ‘gut’, conspiracy, anecdotal evidence, with a touch of wishful thinking. Not to mention putting down anything we haven’t taken time to research. Time to ketchup to the current ‘standards’. Get ‘real’, geeze.

Unfortunately, or fortunately, I did a 28 mile personal time trial with a measly 500’ of climbing but managed an average speed of 19.6 MPH out and back. However, there were slow downs due to construction and many 90* turns. I follow the tenants of the Mediterranean diet, good sleep, low stress and working out one way or another 6 days a week (dog walks not included). I am not a former racer or have any genetic advantage over anyone else other than good joints. Since next month I will be 69, I can only attribute yesterday’s average speed to obeying the principals to which you and I agree. Full disclosure, I do take 750 mg of Beta Alanine daily which is far below the recommended daily dosage but don’t see it giving me a leg-up (or pedal up) on anyone else. So remember, science is crap, but healthy living is not so much.
__________________
Road 🚴🏾‍♂️ & Mountain 🚵🏾‍♂️







rsbob is offline  
Likes For rsbob:
Old 11-04-23, 11:20 AM
  #79  
Senior Member
 
jadmt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2022
Location: Missoula MT
Posts: 1,746

Bikes: Handsome xoxo, Serotta atx, Canyon Endurace CF8

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 899 Post(s)
Liked 1,823 Times in 823 Posts
Originally Posted by rsbob
Pete, science was soooo last century. Currently we go with ‘gut’, conspiracy, anecdotal evidence, with a touch of wishful thinking. Not to mention putting down anything we haven’t taken time to research. Time to ketchup to the current ‘standards’. Get ‘real’, geeze.

Unfortunately, or fortunately, I did a 28 mile personal time trial with a measly 500’ of climbing but managed an average speed of 19.6 MPH out and back. However, there were slow downs due to construction and many 90* turns. I follow the tenants of the Mediterranean diet, good sleep, low stress and working out one way or another 6 days a week (dog walks not included). I am not a former racer or have any genetic advantage over anyone else other than good joints. Since next month I will be 69, I can only attribute yesterday’s average speed to obeying the principals to which you and I agree. Full disclosure, I do take 750 mg of Beta Alanine daily which is far below the recommended daily dosage but don’t see it giving me a leg-up (or pedal up) on anyone else. So remember, science is crap, but healthy living is not so much.
I do love me some ketchup. I pretty much go through it by the case. I put ketchup on almost everything but ice cream. I wonder if you downed a bottle of beer during that 28 mile ride if you would have broken 20mph? serious question. People discount the notion of the potion of beer but it kind of is the perfect food for endurance sports.
jadmt is offline  
Old 11-04-23, 11:36 AM
  #80  
climber has-been
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 6,787

Bikes: Scott Addict R1, Felt Z1

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3159 Post(s)
Liked 3,238 Times in 1,639 Posts
Originally Posted by rsbob
Unfortunately, or fortunately, I did a 28 mile personal time trial with a measly 500’ of climbing but managed an average speed of 19.6 MPH out and back. However, there were slow downs due to construction and many 90* turns. I follow the tenants of the Mediterranean diet, good sleep, low stress and working out one way or another 6 days a week (dog walks not included). I am not a former racer or have any genetic advantage over anyone else other than good joints. Since next month I will be 69, I can only attribute yesterday’s average speed to obeying the principals to which you and I agree. Full disclosure, I do take 750 mg of Beta Alanine daily which is far below the recommended daily dosage but don’t see it giving me a leg-up (or pedal up) on anyone else. So remember, science is crap, but healthy living is not so much.
Diet, sleep, stress management, exercise?

Geez, man. You'll never get anywhere with the only methods that have ever been shown to be effective.

