Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

What should I expect?

Reply

Old 06-25-09, 08:56 PM
  #1  
professorbob
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 677
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What should I expect?

I've mentioned a few weeks back that I'm pre-diabetic and have been working hard on the bike to lose weight and build up cardio. Oh yeah, there's the belly thing as well... I stared in April weighing in the high 270's and I'm now just breaking into the 250's. I've been doing 100 miles/week and have a goal to increase it to 125 on July 1 and 150 on Aug. 1. So most of my rides are between 20 and 35 miles.

Today I did my 2nd solo 1/2 century. Such a cool name for a 50 mile ride. In any case the 1st 50-miler was as flat as a pancake as I wanted to make sure I could finish it. Today, I did a similar route, but added a couple of short but steep hills to compare myself to 3 weeks ago. I finished with an average speed of 14.8mph. After I was done, I kept on telling myself that I wish I could do better. I stopped every 10 miles or so for a quick water break and then at about the halfway point, I was getting hungry and had a turkey sandwich on whole wheat with more water. At about the 40 mile mark, I was beginning to bonk. I stopped at a gas station and drank a can of coke-I think I needed the sugar. Got back on my bike and realized my back tire was flat. I spent about 20 minutes patching it and hit the road. I think the rest and sugar really helped, because I was able to ride the final leg pretty hard.

I know that if I weighed 100lbs. less, I could have finished the ride at a much faster pace. At my weight, how much more should I expect? Or should I have more patience and know that as my weight goes down, my speed and climbing will improve?
professorbob is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-09, 09:14 PM
  #2  
bcoppola
King of the molehills
 
bcoppola's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Detroit 'burbs, east side.
Posts: 1,194

Bikes: '04 Giant OCR2, '87 Schwinn World Sport F/G conversion, '85 Schwinn Super Le Tour, '92 Trek 820

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by professorbob View Post
(...)Or should I have more patience and know that as my weight goes down, my speed and climbing will improve?
Just answered your own question! Keep riding - you're obviously motivated & that's a big plus. And have fun - don't forget that.

However, 10 miles between water breaks is way too long. I'll bet you bonked because you were dehydrated. You should carry one or two water bottles, sip often, and be REFILLING them every 10 miles - less if it's hot and/or dry. On hot summer club rides of only 25-30 miles I carry two bottles and they're empty or nearly so when I finish.

Climbings a b***h anyway - I'm "only" about 20 lbs overweight and it ain't easy. Even at the top of the pro ranks some riders are good climbers, and some ain't. It's just the body you were given.

Another slight factor: sometimes stopping for too long, like maybe for that meal, during a ride will allow the muscles to tighten up.
bcoppola is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-09, 09:40 PM
  #3  
professorbob
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 677
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for getting back so quickly. I actually had about a total of 5 bottles, plus the Coke. Maybe still not enough? In retrospect, I didn't load up on the fluids the day before, which I'm sure would have helped. And I did stretch out quite a bit after eating. Actually, I think I really did need the food-I was feeling not just hungry, but almost panicked that I hadn't eaten properly beforehand and if I didn't eat something substantial, there would have been problems. Funny, but I haven't had that issue on the 35 mile hilly rides. In the future, I'll make sure to drink more and eat better before the ride.
professorbob is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-09, 10:00 PM
  #4  
Artkansas 
Pedaled too far.
 
Artkansas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: La Petite Roche
Posts: 12,853
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Loading up on fluids the day before wouldn't help. Though what I've found good in the heat is to start drinking about 20 minutes before I start riding. Definitely keep the water coming, smaller amounts more frequently. Food too. Search the forums. There's a lot already said about eating and riding.

You may want to avoid straight sugar unless you are bonking right then. It can send you up and then down.
__________________
"He who serves all, best serves himself" Jack London

Originally Posted by Bjforrestal View Post
I don't care if you are on a unicycle, as long as you're not using a motor to get places you get props from me. We're here to support each other. Share ideas, and motivate one another to actually keep doing it.
Artkansas is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-09, 10:06 PM
  #5  
Robert Foster
Banned.
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Southern california
Posts: 3,498

Bikes: Lapierre CF Sensium 400. Jamis Ventura Sport. Trek 800. Giant Cypress.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by professorbob View Post
Thanks for getting back so quickly. I actually had about a total of 5 bottles, plus the Coke. Maybe still not enough? In retrospect, I didn't load up on the fluids the day before, which I'm sure would have helped. And I did stretch out quite a bit after eating. Actually, I think I really did need the food-I was feeling not just hungry, but almost panicked that I hadn't eaten properly beforehand and if I didn't eat something substantial, there would have been problems. Funny, but I haven't had that issue on the 35 mile hilly rides. In the future, I'll make sure to drink more and eat better before the ride.
Just a suggestion, was this a water bottle full of water or something else? I use electrolyte replacement drinks. Water just doesn’t do it for me if I am working up a good sweat, one water and one Poweraid works. Hammer and FRS make replacement drinks as well. I go through two bottles in 40 miles and I drink while I ride, every 30 minutes at least and more often if I think I need it.
Robert Foster is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-09, 10:10 PM
  #6  
HIPCHIP
Lance Legweak
 
