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Uh, is this some kind of new trend?

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Uh, is this some kind of new trend?

Old 07-30-06, 05:53 PM
  #1  
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Uh, is this some kind of new trend?

I was going to post this in advocacy, but I don't think the 20-somethings would understand the question. So here I am with it.

I was taught to ride by my father. His method was simple enough: Once I learned to balance and ride short distances, (I never had training wheels) It was time for real riding. My father rode with my sister and me. He rode behind us, on his Raleigh 3 speed, the most popular bike for adults in the 60's. (click-click-click,,,) He made sure we understood that we were to ride on the right, and stop for stop signs and red lights. (Or else!) On occasion, my grandfather would join us, on his BSA bicycle, that looked enormous to me. Anyway, that's how I learned. I'll take a guess that most folks posting here learned in a similar fashion. This is the way everyone learned to ride back then, accompanied by a riding adult, or perhaps an older brother. (Elementary schools also had bicycle safety education in classes back then, but that is another topic)

A few years ago, I saw something I thought was bizarre: A mini-van, moving along very slowly, and well over to the right, hugging the curb. A woman was screeching from the passenger window. What the heck was this all about? Then I saw that she was yelling at a young girl, riding a bike on the sidewalk. I thought this was about the laziest, dumbest thing I had ever seen, but I thought it was just a fluke. Surely, there was no one else dumb enough to do this.

But, no. So far this summer, I have seen this replayed three times. First, a woman driving a Sube Forrester is yelling to a boy who was struggling with a bike on the sidewalk. I could not make out what she was saying, but she was quite angry. The boy, probably about 6, looked miserable.

The Second was a woman in one of those little Toyota SUV's. (I don't even know what half these things are called.) She yelling from the driver's seat, at a young boy, who is pedaling along on the sidwalk. He's definitely not enjoying himself. Oh yes, in the back of this vehicle is a teenaged girl, who looked either stoned, or totally dis-interested in pretty much everything. I figured her for an older sister.

Today came the grand prize: Along a side street I sometimes use, comes a Chevy Suburban. In it is the perfect, ultra-yuppie couple. The passenger window is open, and the Chevy is moving so close to the sidewalk that its tires are rubbing the curb. It's following a young girl, riding on the sidewalk. At least she does not look as unhappy as the last one. Mom (looks like a Mattell Barbie) Says something, and does something with her hands. She then says "Just like we talked about now, OK?"

I rode for about another three hours. A good riding day today, with a seabreeze providing a nice cooling effect. Now, I must ask: Is this the latest trend? What the heck is going on here? Are parents today so lazy and so moronic, that they cannot even take ride with the kiddies?
It seems that this will simply enforce the idea that "bicycles are toys for children, adults ride around in cars" mentality.

What do you think? ( and sorry for the rant, but I had to unload this.)
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Old 07-30-06, 06:21 PM
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Originally Posted by trackhub
"Bicyclists must drive like other vehicles if they are to be taken seriously by motorists" Quote from the Utah state driver's license manual.
Gosh, I hope not. Given how drivers drive their vehicles around here, bicyclists would all be dead!

I would offer the following:

Bicyclists must drive better than other vehicles if they are to be taken seriously by motorists and stay alive."

As regards the 3 folks teaching their kids to bicycle while driving, all I can say is sad.

Fortunately, I have never seen this around here.
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Old 07-30-06, 06:48 PM
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That IS sad. I taught mine the old fashioned (and tiring) way - run alongside the bike, gradually let go, grab on if needed, let go again, encourage, encourage, encourage, and finally -- let 'em rip! Then when they got the hang of it, off we'd go on two bikes, and they'd learn the rules of the road.
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Old 07-30-06, 06:55 PM
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My two kids learned to ride by doing circles in a nearby cul-de-sac. They thought they had truly graduated when they could take off down the street in a straight line. (Turning constantly seemed to help them with balance rather than trying to go straight.)

For me, there seems a fine balance between being assertive in traffic-- getting eye contact, holding a line and being predictable, not being so passive you invite game-playing from drivers, etc-- and being sensible of your vulnerability and the need to be more cautious and alert than the guy in the multi-ton Tahoe talking on his cell.
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Old 07-30-06, 07:11 PM
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My mom and dad didn't ride with me - we lived on a farm. They showed me how, I rode in our lane - a half mile circle with another quarter mile spur to the road.

I taught my kids to ride in a school parking lot - we graduated to the shopping center parking lot during off hours, and then, when they were ready, just as you describe - them up front, me riding interference and support from the rear.