(Congrats on the time trial -- an impressive pace)

Edit: On the subject of this thread, when I'm kitted up and on the bike, wearing helmet and dark glasses, I seem to attract the attention of women of a certain age (let's call them "moms"). Not sure what that means. Maybe they're thinking, "He's so thin, I should make him a sandwich".
__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat

Zwift: Terry Morse [OldAF]
ROUVY: terrymorse






Last edited by terrymorse; 11-04-23 at 11:48 AM.
terrymorse is offline  
Old 11-04-23, 11:56 AM
  #81  
Grupetto Bob
 
rsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Seattle-ish
Posts: 5,867

Bikes: Bikey McBike Face

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2427 Post(s)
Liked 5,198 Times in 2,716 Posts
Originally Posted by terrymorse
Diet, sleep, stress management, exercise?

Geez, man. You'll never get anywhere with the only methods that have ever been shown to be effective.

(Congrats on the time trial -- an impressive pace)

Edit: On the subject of this thread, when I'm kitted up and on the bike, wearing helmet and dark glasses, I seem to attract the attention of women of a certain age (let's call them "moms"). Not sure what that means. Maybe they're thinking, "He's so thin, I should make him a sandwich".
I get the same treatment until they see my aging face. Time for a full face mask.
__________________
Road 🚴🏾‍♂️ & Mountain 🚵🏾‍♂️







rsbob is offline  
Likes For rsbob:
Old 11-04-23, 12:01 PM
  #82  
climber has-been
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 6,787

Bikes: Scott Addict R1, Felt Z1

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3159 Post(s)
Liked 3,238 Times in 1,639 Posts
Originally Posted by rsbob
I get the same treatment until they see my aging face. Time for a full face mask.
Helmets with face shields -- they're not just aero. They hide your face!
__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat

Zwift: Terry Morse [OldAF]
ROUVY: terrymorse





terrymorse is offline  
Old 11-04-23, 12:08 PM
  #83  
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 29,912

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked 1,495 Times in 1,018 Posts
Originally Posted by jadmt
double whooper with cheese, whooper jr, onion rings and large chocolate shake chased by a frozen coke...I ate 10 mcdonald cheese burgers once....my buddy ate 20. true story, after 10 I was done..he had eaten like 15 of them and let out a groan and I started laughing and he looked at me shook his head and polished off the other 5, called me an amature. That was after running the Seattle Marathon.
I was visiting my brother in Chicago for a week in the early 70's and brought my Raleigh 3 speed with me. I rode to Wrigley from his home to see the Cubs vs. the Phillies and decided to have a beer and hot dog every inning. The game went 11 innings. Thank goodness back then the refreshments were reasonably priced. After the game I had no problem riding back to his home in Park Ridge. I may have been a bit slower than normal, but then as now, I wasn't measuring my "performance", nor making every ride into some sort of competitive challenge or achievement objective.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 11-04-23, 12:11 PM
  #84  
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 29,912

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked 1,495 Times in 1,018 Posts
Originally Posted by terrymorse
Edit: On the subject of this thread, when I'm kitted up and on the bike, wearing helmet and dark glasses, I seem to attract the attention of women of a certain age (let's call them "moms"). Not sure what that means. Maybe they're thinking, "He's so thin, I should make him a sandwich".
Just the women?
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Likes For I-Like-To-Bike:
Old 11-04-23, 12:14 PM
  #85  
climber has-been
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 6,787

Bikes: Scott Addict R1, Felt Z1

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3159 Post(s)
Liked 3,238 Times in 1,639 Posts
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
Just the women?
Yeah, I don't think the fellas are interested at all. My gaydar is inoperative.
__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat

