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Am I Nuts?

Old 08-08-11, 07:17 AM
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Am I Nuts?

OK, I'm a 52 year old male that has just gotten back into cycling this summer. My wife bought me a MTB quite a few years back and of course I never rode the thing, until this summer. Always to busy, you've all heard that before! Anyway, I am loving being back in the saddle again, the wind in the hair, the pain in the legs, the sweat in the eyes and that wonderful feeling of being out of breath - it's great!

So I've gotten in pretty good shape again and have lost a decent amount of weight. I have to travel farther and farther to get a good workout in, so the MTB is not so great anymore. Pushing it through the streets is not so much fun anymore, so I purchased a Miyata road bike, a 90 Miyata 1400 AlumiTech - which of course has down tube shifters. It should be here this week.

So am I crazy? Will I be able to handle down tube shifting again after so many years away from one? I have to tell you, I'm abit nervous about it. Getting back into city traffic was tough enough on the MTB with handlebar shifters, but down tube is another story I think.

What do you guys think?
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Old 08-08-11, 07:31 AM
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I think that after a couple of days, using down tube shifters again will be second nature.

As to whether you are nuts or not, I can't say. What are your symptoms?
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Old 08-08-11, 07:38 AM
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Just don't stick your finger into the front tire. Down tube shifters were all we had for years.
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Old 08-08-11, 07:39 AM
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You should be fine. It is not too difficult or costly to install bar-end shifters on an older bike, if you don't like taking your hands away from the handlebars;


Last edited by Barrettscv; 08-08-11 at 07:43 AM.
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Old 08-08-11, 07:39 AM
  #5  
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Originally Posted by Giacomo 1 View Post
I am loving being back in the saddle again

a 90 Miyata 1400 AlumiTech - which of course has down tube shifters. It should be here this week.

Will I be able to handle down tube shifting

What do you guys think?
I think

Good for you

Nice bike. Something special about Japanese early 90s

Sure, no problem at all. Shifters within finger reach are convenient and efficient because they make very frequent shifts easy - but, if you stay in a softer gear for longer and maybe tough out for a minute longer on an incline until you feel it's safe to take a hand off for a second, you'll probably develop skills of both cadence and strength

As with finger-reachable shifters, you don't HAVE to shift just because you can!
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Old 08-08-11, 07:57 AM
  #6  
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Thanks for all the good replies, I'm starting to feel better about this whole deal.


Originally Posted by wobblyoldgeezer View Post
I think

Good for you

Nice bike. Something special about Japanese early 90s

Sure, no problem at all. Shifters within finger reach are convenient and efficient because they make very frequent shifts easy - but, if you stay in a softer gear for longer and maybe tough out for a minute longer on an incline until you feel it's safe to take a hand off for a second, you'll probably develop skills of both cadence and strength

As with finger-reachable shifters, you don't HAVE to shift just because you can!
Funny you should mention frequent shifting, because when I first started riding again, I was a shifting tornado, shifting so often to keep myself going. It's way to easy with these new handlebar shifters so I developed a bad habit. But as I got into better shape and knowing I wanted an older road bike with DTS, I slowed way down on my shifting to prepare. and I am a much better rider because of it. As you said, my cadence, strength and rythm is pretty good now. I'm also guessing that with the lighter aluminum frame of the Miyata, I shouldn't need to shift alot anyway, at least on the flat stuff.

glad you like my choice in bikes too!
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Old 08-08-11, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Giacomo 1 View Post
Thanks for all the good replies, I'm starting to feel better about this whole deal.

glad you like my choice in bikes too!
You're welcome.

By the way, I asked around. It seems you're nuts
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Old 08-08-11, 08:35 AM
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Originally Posted by wobblyoldgeezer View Post
You're welcome.

By the way, I asked around. It seems you're nuts
Ah ha, I see you talked to my wife....
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Old 08-08-11, 08:41 AM
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I just got back in the saddle with an 87 Cannondale roadie and I had a little trouble shifting at first, not drifting, looking down, but it's all coming back to me know. And I really love being back on the road-
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Old 08-08-11, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Oneiron View Post
I just got back in the saddle with an 87 Cannondale roadie and I had a little trouble shifting at first, not drifting, looking down, but it's all coming back to me know. And I really love being back on the road-
Thats what I need to hear!

I guess you never really forget, you just got to knock the rust off abit!
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Old 08-08-11, 09:00 AM
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Not sure what you had in the past, but if your previous DT shifting experience was with friction shifters, indexed DT shifters will be no prob.
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Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."
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Old 08-08-11, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Giacomo 1 View Post
OK, I'm a 52 year old male that has just gotten back into cycling this summer. My wife bought me a MTB quite a few years back and of course I never rode the thing, until this summer. Always to busy, you've all heard that before! Anyway, I am loving being back in the saddle again, the wind in the hair, the pain in the legs, the sweat in the eyes and that wonderful feeling of being out of breath - it's great!

