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What bike specific tools?

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What bike specific tools?

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Old 04-24-09, 06:35 PM
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HIPCHIP
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What bike specific tools?

Couldn't find anything through the search function, so that I'd ask.

I have basic tools, but I was wondering if there is a recommendation for bicycle specific tools? I look at the bike repair book I bought awhile back and it lists tons of tools, but says some are shop specific and too expensive for the average bicyclist, so I was wondering what you would consider a basic minimum or a lifesaver type of tools that you're so glad you have. Just trying to figure out what stuff to get since I'm getting serious.

Also wondering about recommendations for grease and oil for the bikes? The book was published about 10 years a go so I imagine there have been improvements, but even then they recommend "Bike specific oil and grease" and I don't recall seeing any at my LBS.

Anything else I should look at getting?

Thanks,
Dan'o :**

PS, someone wanna give me the definition of a "Fred"? Looked, but nothing specific. I doubt it's a complement, but one post called a good item a Fred and it didn't make sense.
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Old 04-24-09, 07:42 PM
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Don't know the age of your bike but on my new 09 Jamis Trail-X everything seems to be "allen key" so I bought a $20 Multi-Tool that has a lot a allens, flat/phillips screwdriver, chain tool, set of plastic tire irons, chalk for marking of the hole and I carry a small "needle nose plier" for pulling of cables, a spare "slime" tube, tube repair kit, 3 cable ties, that's my whole tools and I think I could do any minor repair, I may add a couple of cone wrenches and a pedal wrench one day. My wife has the cheaper Trail-X 1.0 and I have to add a "8mm wrench" as she has 1 "standard bolt head on her front derailer clamp".

They make lubes for all kinds of conditions these days, dry/dusty or wet/muddy, ect. I like teflon lubes for the chain as they seem to "stick" better and use "Tri-Flow" to lube cables, moving parts on the two derailers, ect. I only use WD-40 as a "cleaner" for the chain between serious cleaning with a "orange based degreaser" and LOW-Pressure water.

I'm with you on FRED, it seems to be either:

1. a rider who rides with reg. shorts/t-shirt/tennis shoes/no helmet, ie: nothing bicycle specific (also maybe rides a X-Mart bike?)

2. a rider who's not wearing a "racing KIT" from their professional racing team, just plain colored bicycle specific clothes, (ie: ME)

FYI, YMMV!
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Old 04-24-09, 08:46 PM
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A rider who has all of the acoutrements and can't ride is certainly one definition of a fred
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Old 04-24-09, 09:39 PM
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My favorite bike-specific tool is my bicycle workstand. It makes bikes so much easier to work on and clean.

Chainwhip for removing cassettes.

Chaintool.

Pedal wrench.

If you get into installing/overhauling your own bike, a really good cable cutter is nice to have to get clean cuts on cables.

Spoke wrench.

And on and on...it's easy to over do it on tools (I like tools). I bought mine one at a time as a learned new things to do on the bike...
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Old 04-25-09, 12:20 AM
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Buy the tools as you require them. Need to change the rear cassette- Buy the chain whip and Tool to remove it. To remove Chainset and find out what type you have before buying the tool to fit.

These are the two tools I use more often than any other- The rest of the bike will come apart with normal tools- Or a BIG hammer
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Old 04-25-09, 01:32 AM
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Like Stafam says, buy workshop tools as you need them. I've got a bottom bearing tool (among other things) because I pull bikes apart and put them back together ... sort of. If you get your lbs (local bike shop) to do all your work, you don't need anything bar a basic emergency kit.

Basic emergency kit?
Enough tools to change a tube. If you've got quick release hubs like most bikes have, that amounts to a set of tyre levers, a spare tube and a patch kit (for when you stuff up the new tube you just put in). If you don't have quick release hubs (like me with my fixed gear bike), you'll need an appropriate spanner.
A pump - two pumps actually, one for the bike and good floor pump for the shed (much easier to use though the Topeak RoadMorph and her brothers have a good go and being both).
Things do work loose so I recommend carrying enough allen keys to do up every bolt on the bike - on modern bikes, you'll cover that with three allen keys. However, there are some cheap multi-tools that have a range of allen keys and some other nice bits.
And that's it.

Now, for the rest of the stuff. If you decide you want to do something to your bike (replace a cassette, change a chain, turn it into a quivering heap of alloy components), buy the appropriate tools from your lbs as you need them ... or pay them to do the work, it works about the same the first time.

Grease - any grease will do the job. However, you don't need much, even if doing a lot of work on your bike, so just buy what your lbs recommends and the tubes are the most convenient (you use so little price is a non-issue).
Oil? Same advice from me. However, this topic often starts wars of almost religious intensity. Mate, if you keep your chain clean and lubed it will last a long time. If you ignore it, it'll die. What you use on it has a myriad of pros and cons, you'll work out what works for you over time.

Richard
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Old 04-25-09, 06:31 AM
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You didn't say if you want tools to use at home or on the bike. Others have discussed the at home tools. Here's the only tool I carry on the bike.
Topeak Alien II. It takes care of almost any repair when on the road.

All the other things aren't considered "tools", just necessary IMHO.
Pump, CO2 inflator, and spare tube.
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Old 04-25-09, 06:51 AM
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FRED:

There are two rather different definitions of a Fred.

1. Someone who has all the gear, paraphernalia and the like and doesn't have a clue what to do with them. ALso known as a poseur.