Zwift: Terry Morse [OldAF]
ROUVY: terrymorse





terrymorse is offline  
Old 11-04-23, 01:58 PM
  #86  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 7,748
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4033 Post(s)
Liked 4,416 Times in 2,742 Posts
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
I was visiting my brother in Chicago for a week in the early 70's and brought my Raleigh 3 speed with me. I rode to Wrigley from his home to see the Cubs vs. the Phillies and decided to have a beer and hot dog every inning. The game went 11 innings. Thank goodness back then the refreshments were reasonably priced. After the game I had no problem riding back to his home in Park Ridge. I may have been a bit slower than normal, but then as now, I wasn't measuring my "performance", nor making every ride into some sort of competitive challenge or achievement objective.
So that’s great that you challenged yourself to consume 11 beers and hotdogs. But I presume nobody is insisting that you measure your bike performance in any way, shape or form?
PeteHski is offline  
Old 11-04-23, 02:56 PM
  #87  
Senior Member
 
jadmt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2022
Location: Missoula MT
Posts: 1,746

Bikes: Handsome xoxo, Serotta atx, Canyon Endurace CF8

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 899 Post(s)
Liked 1,823 Times in 823 Posts
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
I was visiting my brother in Chicago for a week in the early 70's and brought my Raleigh 3 speed with me. I rode to Wrigley from his home to see the Cubs vs. the Phillies and decided to have a beer and hot dog every inning. The game went 11 innings. Thank goodness back then the refreshments were reasonably priced. After the game I had no problem riding back to his home in Park Ridge. I may have been a bit slower than normal, but then as now, I wasn't measuring my "performance", nor making every ride into some sort of competitive challenge or achievement objective.
impressive feat no doubt.
jadmt is offline  
Old 11-04-23, 05:01 PM
  #88  
Made it to 84 WHOOPIE
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 399
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 181 Post(s)
Liked 491 Times in 153 Posts
A recent on-going study by the University of California, Irvine, of "super agers" - those in their 80s, 90s and 100+who are doing extremely well cognitively showed 7 characteristics common to these folks:
1. Control of BP and Blood sugar
2. Communicating/talking with friends - a lot.
3. Avoiding stress and prioritizing mental health
4. Prioritizing sleep
5. Protecting vision and hearing
6. Pushing theselves vigorously in exercising
7. Read, listen to music, lectures, concerts, travel - variety. Wordle and Sudoko won't do it.
Also, genetics may have an important part to play. Super agers seem to run in families. Using MRIs, post- mortem and other techniques, they have identified that some brains have more "cognitive reserve" than others.
I have summarized from a lengthy article by AARP (several pages). True, not a "scientific" journal, but based on some good research. I have several in my family and relatives who qualify as "super agers" - but I doubt I will make ti. At 84, I hope I do, also! AARP Bulletin, November 2023

Last edited by gobicycling; 11-04-23 at 06:10 PM.
gobicycling is offline  
Likes For gobicycling:
Old 11-04-23, 08:04 PM
  #89  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 7,748
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4033 Post(s)
Liked 4,416 Times in 2,742 Posts
Originally Posted by gobicycling
A recent on-going study by the University of California, Irvine, of "super agers" - those in their 80s, 90s and 100+who are doing extremely well cognitively showed 7 characteristics common to these folks:
1. Control of BP and Blood sugar
2. Communicating/talking with friends - a lot.
3. Avoiding stress and prioritizing mental health
4. Prioritizing sleep
5. Protecting vision and hearing
6. Pushing theselves vigorously in exercising
7. Read, listen to music, lectures, concerts, travel - variety. Wordle and Sudoko won't do it.
Also, genetics may have an important part to play. Super agers seem to run in families. Using MRIs, post- mortem and other techniques, they have identified that some brains have more "cognitive reserve" than others.
I have summarized from a lengthy article by AARP (several pages). True, not a "scientific" journal, but based on some good research. I have several in my family and relatives who qualify as "super agers" - but I doubt I will make ti. At 84, I hope I do, also! AARP Bulletin, November 2023
This is more or less in line with what I’ve read recently. Genetics appears to become the dominant factor in longevity beyond the age of around 85 IIRC. Below that it’s more about lifestyle. Hopefully you got dealt a good hand!
PeteHski is offline  
Old 11-04-23, 10:09 PM
  #90  
Made it to 84 WHOOPIE
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 399
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 181 Post(s)
Liked 491 Times in 153 Posts
https://www.cnn.com/2023/07/13/healt...Dsharp%20minds.
gobicycling is offline  
Likes For gobicycling:
Old 11-05-23, 04:26 AM
  #91  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 7,748
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4033 Post(s)
Liked 4,416 Times in 2,742 Posts
Originally Posted by gobicycling
Interesting study. From what I’ve read it would appear that there is plenty we can do in midlife to significantly reduce our risk of developing dementia in later life, even if we have the known genetic dispositions toward it.

