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entry level road bike

Old 04-08-08, 11:21 PM
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vincev
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entry level road bike

i returned to riding about 3 yrs ago.have shed about 30 lbs but still weigh around 250.have been using a trek 7.5. i took some of my old road bikes from the early seventies for a few rides and decided to get an entry level road bike this summer.i saw a 2007 trek 1000 i realy liked but am open to any info to help me make a wiser choice.thanks ahead of time for any info.
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Old 04-08-08, 11:31 PM
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im not a big fan of trek they price their bikes way to high, check out cannondale they have the same components and great frames, i ride the cannondale caad9 r5 triple its a solid road bike.

i was also looking at the specialized alez elite
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Old 04-08-08, 11:50 PM
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Actually Cannondale road bikes tend to cost more than the equivalent Treks, largely due to the higher manufacturing cost of their USA-made frames.

The 2007 Trek 1000 listed at around $700, should be cheaper now. A store in my area had them on sale last week in the mid-$500's. I believe Cannondale's entry level road bikes start at around $900.

I would scout all of your nearby bike shops to find if they have any '07 models on clearance in your size. It is hard to say what the best deal is in any particular area. Or what bike best fits you.
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Old 04-09-08, 04:56 AM
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The Trek 1000 has in years past won the best entry bike award from Bicycling Magazine.
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Old 04-09-08, 05:29 AM
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I think you will get a lot of different opinions, best thing I found when buying my Specialized Roubaix was just go out & test ride them.

I am new at road biking & I was really surprised at how much different brands & styles felt when you rode them.

For me I kept coming back to the Roubaix, but I also liked the Siqoua (sp?) which was cheaper, but decided on the Roubaix because of better components. The Siquoa was around $700.00 but that might have been for an 07 model.
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Old 04-09-08, 05:29 AM
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Whatever you get, make sure it fits.
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Old 04-09-08, 06:00 AM
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Not sure if you would classify it as entry level, but I'm very satisfied with my Lemond Reno. And with Lemond and Trek evidently splitting ways, you might find some Trek dealers offering good prices to clear out the Lemond brand.
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Old 04-09-08, 06:08 AM
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Don't worry about the brand. The important thing is fit. Make sure someone properly fits you. Go for several test rides. Bikes pretty much cost the same and what varies is the component grouping. For example, a Trek with Siora (sp?) may be cheaper than a Cannondale with Tiara (sp?) components, but that's because Siora is the bottim end of the component groupings. Essentially you get what you pay for.

If you want a bargain, look for last years models that still may be around.

(edit - I may have switched the component groupings around)
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Old 04-09-08, 06:25 AM
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I really like my 2005 Trek 1000. I bought mine used, and I see them a lot on Craigs List. So if you go that way, you can save about 50% by going used.

All that being said, test several bikes and get the one that fits/feels the best. So many good ones out there. And don't sweat it too much, as if you really get into riding, this will be just your first of many bikes. Any buying "mistake" is not permanent.
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Old 04-09-08, 06:55 AM
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I have a Y2K Trek 1000, and ride with someone who has the 2004 version. They're both nice bikes. I don't see why the 2007 would be any different. And you could negotiate a good price since it's last year's edition.

The only caveat is that it's a pretty aggressive position. This may not work for some, depending on flexibility.

All the entry-level bikes are similarly equipped, so you can safely ignore all that and focus on fit, position, ride, and bike shop differences. Not enough is generally said about comfort with your LBS, but it counts a lot.

I also have to echo what wrk101 says. Your first road bike is to teach you what you want and need in your second road bike. From that standpoint, you can't go too far wrong.
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Old 04-09-08, 07:18 AM
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You didn't say what your road bike from the 70s were. There were some very fine bike made during that time period, and a quality one might be worth upgrading with more modern parts. If, however, you believe this is not the way to go, the Trek is a fine entry level bike.

As others have said, there are some other things to consider. Here's what I would recommend to any friend looking to get an entry level road bike.

1. Set a realistic budget - based on what you can afford.
2. As StanSeven indicated, toss out any preconceived ideas about brand names. There are some really good bikes out there that aren't sporting the most popular brand name badges.
3. I'd look for a component group at least at the Shimano 105 level. Even seasoned riders can live with a component group this competent if they need to.
4. I would check with local bike shops to see what they have, as Tom Bombaldi had suggested. You might run into a real deal, and some shops carry quality used bikes worth considering.
5. As Blues Dawg suggested, make sure it fits. Don't let someone talk you into a bike that's the wrong size for you just because it's a good price. This is a very big mistake, because your riding enjoyment will suffer.
6. Think a little about frame materials. Each material has its advantages and short comings. If you don't intend to race or compete, you probably don't need the lightest, high tech bike out there. Many shops will promote a material based on what they have the most of to sell. But, this is a poor reason to choose a particular material. Keep in mind that the discussion about which material dampens road vibration the most is somewhat of a false discussion. Changing tire pressure plus or minus 5 lbs will have a greater impact than the frame material on most bikes. While aimed at the touring cyclist, here's a link that discusses frame materials and may be helpful. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/frame-materials.html
7. I think Craig's List can have some wonderful bargains, but if you don't know bikes that well, you can easily get taken.
8. If at all possible, take at least a 30 minute (longer if you can managed it) test ride on what you are seriously considering.
9. If buying from an individual ask if you can have a bike shop mechanic look over the bike prior to purchase.
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Old 04-09-08, 11:20 AM
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Plenty of entry level bikes around and all you will get from most of us is our favourite Manufacturer.

