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65-85+ Thread

Old 07-11-13, 07:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Rich Gibson
Thanks for the advice. Gaining from others' experience has always been my choice. I'm about to pull the trigger on the Trek FX 7.6. It seems the optimum compromise for my needs.

Rich
Haven't the foggiest about all the different models of the different manufacturers. All I know is whether I like a specific bike or not. Wants and needs change over time. Right now I'm having to consider selling the road bikes I have and getting something with a longer wheelbase that will better accommodate my "new" body. Thankfully, I don't have so much in either bike that I couldn't give someone a good deal and we both walk away with a smile. That was a criteria when I bought the things.

Best of fortune to you. As you get along please don't forget to report back so I can learn from you.
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Old 07-12-13, 11:43 AM
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Rich - I think you're really going to like your new FX...whichever FX you choose!...i went with the 7.4 because my legs aren't the strongest and i'm used to 24 gears...so i really like the 27 gear setup on the 7.4!...plus, the 7.4 tires are a little bit wider for a bit smoother ride...

You're probably a little more athletic than me & should love the 7.6!
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Old 07-15-13, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by RCPlains
Rich - I think you're really going to like your new FX...whichever FX you choose!...i went with the 7.4 because my legs aren't the strongest and i'm used to 24 gears...so i really like the 27 gear setup on the 7.4!...plus, the 7.4 tires are a little bit wider for a bit smoother ride...

You're probably a little more athletic than me & should love the 7.6!
I'm not sure about how much more of an athletic man I am. I feel great after my daily ride on the elliptic, but when I try and get up after doing something on the floor it's agony! Anyway, I bought a Trek FX 7.6 with 32mm tires. I'm procrastinating about the saddle though. That's a tough decision since it's like shoes; everyone's butt is slightly different.
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Old 07-18-13, 09:52 PM
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I'm looking at recumbants and will probably buy either a 2 wheeler or trike. They have real nice ones in Grand Rapids and I'll be taking a trip down to take a look at their 24 and 27 speed trikes (They are manufactured in the USA, BTW). I'm switching from road bikes altogether since they gave me a fibrotic scar in the saddle area. The recumbants will eliminate this because of the flat seat.
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Old 07-19-13, 07:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Sandy Barringer
I'm looking at recumbants and will probably buy either a 2 wheeler or trike. They have real nice ones in Grand Rapids and I'll be taking a trip down to take a look at their 24 and 27 speed trikes (They are manufactured in the USA, BTW). I'm switching from road bikes altogether since they gave me a fibrotic scar in the saddle area. The recumbants will eliminate this because of the flat seat.
You do realize that you'll have to grow a beard to ride a recumbent, don't you? (Sorry, couldn't resist.)

I've also taken second looks at some of those bikes and wondered if they're somewhere in my future. One issue I can see is that they are a bit hard to find (few dealers stock them), so it's difficult to test-ride and compare them. Since there is such a wide variety of architectures, it makes it difficult to commit to one vs. another. The other issue would be transport. I've got a lot of nice local places to ride, but also enjoy traveling to try other trails around the state (such as the White Pine, which is about 3 hours away).
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Old 07-19-13, 09:10 AM
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Road Runner,
OK, I'll grow a beard. Hormones can do anything. Actually, I have several female friends who do ride recumbants, so both genders do it.
Fortunately, I have a truck, so transport is not an issue. I just will run it up the loading ramps and put it in the back and go.
I am having trouble choosing between the different architectures, but I will find one that will work for me. Changing to a recumbant is a necessity for me since cycling is my major choice for keeping health and fit. My doctor suggested I find another aerobic activity. I have looked, but other sports just don't appeal to me and resemble work (like gym in high school or P.T. in the military) and I'll end up not doing it. If I get up in the morning and say, "I must go work out." It becomes a forced activity and I won't do it. I want a sport that I can go out and play and just have a lot of fun. So, the recumbant is the sensible way to go.
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Old 07-19-13, 02:50 PM
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Sandy,

If possible you should check out the mid-west recumbent rally which I believe is coming up in August in WI. There will be a lot of them for you to try.

