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help with upgrade, please

Old 06-02-10, 11:24 AM
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travelrn
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help with upgrade, please

Hi,
I returned to cycling at the age of 51 after perhaps a 20+ break. I'm loving it but now feel I need to upgrade my bike. I bought a 7100 trek in 2008. I now feel the need for speed. I don't anticipate doing really long rides (>25 miles) and don't really want to spend BIG bucks on a carbon bike that it truthfully more than I need but I don't want to make the mistake of going cheap and regretting it next season. Any suggestions would be well welcomed. I'm looking at the trek fx series. I love my lbs and they sell lamond and treck.
thanks in advance.
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Old 06-02-10, 11:36 AM
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This may be just my pro-steel bias talking, but I don't think a new bike will make you a lot faster. Of course there will be some difference, and new bikes always FEEL faster, but in terms of mph, I dunno. Would you be better off riding until the bike you have is slowing you down? By then you'll have an idea what you need in terms of gearing and set-up (most riders our age are overgeared, seems to me--how often do you really use the 53 ring with the small end of the cassette?) and be able to make a better choice.
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Old 06-02-10, 11:59 AM
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The easiest and least expensive way to make a bike faster is to put skinnier tires on it. Less surface area on the road, less rolling resistance. That's why you see road race bikes with very thin tires. The trade-off being that they have less traction and are squirlier on loose surfaces. Yours came with 700x32c I believe. If you ride mainly on paved roads, you may want to try going to a 700x28 or even a 700x25.
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Old 06-02-10, 12:06 PM
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+1 you're not going to see a speed increase by 'upgrading' from a 7100 to an FX-series. Not enough to justify the price, anyway. If you want to make a significant difference in your speed, you're going to have to change styles, to either a full road bike or a racing recumbent. And your LBS probably doesn't sell the 'bents...
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Old 06-02-10, 12:30 PM
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You can be fast on a hybrid, I remember one century getting whooped by a guy on a hybrid, although he was young and very fit.
Drop bars will put you in a more aerodynamic position, the bigger gears of a road configuration (even a compact) will drive you faster when you can push them.
Narrow, higher pressure tires will give you less rolling resistance. Don't know if you are using clipless pedals but they will help a lot as well.
If your problem is "the engine" and not the bike - and it usually is, then all this won't give you the speed you are looking for but it may give you the motivation to improve the engine itself.

The mid range FX series with a carbon fork looks pretty good. Not my cup of tea, but should be a good starting point. Try it out and see if you like it.

I am an Aluminum bigot so don't ask me to recommend one
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Old 06-02-10, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by cyclinfool View Post

I am an Aluminum bigot so don't ask me to recommend one
Aaaah-but there is aluminium and aluminium. My Boreas is Al - and lightweight- rides like a dream and gives a compliant ride. Only thing is the frame cost more than most people spend on a complete bike.

But the best upgrade that can be done to most bikes is new wheels and tyres. Try the tyres first and 700x23 in a good form like Michelin PR3's or Continental 4000S are a great favourite for speed machines. On the wheels- Most stock wheels are machine built so get them into a Wheel builder to get him to work his magic on them- and listen to his advice if he wants you to buy the $1,000 wheelset. Only listen and choose something more sensible- like Mavic OpenPro on Ultegra or 105 hubs.
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Old 06-02-10, 02:52 PM
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buy acarbon bike 4.5 get it over with? i started on a7100 and went to a 1.2 and ayear later went to a4.5 madone. they are wright it takes power to make it go . my average went up 3 miles perhour and the carbon frame makes the ride a little smother. 7100 to fx not worth it. go test drive?
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Old 06-02-10, 03:55 PM
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Originally Posted by travelrn View Post
Hi,
I returned to cycling at the age of 51 after perhaps a 20+ break. I'm loving it but now feel I need to upgrade my bike. I bought a 7100 trek in 2008. I now feel the need for speed. I don't anticipate doing really long rides (>25 miles) and don't really want to spend BIG bucks on a carbon bike that it truthfully more than I need but I don't want to make the mistake of going cheap and regretting it next season. Any suggestions would be well welcomed. I'm looking at the trek fx series. I love my lbs and they sell lamond and treck.
thanks in advance.
First thing to check, the motor, mostly speed issues are related to a motor that is not up to scratch. If you smoke, quit, if your over weight, then ride more and eat better.