2. Someone who doesn't give a hoot about dress, bike style and the rest, and who doesn't even know that he doesn't give a hoot, and can likely beat you in a race or hill climbing or whatever. As I saw yesterday on my ride, a guy pedaling down the trail wearing brown loafers, saggy sweater, street clothes, having a great time on his old hybrid with his binoculars watching the birds. But, he rode as far and as fast as I did. If someone says, "I am a Fred" then, automatically, they aren't, because a TRUE Fred has no insight or knowledge that he actually IS a Fred. However, one can be "Fred-Like."

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Old 04-25-09, 07:57 AM
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Buy a basic tookit, then add on as needed. Here is a mid-range one on sale for $100

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product..._200278_200501
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Old 04-25-09, 10:38 AM
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Thanks all. Sounds like I'm pretty much set on tools then as I rode motorcycles for 40 years and have a pretty good tool collection. Sounds like I'll only need the specialty tools for when I need to work on that specific specialty part, so I'll hold off. Most of the stuff was for at-home tools, but you folks bring up a lot of good info for on the road tools too that I wasn't sure of, so I will look into some of the multi-tools and not carry around half my toolbox with me.

I think I got the idea of what a Fred is. I can see where something could, or could not, be a Fred at the same time, it just depends. Oh well, when I ride I'll try not to be a Fred, maybe I'll be a Barney or more than likely a Bam Bam (The Flintstones reference-LOL)
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Old 04-25-09, 11:16 AM
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I second stepfam's suggestion of buying the tools as you need them. Check out the Park Tool website (http://www.parktool.com/repair/ ) for both how to do the job, what tool to use and how to use the tool. Of course you don't need to actually buy Park brand, but I find their shop-quality tools are very good for the $'s. I don't care for their cheaper line.

A tool I'd buy immediately is a chain stretch gauge. Save those cassettes and rings. I prefer an actual measuring tool rather than a go/no-go device.

Al

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Old 04-25-09, 11:43 AM
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Pedal wrenches are good for the old school pedals, but the newer pedals allow you to use standard thickness open end wrenches. Just buy what you need and it'll most likely be some specialty tool. Many of the bike tool sets include many tools you may already have and your current tools may be of better construction and quality.
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Old 04-25-09, 12:27 PM
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A good set of bicycle specific cable cutters will allow you to do your own cabling work on your bike. While doing new cables, you will learn a lot about setting derailleurs, shifters and brakes. Learn to do this well and you are on your way to being able to keep your bike in top line condition.
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Old 04-26-09, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by maddmaxx View Post
A good set of bicycle specific cable cutters will allow you to do your own cabling work on your bike. While doing new cables, you will learn a lot about setting derailleurs, shifters and brakes. Learn to do this well and you are on your way to being able to keep your bike in top line condition.
On that point, about a year ago I upgraded to the newer Park heavy duty cutters. While they work better than anything I've experienced, I still find that I get a much cleaner cut with my Dremel tool for the outer casing. Once you cut casing with a Dremel, you never go back.

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Old 04-26-09, 08:10 AM
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Originally Posted by HIPCHIP View Post
Thanks all. Sounds like I'm pretty much set on tools then as I rode motorcycles for 40 years and have a pretty good tool collection. Sounds like I'll only need the specialty tools for when I need to work on that specific specialty part, so I'll hold off. Most of the stuff was for at-home tools, but you folks bring up a lot of good info for on the road tools too that I wasn't sure of, so I will look into some of the multi-tools and not carry around half my toolbox with me.
Yes, Stapfam was spot on...I buy tools as needed. A multi-tool to carry on the road is a must.

If you don't already have a set of metric Allen wrenches, I'd advise getting one. You can make adjustments with a multi-tool but proper Allen wrenches make it easier and aren't all that expensive.
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Old 04-26-09, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by dcvelo View Post
If you don't already have a set of metric Allen wrenches, I'd advise getting one. You can make adjustments with a multi-tool but proper Allen wrenches make it easier and aren't all that expensive.
Very important to have the correct metric Allen wrench, some English types fit, but not securely, and if you strip the head out of an Allen screw, you are...

Also, I would suggest a good set of Metric ignition wrenches. These are smaller than the full size, narrow and fit well in tight areas, often preventing over torquing a nut or bolt head, also helps to avoid paint scratching.

Sears has both sets, metric, Allen and ignition in handy pouches for a reasonable price. I have used these frequently on my bikes and previously on the electronics gear I repaired when a practicing field service engineer in the computer industry.

Also, buying specials only when needed, is good advise, or if it is a one time need, some LBS will charge a nominal fee for the use of the tool, or will do the removal and reassembly for you. (Not many, but a few if asked nicely and repor is present.)
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Old 04-26-09, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by bab2000 View Post
Very important to have the correct metric Allen wrench, some English types fit, but not securely, and if you strip the head out of an Allen screw, you are...

Also, I would suggest a good set of Metric ignition wrenches. These are smaller than the full size, narrow and fit well in tight areas, often preventing over torquing a nut or bolt head, also helps to avoid paint scratching.

Sears has both sets, metric, Allen and ignition in handy pouches for a reasonable price. I have used these frequently on my bikes and previously on the electronics gear I repaired when a practicing field service engineer in the computer industry.

Also, buying specials only when needed, is good advise, or if it is a one time need, some LBS will charge a nominal fee for the use of the tool, or will do the removal and reassembly for you. (Not many, but a few if asked nicely and repor is present.)
Good info, I'll check with my LBS and see what they do.
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