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cold weather = gym workouts

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cold weather = gym workouts

Old 01-03-08, 06:14 AM
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alentric
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cold weather = gym workouts

It is too cold in NY for me to ride outside..Does anyone else ride on a gym bike?
I alternate using an interval program that rides --45 sec slow 15 sec fast-for 40 minutes
or just set a race program at 85 rpm for 12 -15 miles..
I am starting to get bored with this, but I have to exercise ..so I do it..
Anybody do anything different indoors on these cold days?
I used to run, but I have a slight tear in my knee-so I trying to avoid running long distances.
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Old 01-03-08, 06:49 AM
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Not any longer. Following Dnvrfox's lead, we put in a home gym this year with a weight machine, treadmill, and trainer with an older road bike on it. It's great not haivng to go out of the house. OTOH, I don't really mind riding in the cold as long as I can avoid ice and snow. In terms of boredom, the home gym has a TV and a pretty good audio system. So, I either watch TV or listen to music I'm trying to learn to play. The later usaully keeps my mind so busy I forget how long I've been working out. That said, there is nothing that replaces being outside riding in good weather. So, sometimes, I just bite the bullet and push through the boredom knowing it will make rides outside better later on. This morning it was 13 degrees with a strong wind and still dark. So, I pushed myself in the home gym.
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Old 01-03-08, 07:00 AM
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Originally Posted by BSLeVan View Post
Not any longer. Following Dnvrfox's lead, we put in a home gym this year with a weight machine, treadmill, and trainer with an older road bike on it.
This year I have changed my routine a bit:

I have been doing a lot of swimming, which I really like, and have not done in previous years. We are only 1 mile from our community rec center, and if I time it correctly, I can get there and not have to share a lap lane (which I hate). A couple of 25 yard lengths of the Australian Crawl will let you know whether or not you are in good shape aerobically real fast!

So, yesterday, I walked for two miles, lifted weights for an hour, and swam for 50 minutes.

Today, I am going to ride the trainer to the lovely voice of Coach Troy (the Spinerval video coach), lift some more weights, and the wife wants to go for a walk. I will also likely go to the gym and do a few exercises I want to do in a different way than I do them on my home gym (a lower back thing, the pec machine, the upper back machine, and biceps in a different way). By the way, when I recently got tested by a neurologist - they test your strength - he couldn't believe how strong I was. Also, when I had a cardiologist attempt to look at my heart, he could barely get the portable sonograph to work because of too much muscle mass in my chest. He told me laughingly that I was "too buff." At age 68, I don't mind this a bit, because the typical 68yo has lost about 30% of their muscular strength.

I also sang and played guitar for a nursing home for 45 minutes - and singing is a GREAT exercise for breathing appropriately.

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Old 01-03-08, 07:45 AM
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There are lots of articles like this

http://cbass.com/METABOLI.HTM

One Criterion
Energy requirement of muscle remains constant

Exercise Physiology, the excellent textbook by Drs. William D. McArdle, Frank I. Katch and Victor L. Katch (Lea & Febiger, 3rd Edition, 1991), tells us that people do tend to get fatter with age. College-age men average 15% bodyfat and older men are usually about 25%. Women in their youth carry bodyfat about 25% and move up to 35% or more by age 50. The doctors hasten to add, however, that these "average" values should not be accepted as normal. "We believe that one criterion for what is considered 'too fat' should be that established for younger men and women - above 20% for men and above 30% for women. There is probably no biologic reason for men and women to get fatter as they grow older." Increases in bodyfat, they explain, are more a function of activity than age. Inactivity results in loss of muscle. And loss of muscle, not an aging metabolism, is the primary cause of creeping obesity. The muscle that remains is as metabolically active as ever.

Here are the facts as presented by Lawrence E. Lamb, M.D., in his book The Weighting Game (Lyle Stuart, 1988) [see our recommended book list]. Researchers led by Dr. Ancel Keys at the University of Minnesota measured the energy requirements of people of different ages with different amounts of bodyfat. They found that the energy requirement of fat-free body weight (weight of the body minus the bodyfat) were remarkably constant for both men and women between the ages of 20 and 60. All the subjects, no matter what their sex or age, burned about 1.28 calories per hour per kilogram (2.2 lbs.) of fat-free body weight, under resting conditions.

To really understand what's going on here, we need to define "metabolism." Metabolism is the chemical and physical processes in the body that build and destroy tissue and release energy, thereby generating heat. Our metabolism speeds up when we exert ourselves, and we burn more calories. Our metabolism slows down when we are at rest, and we burn fewer calories. But even at rest, it should be emphasized, we continue to expend calories.

It's The Muscle
Reduced muscle mass causes slowing metabolism

It's true: metabolism usually falls with age. In other words, older people on average burn fewer calories per pound of bodyweight than do younger people. But that's because their lean body mass is less.

William Evans, Ph.D. and Irwin H. Rosenberg, M.D. confirm this in Biomarkers, their landmark book about controlling the aging process (Simon & Schuster, 1991) [see our recommended book list]. If you have a reduced amount of muscle, as most middle-aged people do, your metabolic demand for oxygen and your caloric needs decline. That's because muscle tissue is active tissue requiring nourishment. Fat is passive; it just sits there as a storage form of body energy. "We feel that older people's reduced muscle mass is almost wholely responsible for the gradual reduction in their basal metabolic rate."

Vicious Cycle
Slowing metabolism sets up fat gain

Evans & Rosenberg explain that this reduction in muscle mass - and the slowing of metabolism that it causes - sets up a vicious cycle. As our muscle mass falls, our calorie needs fall with it. According to the authors of Biomarkers, most people need to take in about 100 calories per day less each decade to maintain a level body weight. The problem, of course, is that we continue eating the same. "Too many calories coupled with too little exertion, a reduced musculature, and a declining metabolic rate add up to more and more fat." This cycle, they conclude, will only worsen over time - unless broken by a program that increases muscle and restores lost metabolism.

Diet , of course, helps to control creeping obesity. You should avoid calorie-dense foods and emphasize foods high in fiber and bulk. Eat plenty of fruit, vegetables and whole grains. But the main solution for an "aging metabolism" is exercise. Exercise burn calories while you exercise, and after exercise you continue to use more calories than at rest. Even mild exercise leaves you burning extra calories an hour later. If you exercise harder and longer, after 12 hours your energy requirements will still be elevated. And even at rest, your metabolically active muscles still use energy. The more muscle you have, the more calories you use, round the clock. That's why weight training is so important. It builds and maintains the calorie-burning muscle tissue that makes - and keeps - you lean. Lifting weights keeps your metabolic fires burning strongly.

Don't Be Discouraged
Old muscle just as responsive

And don't let anyone tell you that you can't increase your muscle size and strength as you get older. Evans and Rosenberg and their colleagues at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Human Nutrition Center on Aging at Tufts University have found that "the muscles of elderly people are just as responsive to weight training as those of younger people." Startlingly, an 8-week program of strength training by 87- to 96-year-old women confined to a nursing home resulted in a tripling of strength and a muscle-size increase of ten percent.

Their important conclusion: "Much of the loss of muscle as we age is preventable - and even reversible."

Dr. Lawrence Lamb agrees: "Developing an old muscle is just like developing a young muscle. You may need to be more careful and progress slower, but you can do it." Plus, keep training and pushing to your limit occasionally, and you'll keep your muscles - and your metabolism.

It comes down to this: Your metabolism won't slow down if you don't.
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