Peter Attia’s book “Outlive” discusses this in some detail. I also recently watched an interesting Netflix documentary series about the lifestyle of very old people living in the Blue Zones. Mental health was a key factor there too, along with exercise, diet etc.

From your linked article:-

“SuperAgers share similar traits, say experts who study them. They tend to be positive. They challenge their brain every day, reading or learning something new. Many continue to work into their 80s.”

Last edited by PeteHski; 11-05-23 at 04:32 AM.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 11-05-23, 09:52 AM
  #92  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Los Alamitos, Calif.
Posts: 2,469

Bikes: Trek 7.4 FX

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1018 Post(s)
Liked 898 Times in 525 Posts
moisturize, moisturize, moisturize
TakingMyTime is offline  
Likes For TakingMyTime:
Old 11-05-23, 10:39 AM
  #93  
Grupetto Bob
 
rsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Seattle-ish
Posts: 5,867

Bikes: Bikey McBike Face

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2427 Post(s)
Liked 5,198 Times in 2,716 Posts
Originally Posted by TakingMyTime
moisturize, moisturize, moisturize
__________________
Road 🚴🏾‍♂️ & Mountain 🚵🏾‍♂️







rsbob is offline  
Old 11-05-23, 02:55 PM
  #94  
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
Posts: 8,721

Bikes: I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4227 Post(s)
Liked 2,482 Times in 1,284 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski
Yes I have actually and it is nothing like the bs you have written above.

Now if you happen to be a Colombian coal miner then it could be a challenge to maintain long term health.
Not a coal miner but I've spent the last 27 years working in metal fabricating and the amount of metal dust, welding fumes, paint fumes, solvent fumes that I am being exposed to on daily basis is just crazy. Yes I use PPE sometimes but not all the time. That's one of the reasons why I enjoy cycling so much, it's an opportunity to get fresh air and clean my system out of all the crap.
wolfchild is offline  
Likes For wolfchild:
Old 11-05-23, 05:43 PM
  #95  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 24,893
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8067 Post(s)
Liked 8,646 Times in 4,305 Posts
Originally Posted by wolfchild
Not a coal miner but I've spent the last 27 years working in metal fabricating and the amount of metal dust, welding fumes, paint fumes, solvent fumes that I am being exposed to on daily basis is just crazy. Yes I use PPE sometimes but not all the time. That's one of the reasons why I enjoy cycling so much, it's an opportunity to get fresh air and clean my system out of all the crap.
Have you heard about metal dust being linked to ALS? I don't know if there is anything conclusive.
big john is offline  
Old 11-05-23, 06:35 PM
  #96  
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
Posts: 8,721

Bikes: I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4227 Post(s)
Liked 2,482 Times in 1,284 Posts
Originally Posted by big john
Have you heard about metal dust being linked to ALS? I don't know if there is anything conclusive.