The scene you describe sounds bizarre - perhaps there is some explanation, but I cannot think of one.

Caruso
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Old 07-30-06, 07:13 PM
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I remember running alongside of the bike holding on the the back, and then letting go and running beside them. It was a blast to see their face when they realized that I was not holding them up anymore.
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Old 07-30-06, 07:14 PM
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Like Dee Gee I ran behind all 4 of my kids, holding on letting go, faking to hold on and then getting out of the way so they could go on their own. Definitely a more tiring way then riding next to them in the car but much more interactive and personal.
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Old 07-30-06, 07:53 PM
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I am trying to visualize a Hummer, driver hugging a curb and coaching a kid to learn biking.....Hmm....??...!!!!
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Old 07-30-06, 08:09 PM
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Poor little guys

Another example of people sucking the joy out of life. Learning to ride should be fun and there should be celebration when a child is able to do it. One of my fondest memories: Grandpa's long front driveway. He's holding onto the back of my two-wheeler (and my folks bought it NEW - I think my siblings still resent that!) and he's just removed the training wheels. I'm gaining speed...now we're really rolling. I turn around to tell Grandpa how much fun I'm having -- and he's all the way at the end of the driveway waving! That was immediately followed by my first wipeout, come to think of it. But, man, it was so cool!!
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Old 07-30-06, 08:29 PM
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Well, all is NOT lost. Just two days ago on my local ride, there was Mom and Pop, Mom with young child in a bike seat (behind Mom,) two children riding, (one barley), and one in trainers. I slowed down and talked with them for a minute, did my heart good!
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Old 07-30-06, 09:09 PM
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This thread reminds me of the time I was next to a woman at a horse show. As her daughter rode by us in the ring she yelled at her daughter (maybe 12-14?)......."we're not doing this for fun you know!"

WTF ? Poor kid.
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Old 07-31-06, 06:28 AM
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Nine years ago when my daughter was four, she wanted to ride a "big girl" bike and she had a hard time without the training wheels. We worked every day for a week and she just couldn't bring her feet off the ground to the pedals and let gravity and balance connect. Then a nephew, who worked at a LBS suggested to me to take the pedals off and raise the seat so that her feet were just flat on the ground. "Let her push herself around on a level place," he suggested. "When you notice she his holding her feet off the ground and drifting on a slight down hill, install the pedals." A day later she could ride her "big girl" bike.

Now, if I could only teach her how to friction shift the 18 speed vintage MTB I've set up for her. But you all know, you can't tell an 8th grader anything, especially when she is your daughter!
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Old 07-31-06, 07:15 AM
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Trackhub, that is just another example of the sad state of parenting. Overscheduled, overprotected, and overpressured kids with little or no free time to play and explore on their own, parents thinking that "activities" and dubious techology (like the "Baby Einstein" stuff) are replacements for their time and involvement.

You should send that in to the local papers.
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Old 07-31-06, 08:20 AM
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I taught my kids by taking the pedals off the bike and making sure that their feet could reach the ground. This way they could push themselves along without worrying about the pedals. If memory serves me correctly it was about 20 minutes of this before they wanted the pedals put back on, "like a real bike". Both learned the basic balance and pedal routine in one afternoon.

While the story you tell is quite disturbing, there are several positive elements to it. At least the kids did get a bike, while many kids where I live never do. While the parents were involved in a rather dysfunctional or maladaptive way, at least they were doing something with their kids. I can't tell you the number of families I know where parental involvement is a non-reality. Finally, (I'm only kidding here) the kids are learning an important lesson that all cyclist must learn.... never trust someone in a car.
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Old 07-31-06, 10:04 AM
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Since kids learn by emulating their parents, there is no substitute for bicycling with your kids, as I did with both of my boys.
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Old 07-31-06, 05:29 PM
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Thank you all for "Sharing a good venting" with me. I just cannot believe people are doing this.

Probably the dumbest thing I have seen ever, was on the Minuteman bikeway. A man was riding along, and his girl's bike was tethered to his with what appeared to be red nylon dog leash. The girl was probably about five or six.

You ever wonder how some of these people manage to even dress themselves in the morning?
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Old 07-31-06, 05:46 PM
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I saw the greatest thing as I was leaving my daughter's house the other day. Dad and a little boy about five years old pulled into the driveway on their bikes. The little guy had on a helmet, knee, and elbow pads. On the driveway were the training wheels that Dad had just taken off the boy's bike.

They stopped and the little guy thrust his fist into the air and hugged his Dad who had knelt down on one knee to receive the hug. I pulled over and rolled down the window and the little boy beamed at me and told me had just ridden without training wheels for the first time. It was such a Norman Rockwell moment I almost cried.

