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Taking an easy relaxing ride is more painful than doing a Strenuous ride!

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Taking an easy relaxing ride is more painful than doing a Strenuous ride!

Old 06-08-24, 03:23 PM
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Taking an easy relaxing ride is more painful than doing a Strenuous ride!

I'm having issues with overtraining. fatigue back pain and I'm not getting any younger, so a few days ago I hung up my racing bike and got out my gravel bike. I lowered the seat and the tire pressure to make it a nice comfy ride.
LOL it's actually harder to ride this way? My butt hurts because before ny weight was on the drop bars with seat set so high. Also churning away on a small chain ring and big cog seems less efficient. The biggest thing was my butt really hurt!
Maybe it'll take some practice. I see some older people riding to the shopping center with their baskets and they look like they are having a lot of fun.
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Old 06-08-24, 03:55 PM
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Cool.
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Old 06-08-24, 04:35 PM
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I find all the things which make a comfortable neighborhood bike make for an uncomfortable long distance/performance bike. Sitting upright on a wide padded seat is great for going to the grocery store or park, but the longer I ride, the less comfortable it gets. Road bikes are based on competition machines, which are used for longer distance riding. That mean there must be something inherently comfortable about the low riding position, even if it doesn’t look obvious. A combination of better weight distribution between the upper and lower body, and decreased wind resistance from a lower body position makes rides less tiring.
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Old 06-08-24, 05:35 PM
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Just this year I stopped riding my road bike and switched to a very comfortable hybrid, adjusted for a complete upright position. I did it because I had to. At 75 my long-standing spine issues now involved my neck when I rode on the drops, or even the hoods. Thing is, before this I not only found a road bike position on the drops efficient and powerful, I also felt most comfortable on the drops. But not anymore. I first tried changing the stem to a more upright position and it helped, but not enough. So, I bought a hybrid.

The neck pain was immediately gone, but every other part of me was uncomfortable, especially my bum. I stayed with it because I had no choice, but I also kept adjusting things. The seat post height, the seat tilt, the seat fore and aft, the stem angle, the angle of the bars, the position of the shifters and brakes, the seat, etc. It took a long time actually because the feel on the bike was very different from a road bike, but I finally got it sorted out and now it is extremely comfortable. I am doing 20-30 mile rides 6 days a week in complete comfort. It is not as fast of course, and I do not look as cool as I did in my imagination, but I am enjoying riding again. Not the kind of fun you get from speed but fun, nonetheless. I guess my point is you may need to find an entirely different fitting of the bike to enjoy it and just a few mods to your road bike might not work.
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Old 06-08-24, 06:43 PM
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Maybe you should get a single speed cruiser bike - like the ones seen at the beach. They have a wide seat and upright bars. You sit on your behind, taking the pressure off your hands, neck etc.
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Old 06-08-24, 06:58 PM
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When riders are going fast, with a lot of pedal force, that takes pressure off the saddle. More weight is supported by the legs.
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Old 06-08-24, 07:02 PM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
Maybe you should get a single speed cruiser bike - like the ones seen at the beach. They have a wide seat and upright bars. You sit on your behind, taking the pressure off your hands, neck etc.
I ride the local bike share bikes. A choice of human powered, or e-bikes. They have that fat cushioned saddle, upright bars, and an extremely stable geometry, stable at very low speeds.
It's fine for short trips, which is what these are designed for. But very uncomfortable for 30+ minute rides.

A drop bar bike with handlebars with tops almost level with the saddle would let a rider use the hoods and the drops. My fast road bike's handlebar tops are just 1.5 inches below the saddle, so the drops are very nice and I use them along with the hood position.

At 70 years old, I do notice a bit of neck discomfort after the 45 mile rides. But it's not a big annoyance so far.
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Old 06-08-24, 08:31 PM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
Maybe you should get a single speed cruiser bike - like the ones seen at the beach. They have a wide seat and upright bars. You sit on your behind, taking the pressure off your hands, neck etc.
You're not far off. But please not single speed, LOL. We got hills out here in Western Washington, even the flat roads have hills .
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Old 06-08-24, 08:32 PM
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Originally Posted by AJW2W11E
You're not far off. But please not single speed, LOL. We got hills out here in Western Washington, even the flat roads have hills .
I will need to visit western Washington on of these days. I understand it is quite beautiful. 😍
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Old 06-09-24, 06:01 AM
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Just rode 23.32 miles this morning on my 84yo neighbor's purchased new gifted to me 1982 DAHON Fold-Up 20" wheel 40+ pound 6spd. SIS 14/28 with an added by me 60tooth chainring plus aerobars wide/cushioned/dual spring saddle.

A non stop 13.5mph average speed slow and easy enjoyable alternating between upright and aerobars. Have hit 29.2mph a few weeks ago as well as a 50 miler on it. Just have to make the bike work for you by adapting it to your style.

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Old 06-09-24, 07:18 AM
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Originally Posted by OldTryGuy
Just rode 23.32 miles this morning on my 84yo neighbor's purchased new gifted to me 1982 DAHON Fold-Up 20" wheel 40+ pound 6spd. SIS 14/28 with an added by me 60tooth chainring plus aerobars wide/cushioned/dual spring saddle.