Something I did was to look at my physical problems verses seat positions. I have neck (nerve) problems and the closer my chin is to my chest the more discomfort I get in my neck either at the time or later on. We have upright bents, where I can hold my head up and like them a lot. They are Sun EZ-sports.


Also think about where your weight will be on your back. I didn't want a C-shaped seat with the weight on my tailbone. Your weight position will also change as your feet go up in the air higher (away from the ground).


Warning: When you first get on one it will feel "odd" and it takes a few rides to get used to them. It is not like changing DF's. It is a much bigger difference.


Go for it!
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Old 07-19-13, 03:10 PM
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More thoughts!

There is a lot of good general information at rbr.info ; bicycleman ; bent rider online. Three different sites.
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Old 07-19-13, 11:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Rich Gibson
I'm not sure about how much more of an athletic man I am. I feel great after my daily ride on the elliptic, but when I try and get up after doing something on the floor it's agony! Anyway, I bought a Trek FX 7.6 with 32mm tires. I'm procrastinating about the saddle though. That's a tough decision since it's like shoes; everyone's butt is slightly different.
Congrats on your new bike purchase!...ride & enjoy!...let us know how it goes... (I went with Memory Foam & springs for the seat...it took the pain out of riding)...
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Old 07-20-13, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by RCPlains
Congrats on your new bike purchase!...ride & enjoy!...let us know how it goes... (I went with Memory Foam & springs for the seat...it took the pain out of riding)...
What is the brand name and model...in case this one isn't the answer.

Thanks!
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Old 07-22-13, 05:26 AM
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Sandy and anyone else interested in trying a recumbent,

The reason I suggested the Mid West Recumbent Rally in another message to someone who doesn’t yet have a recumbent is most recumbent rallies have a component not found in most other bike events. They usually include a “demo” time with lots of recumbents to try. For example the schedule for the Mid West Recumbent Rally shows demo time both Saturday AM & PM. Based on reports from other forums there are people who go to these events just to attend the demo time.

Go and try one or more.
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Old 07-22-13, 09:13 AM
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Ive thought about a recumbent trike. Local shop got one in, but it was a cheapie and the gears didn't shift. I have friend that rides them--he rode from New Mexico to Georgia. He said don't get that brand. It's the only one I've had a chance to try and I didn't like it.
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Old 07-23-13, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Rich Gibson
What is the brand name and model...in case this one isn't the answer.

Thanks!
I went cheap!...Bell brand from Walmartl...it's held up well so far and very comfortable on the sometimes "not so smooth" pavement...
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Old 07-23-13, 03:43 PM
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Ride three today and the seat I bought (a discontinued Bontrager) works fine.

New question. Although the trails I've sought are for the most part concrete and asphalt there are stretches of compacted gravel. It's crushed granite and the edges of the stones are razor sharp. My 90psi 32mm tires are all over the place they're so firm. Any idea (anyone) how wide a tire I can go with to lessen the pressure and widen the track? Even the seams in the asphalt are painful to go over. Still I'm really enjoying myself. This trail is tree covered and the temperature was in the low 80s..what grand time!
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Old 07-23-13, 03:49 PM
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reduce your tire pressure. 90psi is too high.
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Old 07-23-13, 04:48 PM
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^^^ I agree.
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Old 07-24-13, 07:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Rich Gibson
Any idea (anyone) how wide a tire I can go with to lessen the pressure and widen the track?
I also agree with the tire pressure comments. However, in case you do consider wider tires, you will find that the limit on width is usually determined by the design of your bike, or more specifically the width at the front of the chainstays where you obviously need clearance. The "racier" bike models are usually too tight to go much above 700x25.

My Specialized Sequoia came with 700x25 tires and I managed to put a set of 700x32s on it, which greatly improved the ride smoothness at 80-85psi, only to find that the brake shoes wouldn't open wide enough to remove a wheel unless I deflated the tire! Fortunately I found some Tektro long-reach calipers that solved this problem.
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Old 07-24-13, 07:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Sandy Barringer
I'm looking at recumbants and will probably buy either a 2 wheeler or trike. They have real nice ones in Grand Rapids and I'll be taking a trip down to take a look at their 24 and 27 speed trikes (They are manufactured in the USA, BTW). I'm switching from road bikes altogether since they gave me a fibrotic scar in the saddle area. The recumbants will eliminate this because of the flat seat.
Today's Detroit News (7/24) had an article about older riders on trikes. The ones they showed in the photos were the ones with two wheels in front, one in back, and the pedals out beyond the front wheels.
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Old 07-24-13, 07:26 AM
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Originally Posted by ncbikers
Sandy and anyone else interested in trying a recumbent,