Second, check that your bicycle is in good mechanical shape, you can lose a lot of power from a wheel out of true, a dirty chain or improper tire pressure. If your mechanically able, check these things out yourself, if not then you should take your bicycle for a full check at the dealer at least once a year, if there is a winter off season, twice if there isn't.

Third, you should also get your bicycle fit checked, a bicycle that doesn't fit quite right, can lose a lot of power compensating for the poor fit, for example unless you were a serious cyclist back in the day, your saddle is probably too low.

Fourth, most speed comes from using the proper gear ratios, are you running out of top gear, then you really need a crank that has a larger big ring or a cassette that has smaller cogs or both.

Fifth, you want nice smooth tires, because they give you better grip on hard surfaces, you also want the proper width tires, basically you want the narrowest tire that can hold your weight while squishing down no more then 15% from an unloaded state. This will give you the least rolling resistance while not needing to go to the dentist for fillings replacement after every ride.

Sixth, you want to ride more, 25 miles really isn't that far, we have guys here who go on 100 mile rides, and most of them are older then you are.

The only real reason to change bikes is because you can't go far enough, due to comfort, to give the motor a sufficient workout. If comfort is the issue, then even a moderately priced drop bar road bike, will probably help with that problem.
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Old 06-02-10, 06:17 PM
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Here you go:
http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...pilot/pilot20/
http://www.trekbikes.com/images/bike...ilverblack.jpg
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Old 06-02-10, 06:59 PM
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Yep. If I were buying a bike now I would look at the Trek Pilot series.

Or if my wife were buying, I'd take a very close look at the Rivendells.

PS. I think the Pilot is reasonably spec'd out for the money.

PPS. If I lived in the flatlands I'd buy me a steel SS from BikesDirect.
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Old 06-02-10, 08:58 PM
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N+1. When I got back into riding a couple of years ago, I was riding a hybrid. It is now long gone. My current main ride is a 1987 Schwinn Prologue, with an all modern Ultegra nine speed drivetrain. I have several bikes. Can't have too many. Just consider used. The values are compelling.

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Old 06-02-10, 09:56 PM
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I have 6 bikes( I know, it is disgusting), and the least expensive one is my favorite ride. I ride it almost every day. My "good" bike gets ridden about tree dozen times a year. Granted, the higher end bike is lighter, but I really can't tell much difference in the rides. I put a decent carbon fork on a Trek 1000 ( $350 on sale + $100 for the fork) and figured I'd ride it as my winter bike until the lower end components failed. That was seven or eight years ago and I'm still waiting to upgrade those componenets. It shifts better than bikes with components 4 places higher up the "food chain". The point is that a bike that fits well, is well maintained, and matches your riding style is a dream to ride regardless of price. FWIW- try different styles of bikes, determine you goals and try to match the bike to your body and your aspirations.

Crater LakeNational Park, OR- 4th of July- with the Trek
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Old 06-03-10, 05:38 PM
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Owning and riding a real nice bike is really a joy. Its something that you will look forward to each and every time you step out for a ride. You can even get PSIMET to build up a 50mm carbon clincher with your choice of components. Heck, you might want to go beyond the 25 miles just because its so much fun.
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Old 06-07-10, 11:03 AM
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travelrn
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thanks to all!

I wanted to thank eveyone for the awesome advice. I'm still leaning toward the trek. I agree totally that the fx may not do much for me.I did do a few test drives and am loving the carbon.
Hope to be riding my new purchase soon.
sidnie
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