ALS is of genetic origin....I've heard that aluminum may cause Alzheimers but scientific research hasn't been able to prove that 100%..
I do wear a dust mask when grinding and polishing aluminum but I hardly ever wear a dust mask when I work with stainless steel or mild steel...Paint and solvents don't seem to bother me at all. I do wear a respirator when spraying paint but it's never100% , I can always smell some paint fumes.
wolfchild is offline  
Likes For wolfchild:
Old 11-05-23, 06:45 PM
  #97  
Senior Member
 
jadmt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2022
Location: Missoula MT
Posts: 1,746

Bikes: Handsome xoxo, Serotta atx, Canyon Endurace CF8

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 899 Post(s)
Liked 1,823 Times in 823 Posts
Originally Posted by TakingMyTime
moisturize, moisturize, moisturize
I did that today riding in the rain...
jadmt is offline  
Old 11-05-23, 06:51 PM
  #98  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 24,893
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8067 Post(s)
Liked 8,646 Times in 4,305 Posts
Originally Posted by wolfchild
ALS is of genetic origin....I've heard that aluminum may cause Alzheimers but scientific research hasn't been able to prove that 100%..
I do wear a dust mask when grinding and polishing aluminum but I hardly ever wear a dust mask when I work with stainless steel or mild steel...Paint and solvents don't seem to bother me at all. I do wear a respirator when spraying paint but it's never100% , I can always smell some paint fumes.
ALS can reasonably be considered a multifactorial disease, in which the interaction between genetic background and external factors is thought to play major role.

From this page:
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and environmental factors - PMC (nih.gov)

I brought it up because someone I know was a metal fabricator and the doctors discussed this with him when he was diagnosed. They told him Lou Gehrig's father was a metal worker and often took Lou to work with him when he was a kid.
big john is offline  
Old 11-05-23, 08:21 PM
  #99  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 824
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 470 Post(s)
Liked 329 Times in 257 Posts
Originally Posted by wolfchild
Not a coal miner but I've spent… Yes I use PPE sometimes but not all the time. That's one of the reasons why I enjoy cycling so much, it's an opportunity to get fresh air and clean my system out of all the crap.
Ability to smell at least certain things that are decidedly harmful to our health, is also linked to our genetics. For example, some people are unable to smell hydrocyanic acid but most people can smell it. Just because some people cannot smell it, doesn’t mean they are impervious to the deadly affects of HCN. Some/many organic solvents are not, shall we say, good for your health! Because the effects of some solvents are not immediate on your health, it may not be obvious. Of course, compounds that take many years to show obvious damage, tend to go unnoticed for a long time. The industry that is benefiting from a direct and unequivocal link of harm tends to perpetuate the doubt and confusion about cause and effect. Cigarette industry is a good example.
There was a time when benzene and carbon terta chloride were commonly used as solvents, the former proved to be a carcinogen, and latter causes serious liver damage as well as tumors in liver. Less toxic solvents often cause lung inflammation and other damages which may end up resulting in lung fibrosis… depending on the nature of solvents, their dose and frequency of exposure.
If I were in your situation, I would definitely use an appropriate respirator while using solvents.

Last edited by Alan K; 11-05-23 at 08:47 PM. Reason: Clarity
Alan K is offline  
Likes For Alan K:
Old 11-06-23, 11:12 AM
  #100  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 7,748
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4033 Post(s)
Liked 4,416 Times in 2,742 Posts
Originally Posted by wolfchild
Not a coal miner but I've spent the last 27 years working in metal fabricating and the amount of metal dust, welding fumes, paint fumes, solvent fumes that I am being exposed to on daily basis is just crazy. Yes I use PPE sometimes but not all the time. That's one of the reasons why I enjoy cycling so much, it's an opportunity to get fresh air and clean my system out of all the crap.
My father spent most of his working life as a metal worker and I don't think they had much in the way of PPE back in his day. Health issues first started to appear in retirement when he developed a chronic cough. Nothing too serious, but he was always clearing his throat. A bit like a smoker, but he never smoked which probably saved him a much worse fate. He made it to 79 before heart disease finally caught up with him. I doubt that was linked to his work and was probably more the result of a sedentary retirement. In his prime he was an elite level tennis player and super fit. But like most people of his generation he let his fitness go in midlife.
PeteHski is offline  
Likes For PeteHski:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.