Just a suggestion- rather than find the bike- First Find the local bike shop. (LBS) There are plenty of them about but some are a lot better than others. They will set you up on the right size bike- Advise on the frame geometry and even set the bike up for you so that you are buying the right size bike that fits- and then make it fit better. Make of bike at this stage is immaterial as the only reason you are buying your first bike- is so that you can learn what your next bike will be.

That LBS may take some finding- but they will not try to sell you the one bike they have in stock- they will offer you the 07 bikes at a discount- if they are available and they will make a range of suggestions that will help you choose.
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Old 04-09-08, 05:36 PM
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I was in almost the exactly the same situation about a year ago. Had an older early 80's road bike that I used regularly but it was "conscripted" by a family member. That gave me an excuse for a new bike LeMond Reno.

I'm not pushing ANY brand but the suggestions that the members have posted here are spot on. Visit a bunch of shops; listen to their advice [or non-advice] and simply try as many as you can. Buy the one that fits you best you will know it after you compare.

For a recreational cyclist like me who uses the bike primarily for fun cardio workouts, I think that for $1,000 or less, you can get a superb bike that will probably last the rest of your life especially if you are in our age group!

Charlie
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Old 04-09-08, 06:28 PM
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You can really save a lot with a little leg work checking out stores that have last years model new bikes.
I saved $250 on an '07 Felt Z70 with an upgraded rear derailleur to the '08 model
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Old 04-09-08, 06:43 PM
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Originally Posted by section30 View Post
I think that for $1,000 or less, you can get a superb bike that will probably last the rest of your life especially if you are in our age group!

Charlie
Unfortunately, Charlie is probably correct on this!
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Old 04-10-08, 07:08 PM
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Nothing wrong with the Trek 1000 IMHO. My college senior son rides a 2005 model that we upgraded to 105 groupo this past Christmas.

You might want to go up a level or two to get the extra gears and trim shifters offered in the tiagra or 105 levels, if you have the extra cash.
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Old 04-10-08, 07:33 PM
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I have the Trek 1600 and really like it...although it just wet my appetite for a real nice CF bike.
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Old 04-10-08, 07:58 PM
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Originally Posted by stapfam View Post
Plenty of entry level bikes around and all you will get from most of us is our favourite Manufacturer.

Just a suggestion- rather than find the bike- First Find the local bike shop. (LBS) There are plenty of them about but some are a lot better than others. They will set you up on the right size bike- Advise on the frame geometry and even set the bike up for you so that you are buying the right size bike that fits- and then make it fit better. Make of bike at this stage is immaterial as the only reason you are buying your first bike- is so that you can learn what your next bike will be.

That LBS may take some finding- but they will not try to sell you the one bike they have in stock- they will offer you the 07 bikes at a discount- if they are available and they will make a range of suggestions that will help you choose.
+1. You'll never go wrong following that advice.
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Old 04-10-08, 09:52 PM
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07s

ya might find an 07 out there at a discount. work the phones. consider a cyclocross bike, you're a big guy. maybe Kona Jake.
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Old 04-11-08, 07:32 AM
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As clydesdale your biggest concern if you ride a lot will be wheels. Try to get high spoke count wheels, if possible in your price range, then keep an eye on them. If they get loose or warp, you can always have them relaced with some higher quality rims later. I use 36 spoke Mavic Open Pro wheels, they're very strong.
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Old 04-11-08, 08:08 AM
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From my own experience, go to the LBS with a clear idea of what your fit is-- seat height, bar height, saddle tilt and position, etc. The way they set up the bike for that test ride (hopefully more than circles in the parking lot) will influence greatly your impression of the bike. Saddles and bars can be changed out of course. As you test ride, "taking apart" your impressions can help...its hard to think about the rest of the bike if your butt hurts.
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Old 04-11-08, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by big john View Post
As clydesdale your biggest concern if you ride a lot will be wheels. Try to get high spoke count wheels, if possible in your price range, then keep an eye on them. If they get loose or warp, you can always have them relaced with some higher quality rims later. I use 36 spoke Mavic Open Pro wheels, they're very strong.
Big John has made a relevant point about wheels and heavier riders.

I am paranoid about the quality of OM wheels. It seems to be the one place that manufacturers cut corners on the cheaper bikes in their range. It does depend on your budget- but look at possibly upgrading the wheels to something better before you buy the bike- Or look as a good set of wheels as being your first upgrade.
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Old 04-11-08, 04:46 PM
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+1 on the Mavic open pros. I ride them with vintage Suntour hi flange hubs with a 36 spoke count. I'm not a Clyde but these babys sure roll nice with the Panaracer Pasela tour guard tires
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Old 04-11-08, 06:55 PM
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The most receint edition of Road Bike Action magazine rated the Trek 1.2 and the Scott S60 as excellent entry level bikes in the $700 range.
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Old 04-11-08, 08:13 PM
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As no one else has yet, I'll put in my plug for Jamis. They have the only entry level steel bike around and generally are better value (ie:higher grade components) than similar priced bikes. The Satellite and Ventura both are highly rated.
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