A non stop 13.5mph average speed slow and easy enjoyable alternating between upright and aerobars. Have hit 29.2mph a few weeks ago as well as a 50 miler on it. Just have to make the bike work for you by adapting it to your style.
What is an "SIS 14/28"?
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Old 06-09-24, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by spinconn
What is an "SIS 14/28"?
*SIS stands for Shimano Indexed Shifting, which means one shift per click to allow you to change through gears quickly..... * ---- simply the 1980's jargon for non-friction shifting with a 14/28 - 6 cog freewheel

Last edited by OldTryGuy; 06-09-24 at 12:21 PM.
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Old 06-14-24, 11:16 PM
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Tires should be wide enough to provide a smooth ride. Depending on surface that could be 28mm to 45mm. Wider than necessary isn't really helpful IMO. Wide low pressure cheap tires are like riding pulling a plow. Even that can be okay if you gear way down and don't go very far.

Have you adjusted your speed expectations, to align with the new attitude? If not, this is a problem to solve. Miles per hour is not relevant.

If your butt hurts during a ride, get off the bike for a bit. It'll be fine.
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Old 06-15-24, 04:20 AM
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Sounds like a bike fit issue to me. I have many bikes which are all comfy but for different terrain. Oddly enough I am faster on certain roads (confirmed by strava) on my gravel bike with 47mm tires than my road bike with 28mm wide tires and deep carbon wheels. FWIW I fit all the bikes myself and they took a very long time to get right. My newest gravel bike only has 1000 km now and it is almost perfect for me.
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Old 06-15-24, 05:30 AM
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I notice back and neck pain when I ride slower than my normal pace, even on the same bike. I've been wondering why, and I like the idea about the legs taking more of the weight when riding faster. And maybe balance, posture, and constant small movements are different at a slower speed.
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Old 06-15-24, 06:11 AM
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Originally Posted by AJW2W11E
I'm having issues with overtraining. fatigue back pain and I'm not getting any younger
In my admittedly strange head, I think overtraining has some mental blowback too. I do not mean your back pain is imagined! I just remember the times I really overtrained I had some bad ideas about cycling and training.

I hope you raise that stem a bit and get better.
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Old 06-15-24, 07:53 AM
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Ride the bike that fits you best less often.
When you changed a good position on the gravel bike - what better 'good' did you expect?

Overtraining is not fixed with riding in a different position, duh. Ride less, get a new hobby.
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Old 06-15-24, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
I will need to visit western Washington on of these days. I understand it is quite beautiful. 😍
AC or DC?
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Old 06-15-24, 11:37 AM
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Why would you lower the seat? That's just a recipe for lower efficiency and less comfort since your legs will no longer be in the most efficient position relative to the pedals and because your butt will now be supporting much of the weight that your legs were helping support previously. The height of the seat stays the same on my various bikes even though other aspects (seat fore-aft position, stem length and height, handlebar type) may change to accommodate different riding environments.

If your racing bike was giving you back pain then the first thing I would look at is whether it was properly fit to your body. There are plenty of articles about how to DIY this but perhaps you would benefit from an experienced professional doing this for you.

As far as gearing is concerned, you should always shift to a gear that gives you a good cadence, say 60 to 90 rpm, no matter what terrain you are on and what kind of bike you are riding.
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Old 06-15-24, 12:49 PM
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I've got 9 bikes, I'm trying hard to get away from N+1 but I succumbed to it again early this spring when I found a like new steel Raleigh C30 . Every style bike is different and needs to be set up to fit you individually. I also find a steady cadence works best for me
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Old 06-15-24, 08:37 PM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
I will need to visit western Washington on of these days. I understand it is quite beautiful. 😍
Oh baby, you have a treat in store for you! OMG, there is riding out here that's world class. We still have actual rural roads, light traffic on the weekend, ride anywhere except for major roads and highways and love it. I have over 100 routes just out of Redmond. Then there's riding in the mountains, especially the North Cascades (highway 20) and Mt. Rainier NP. I can send you fave RWGPS routes.
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Old 06-22-24, 06:29 AM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
I will need to visit western Washington on of these days. I understand it is quite beautiful. 😍
Iíve done the westernmost section of ACAís Northern Tier route twice. Included the North Cascades Highway. Rest day in Winthrop. Then Loup Loup, Wacunda and Sherman Passes the next 3 consecutive days. Nice riding.
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Old 06-22-24, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz
Iíve done the westernmost section of ACAís Northern Tier route twice. Included the North Cascades Highway. Rest day in Winthrop. Then Loup Loup, Wacunda and Sherman Passes the next 3 consecutive days. Nice riding.
I did the Northern Tier as well and loved the North Cascades Highway.
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Old 06-22-24, 03:40 PM
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Back pain isn't overtraining, it's undertraining your core. You don't need to get fancy, but take some of that saddle time and do some core exercises. e.g., planks.
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Old 06-23-24, 05:13 PM
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Originally Posted by 50PlusCycling
Road bikes are based on competition machines, which are used for longer distance riding. That mean there must be something inherently comfortable about the low riding position, even if it doesnít look obvious. A combination of better weight distribution between the upper and lower body, and decreased wind resistance from a lower body position makes rides less tiring.
That is my experience. Having rehabbed my drop bar bike with a new tire, better wheels and a new SS freewheel, Iím realizing just how suited that bike and riding position are to hard cycling work. Iím not sure itís comfortable, but at least itís not uncomfortable. For me itís also the benefit of less weight on the saddle and more on the pedals and bars.

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