HIPCHIP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Woodland, California, USA
Posts: 828

Bikes: Felt Z-70, GT RTS-2

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Dehydration WILL slow you down, sap your energy, and can make you dizzy and even pass out. At worst you can die, so dehydration is a major thing. Drinking enough fluid the night before can help, but drinking during the ride will definitely help, and sipping fluid that evening after the ride will help you to rehydrate. Thirst is not a good indicator of hydration, so if you are thirsty you've gone too long. Using electrolyte drinks, I.E. Gatorade, can help on a ride, but only if you are riding for over an hour, and even then you want to water it down 50%. Drink the Gatorade type of drinks after the ride to replenish everything. This is extremely important on really hot days where you perspire a bunch!

If you pee and it comes out dark yellow and/or you can see it flowing down the toilet, then you are dehydrated. If it's a light yellow or clear then your hydration should be sufficient. If the heat just started, then it can take up to two weeks to become acclimated to it, so take it easy on the first warm/hot days.

Just watch your diet, count your calories, and you will lose weight and get in better shape. Stopping to take a break can allow the blood to stop pooling and circulate, which will give you the "Second Wind", I do that all the time if I start to bonk, so do it. If it works for you, then it works, so keep up the good work.

I used to be 241, now I'm down to below 190 and I hope to lose another 20-25 lbs, so I know what you're going through. Keep up the good work.
HIPCHIP is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-09, 05:10 AM
  #7  
cyclinfool
gone ride'n
 
cyclinfool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 4,051

Bikes: Simoncini, Gary Fisher, Specialized Tarmac

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by professorbob View Post
added a couple of short but steep hills to compare myself to 3 weeks ago. I finished with an average speed of 14.8mph.
50 miles solo with a few steep hills and 14.8 mph, sounds good to me!
Could you do better - most likely but this isn't bad so don't beat yourself up.
cyclinfool is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-09, 07:46 AM
  #8  
Allegheny Jet 
Senior Member
 
Allegheny Jet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Medina, OH
Posts: 5,806

Bikes: confidential infromation that I don't even share with my wife

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
I think your riding progress is going very well. Your weekly average of 100 miles is commendable for a new rider. For a lot of riders adding 10 to 15% a week is doable. Don' forget to take a recovery week every 3 or 4 weeks where your intensity and frequency are backed off to enable the body to recover and build new muscle. As you continue to get fit you will figure out what your body requires during the ride. At the same time your body will begin to utilize different resources (internal and imbibed) to fuel your riding.

If weight loss is the primary goal for your bike riding don't be too concerned with picking up your speed on rides. When demands to your CV system exceed a certain point the body will need more fuel from outside sources. If you keep your riding intensity in the aerobic zone (Zone 2) most all the fuel needed comes from fat stores that you are already carrying. You will only need to rehydrate during rides of less than 2.5 to 3 hrs.
__________________
oldschool areodynamic brick
Allegheny Jet is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-09, 08:38 PM
  #9  
billydonn
Council of the Elders
 
billydonn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 3,759

Bikes: 1990 Schwinn Crosscut, 5 Lemonds

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I think you are making commendable progress. Cruising in the 14-15 range isn't bad at all. Steady as she goes and you will be just fine. Enjoy your rides.
billydonn is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-09, 04:36 PM
  #10  
kenkayak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Phippsburg,Me.
Posts: 621

Bikes: Trek 7300/cannondale mountain bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Well professor; I dont understand why your not droping weight faster and as you do lose the weight your not going to believe the difference on the hills and your endurance.///The peramiter of weight to hill climbing is something that will give you good courage as your climbing improves.Kenneth
kenkayak is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-09, 09:12 PM
  #11  
professorbob
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 677
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
To clear things up, I've actually been riding on and off for 30 years. It's just that this year I"ve made a commitment to be very serious about it. The 50 did the other day couldn't have been in better weather. 72 degrees and sunny. Light wind. Today I did a different sort of ride. Similar weather. 30 miles at about the same pace. Did it on my older touring-type bike (weighs a ton). I felt great from beginning to end. Maybe it's just a case of some days you eat the bear and some days the bear eats you?!?
professorbob is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service