So I've gotten in pretty good shape again and have lost a decent amount of weight. I have to travel farther and farther to get a good workout in, so the MTB is not so great anymore. Pushing it through the streets is not so much fun anymore, so I purchased a Miyata road bike, a 90 Miyata 1400 AlumiTech - which of course has down tube shifters. It should be here this week.

So am I crazy? Will I be able to handle down tube shifting again after so many years away from one? I have to tell you, I'm abit nervous about it. Getting back into city traffic was tough enough on the MTB with handlebar shifters, but down tube is another story I think.

What do you guys think?
You poor soul, heh heh. Yah, it'll be quite different than the MTB. Hopefully it's notched like a Trek or others, then get used to it.
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Old 08-08-11, 09:37 AM
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You will be fine.
However, I did the same thing last fall. Same age. Got my old Cannondale out. Downtube shifters and all. After 6 months on it, I decided it was time for something new. Got a bike with brifters. Now my left arm isn't sore after riding
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Old 08-08-11, 10:02 AM
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Originally Posted by bigbadwullf View Post
You will be fine.
However, I did the same thing last fall. Same age. Got my old Cannondale out. Downtube shifters and all. After 6 months on it, I decided it was time for something new. Got a bike with brifters. Now my left arm isn't sore after riding
Don't want to be fussy, Mr Wulf, but

Left arm sore?

Typo?
Had to hold on tighter when you shifted with the right hand for rear cassette?
Did most of your shifting between rings?

I don't doubt what you say. On an oldschool tandem, my left arm and shoulder got really tired controlling the thing whilst fishing for gears - second option above
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Old 08-08-11, 10:05 AM
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Lots more shifting of rear deraileur. Rear deralieur shifter is on the right side. Had to hold my weight with left arm while shifting.
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Old 08-08-11, 10:19 AM
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From all I've read, it should indexed. Shimano 105 equipped, 1990.

Just for kicks, when I get so darn good with the DTS, can it be it be easily adjusted to go from index to friction and back again? (See, I'm already exuding confidence!)I've heard that some can.
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Old 08-08-11, 10:29 AM
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Giacomo, I think you were smart to pick up that Miyata. I doubt that DT shifters will be a problem for you since you were using them in the past.

DT's and bar end shifters are still my favorite means of shifting.

Welcome to the 50+ forum.
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Old 08-08-11, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Louis View Post
Giacomo, I think you were smart to pick up that Miyata. I doubt that DT shifters will be a problem for you since you were using them in the past.

DT's and bar end shifters are still my favorite means of shifting.

Welcome to the 50+ forum.
After having brifters I will never go back.
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Old 08-08-11, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by bigbadwullf View Post
Lots more shifting of rear deraileur. Rear deralieur shifter is on the right side. Had to hold my weight with left arm while shifting.
swarrithort
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Old 08-08-11, 11:10 AM
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Downtube shifters do not take that much skill. I was able to do it. Of course, it is easier to shift with shifters in the hoods. It is a matter of timing. Grabbing a water bottle and drinking is more involved than shifting using downtube shifters. Barend shifters are really good. I have used them once (a rental bike on a bike tour). I was wondering what the learning curve was before I tried it. I think it took me about 4 shifts to pick it up and I am not the most accomplished guy on this sort of thing by any measure.
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Old 08-08-11, 12:00 PM
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Yes, you are nuts. Most of us on BF50+ are. You'll fit in well.

No, you shouldn't have any problems with down tube shifters.
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Old 08-08-11, 12:27 PM
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Woooohoooooo!!!

Guess who just knocked on the door?

Yes, that nice, nice man in the brown uniform, and he had a big box in his hands. Yes, my Miyata 1400A in pearl white is here!

Alright, I've got to go now and put her together. Geez, I'm so excited, it's scary....

And thanks for the welcomes guys, it's great to be here!
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Old 08-08-11, 12:41 PM
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We're gonna need pics.
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Old 08-08-11, 06:23 PM
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Well, what a beauty she is!

Took her out of the box and gave her a good going over and darn if it isn't in beautiful shape. Very few scratches or scruffs, paint still shining, tires are very good and the Shimano 105 equipment looks first rate. I got her all together in about 20 minutes or so and took her for a spin. Well what can I say except woooohoooo all over again! What a thrill to be back on a bonified road bike again with down tube friction shifting! Hardly had any problems finding the gear or leaving the handlebar for the shifter. For now, I think I can say that DTS will not be a problem with alittle bit of practice. Am I relieved!

But I must now avoid those pesky NYC potholes with a vengeance! I'm not on an MTB anymore!

Pictured will be forethcoming, I promise.

Thanks for the support here, you'll probably hear from me often
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Old 08-08-11, 06:30 PM
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Friction, eh? You really went old-school, didn't you? Hope you didn't have a hard time dusting off your trimming skills.
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