I had just come from babysitting my four month old grandson. I can't wait until my son-in-law shares the joy of his son's first two-wheeled ride.
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Old 07-31-06, 06:24 PM
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I don't much remember about learning to bike, but I sure remember the freedom that that bike provided when I was old enough to be allowed to ride about the city! It was like the whole world opened up to me. My daughter had the same experience when she was allowed to ride "outside the neighborhood" without parental accompaniment. I can't imagnine parents driving alongside their kids shouting at them. What a shame.
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Old 07-31-06, 06:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Olebiker
I saw the greatest thing as I was leaving my daughter's house the other day. Dad and a little boy about five years old pulled into the driveway on their bikes. The little guy had on a helmet, knee, and elbow pads. On the driveway were the training wheels that Dad had just taken off the boy's bike.

They stopped and the little guy thrust his fist into the air and hugged his Dad who had knelt down on one knee to receive the hug. I pulled over and rolled down the window and the little boy beamed at me and told me had just ridden without training wheels for the first time. It was such a Norman Rockwell moment I almost cried.

I had just come from babysitting my four month old grandson. I can't wait until my son-in-law shares the joy of his son's first two-wheeled ride.
I hate to be a buzz killer, OB, and I don't mean to hijack this thread. But man, you just fell for the oldest scam in the book!

Here's how it works: A "little person" (or, if you aren't hip to politically correctness, a "midget") dresses up like a kid and hangs out in a front yard with his accomplice, a fatherly looking gentleman. They spot a likely looking sucker driving past (in this case, you) and act out their "little boy takes first ride without training wheels" scenario. Like a chump, you stop, roll down the window, have a Rockwell moment...and a couple more accomplices steal your hubcaps while you're wallowing in nostalgia-ville.

This game started out on the mean streets of Jersey in the 30's, and they've been pulling it off ever since. The genius part is that when you got home and noticed your hubcaps were gone, you didn't even connect the "boy" or "his father" to the rip off. In fact, you were so heartwarmed but the day's events, you didn't even report the stolen hubcaps to the fuzz! It's the perfect crime, baby...

Did the two guys look like this???
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Old 08-01-06, 02:26 PM
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Are parents today so lazy and so moronic, that they cannot even take ride with the kiddies?
Yep.

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Old 08-01-06, 03:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Olebiker
I saw the greatest thing as I was leaving my daughter's house the other day. Dad and a little boy about five years old pulled into the driveway on their bikes. The little guy had on a helmet, knee, and elbow pads. On the driveway were the training wheels that Dad had just taken off the boy's bike.

They stopped and the little guy thrust his fist into the air and hugged his Dad who had knelt down on one knee to receive the hug. I pulled over and rolled down the window and the little boy beamed at me and told me had just ridden without training wheels for the first time. It was such a Norman Rockwell moment I almost cried.

I had just come from babysitting my four month old grandson. I can't wait until my son-in-law shares the joy of his son's first two-wheeled ride.
Thank you for the counterpoint to the original post!!!

I will NEVER forget the days when my two boys first rode off without their training wheels. The smiles that they had were priceless.
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Old 08-01-06, 04:51 PM
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Was trying to clean up some boxes of stuff around the house... and what did I find... an old video tape of my son riding around for the first time. Never had training wheels... but had a hard time steering for the first couple of trips, and the stops were done Flintstone style... with the feet.

Hard to believe that lad is now gown and going to college.
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Old 08-01-06, 06:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Gary Diego
I hate to be a buzz killer, OB, and I don't mean to hijack this thread. But man, you just fell for the oldest scam in the book!
I thought it rather odd that the little guy had a five o'clock shadow and smelled vaguely of King Cobra malt liquor.
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Old 08-01-06, 08:22 PM
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NO NO NO! You've missed their point completely. Those adults aren't teaching their kids to ride. They just watched the Tour and they're practicing driving chase cars! Those kids on bikes are just there for them to practice with.
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Old 08-02-06, 09:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Digital Gee
I taught mine the old fashioned (and tiring) way - run alongside the bike, gradually let go, grab on if needed, let go again, encourage, encourage, encourage, and finally -- let 'em rip!
I did that too. Pity that she doesn't need help now, since I'm in better shape than I used to be and would probably have an easier time running alongside

Funny thing was, she never seemed to get the hang of it until she went riding at day camp with a group of kids, none of whom had training wheels on their bikes. The next day she was riding without training wheels just fine. Motivation is a wonderful thing.
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