The reason I suggested the Mid West Recumbent Rally in another message to someone who doesn’t yet have a recumbent is most recumbent rallies have a component not found in most other bike events. They usually include a “demo” time with lots of recumbents to try. For example the schedule for the Mid West Recumbent Rally shows demo time both Saturday AM & PM. Based on reports from other forums there are people who go to these events just to attend the demo time.

Go and try one or more.
I absolutely agree.

There are several different recumbent bike & trike designs. They all ride a little differently and they all present a little different set of transport and storage issues. There is no substitute for being able to see and ride the various different designs and there is no better way of doing that than attending an event like the Midwest Recumbent Rally.
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Old 07-24-13, 07:33 AM
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Originally Posted by DougG
...

My Specialized Sequoia came with 700x25 tires and I managed to put a set of 700x32s on it, which greatly improved the ride smoothness at 80-85psi, only to find that the brake shoes wouldn't open wide enough to remove a wheel unless I deflated the tire! Fortunately I found some Tektro long-reach calipers that solved this problem.
I encountered the same problem with the 700x32mm tires I put on my Trek. The LBS rep showed me how to temporarily remove the brake cable from the caliper. Perhaps you can do the same with your bike?

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Old 07-24-13, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Rich Gibson
Ride three today and the seat I bought (a discontinued Bontrager) works fine.

Even the seams in the asphalt are painful to go over.
That's why I got a seat with memory foam & springs...cushions the ride!
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Old 07-25-13, 05:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Rich Gibson
I encountered the same problem with the 700x32mm tires I put on my Trek. The LBS rep showed me how to temporarily remove the brake cable from the caliper. Perhaps you can do the same with your bike?
Thanks, Rich, but those are a completely different type of caliper from what's found on a full "road bike." I was able to find replacement calipers designed for wider tires. IMO, the best solution for the whole situation is disc brakes: easy off and on without having to mess around with calipers and cables at all. And how many of us have made the mistake of riding off without putting the cable back, only to discover that we had no brakes the first time we tried to use them?
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Old 07-25-13, 01:34 PM
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Fourth ride today. Actually got the cadence sensor to work (Bontrager...they use zip ties to mount it!) Did 40 minutes. Boy these hills in northern Virginia are killing me. The change in grip and adjustable stem made the ride more comfortable. Fingers still get numb at the tips. I used some fingertip-less Home Depot gloves; maybe I'll try some dedicated riding gloves. My eldest son gave me a bike rack for the car. I may drive to a bike path; they seem to be along the streams, flatter.

Per the suggestions in another thread I lowered the tire pressure from 90psi to 50/70 front /back. Made quite a difference. I bought a pair of 35mm and tubes but I'll take them back.

Riding is so exhilarating. I just don't feel 71.
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Old 07-25-13, 02:24 PM
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Originally Posted by RCPlains
That's why I got a seat with memory foam & springs...cushions the ride!
That is fine for shorter rides. For longer rides - i.e., several hours, most of us find all that foam, etc., irritates our bottoms.

The theory behind saddles is to have your "sit bones" - ischeal tuberosities - support your weight, which is why seats are narrow, as your IT's are not too far apart.

It takes a bit for a "skinny" saddle to feel confortable, but onse it does - and one maay have to try several - it is the best.

YMMV

73 yo, been riding narrow for 15 years, now.
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Old 07-26-13, 09:08 AM
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Originally Posted by DnvrFox
That is fine for shorter rides. For longer rides - i.e., several hours, most of us find all that foam, etc., irritates our bottoms.

The theory behind saddles is to have your "sit bones" - ischeal tuberosities - support your weight, which is why seats are narrow, as your IT's are not too far apart.
Exactly so, DnvrFox. The saddle that feels really nice when you take it out and ride around the parking lot is the same one that gives you that monkey-butt feeling after a couple of hours. Even if you're not a Brooks convert like myself...
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