Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-16-11, 11:17 AM   #1
VertigoFlyer
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
VertigoFlyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Balmy Snoqualmie WA
Bikes: 2011 Trek Madone 5.2, 2010 Trek Fuel EX 8
Posts: 172
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My Damn FEET!

I bet this is a frequent topic here so please forgive me for revisiting it.

My Damn FEET HURT after some 20 miles of happy miles on my bike. I am currently using my Pearl Izumi mtn bike shoes with Shimano A520 SPD pedals. This is more out of convenience than forethought since I've been doing more mtb than road prior to my breaking my right humerous in 4 places last June. Because of that injury I'm staying clear of the singletrack and enjoying LOTS of road time!

Anyway my damn feet start hurting/falling asleep as mentioned above. Sometimes I kick out of my pedals and shake the hell out of them while coasting down the road. This sorta helps but only for a brief few minutes. Stopping and walking around helps but that gets old real fast.

At my age I prefer to avoid anything that includes "gets old real fast" - DOH!!

I've been doing some reading online and am seeing that using a more proper road pedal and matching shoes would be a good thing. Alrighty, but there is a HUGE span in pricing for road shoes! Holy Moly! Giro's Factor shoes look good on paper but that price tag is scary! On the other end of the price scale is Shimano's R087G which seems to be a good shoe.

My Pearl Izumi's have been great for mtb riding but I never do the kind of mileage on dirt that I do on pavement. So I never went far enough to feel the PAIN.

My question is, is there anything I might be doing wrong that would be fixable before I lay down a bit of cash for new shoes/pedals? For the curious I am looking at buying Shimano's Ultegra PD-6700
pedals. This would complete my Ultegra group on my Madone and they are getting good reviews on the internet...

An interesting side note is I was a hopeless ski bum in an earlier life. Back then I saw no issues at all in laying down some $300.00 for a pair of uber awesome ski boots. Why am I so hesitant to do the same for my road bike time? Very curious indeed....
VertigoFlyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 11:24 AM   #2
NOS88
Senior Member
 
NOS88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Montgomery County, Pennsylvania
Bikes:
Posts: 6,490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If they're "falling asleep" I would suspect shoes that are too tight. First thing I would try is thinner socks and not tightening whatever closure mechanism that is on the shoe as tight as you have been. It won't cost you anything.
__________________
A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. - S. Wright
Favorite rides in the stable: Indy Fab CJ Ti - Colnago MXL - S-Works Roubaix - Habanero Team Issue - Jamis Eclipse carbon/831
NOS88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 11:32 AM   #3
gcottay
Senior Member
 
gcottay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Green Valley AZ
Bikes: Trice Q; Volae Century; TT 3.4
Posts: 3,772
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You might also think about your pedal stroke. I find the "scraping off mud" approach to pedaling in more of a circle not only recruits some additional muscles but also provides foot relief on longer rides.
gcottay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 12:32 PM   #4
Nightshade
Humvee of bikes =Worksman
 
Nightshade's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 5,363
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by VertigoFlyer View Post
I bet this is a frequent topic here so please forgive me for revisiting it.

My Damn FEET HURT after some 20 miles of happy miles on my bike. I am currently using my Pearl Izumi mtn bike shoes with Shimano A520 SPD pedals. This is more out of convenience than forethought since I've been doing more mtb than road prior to my breaking my right humerous in 4 places last June. Because of that injury I'm staying clear of the singletrack and enjoying LOTS of road time!

Anyway my damn feet start hurting/falling asleep as mentioned above. Sometimes I kick out of my pedals and shake the hell out of them while coasting down the road. This sorta helps but only for a brief few minutes. Stopping and walking around helps but that gets old real fast.
It may be very possible that your injury changed your leg geometry and stress load too the point that you can no longer ride in clips. A simple way to tell is install a pair of simple platform pedals on your bike then take a test ride. If your feet are ok then you NEED the ability to have 100% free floating feet during the ride as a result of your injury.
__________________
My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
Nightshade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 12:42 PM   #5
Nightshade
Humvee of bikes =Worksman
 
Nightshade's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 5,363
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
It may be very possible that your injury changed your leg geometry and stress load too the point that you can no longer ride in clips. A simple way to tell is install a pair of simple platform pedals on your bike then take a test ride. If your feet are ok then you NEED the ability to have 100% free floating feet during the ride as a result of your injury.
P.S. Foot numbness &/or pain is also a symptom of Diabetes. Have you been checked for Diabetes.??????
__________________
My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
Nightshade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 01:04 PM   #6
RonH
Life is good
 
RonH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Not far from the Withlacoochee Trail. 🚴🏻
Bikes: 2001 Litespeed Tuscany and 2014 Cannondale SuperSix EVO Hi-Mod
Posts: 17,688
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 382 Post(s)
I too was having foot problems on long rides with Look pedals. Last spring (2010) I switched to Shimano SPD-SL pedals. The wider platform is just what my feet needed.
Shoes? I have wide feet so have been riding with a Sidi Genius mega shoes since 2006.
__________________
The LORD is merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and plenteous in mercy. - Psalm 103:8
RonH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 01:05 PM   #7
leob1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Middle of the road, NJ
Bikes:
Posts: 2,757
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 111 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
It may be very possible that your injury changed your leg geometry and stress load too the point that you can no longer ride in clips. A simple way to tell is install a pair of simple platform pedals on your bike then take a test ride. If your feet are ok then you NEED the ability to have 100% free floating feet during the ride as a result of your injury.
You may not need 100% float, but you may not have your cleats on the shoe in the correct position for you. You just may need you heel out or in a few(or more) degrees. When you ride is your foot contsantly under tension, like you are just about to unclip? That's a sign of a misaligned cleat. Try riding with platform pedals, take notice how your feet naturally fall on the pedals. Toes pointing in or out? Do your cycling shoes point the same way when you are clipped in?
Or maybe the shoes just don't fit the shape of your foot. Different manufactures use different lasts(forms) to build the shoe around. And the sizes can vary. I go to a shop that has a good variety of shoes, from different manufacturers, and a good shoe fittter. Plan on trying on several different types. You'll feel the diference, and know which is right for you.
leob1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 01:11 PM   #8
BluesDawg
just keep riding
 
BluesDawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Milledgeville, Georgia
Bikes: 2018 All-City Cosmic Stallion, 2017 Niner Jet 9 Alloy, 2015 Specialized AWOL Comp frameset (custom build), 2015 Zukas custom road, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB, 1980ish Fuji S-12S
Posts: 13,421
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 107 Post(s)
Although I am a big fan of true road pedals and shoes, there is nothing about the type of pedals and shoes you are using that should cause the pain and numbness you are experiencing. I have done century rides with SPD A520 pedals and Shimano sandals with no real foot discomfort. Yes, SPD-SL pedals are even better for road riding, especially for very long rides, but not drastically better, especially in 20 miles.

Barring some kind of structural change due to your injury, my first guess would be that your shoes are too tight.
BluesDawg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 01:33 PM   #9
marmot
Senior Member
 
marmot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Ottawa
Bikes: Kona Dew Drop, Specialized Expedition Sport
Posts: 439
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If your shoes fit OK, this should not happen. I spent five hours on my bike this morning, wearing Pearl Izumi MTB shoes, with no discomfort at all. In fact, I just noticed I still have the shoes on. They'e so comfy I forgot to take them off when I got home. Try the thinner sox idea, don't cinch 'em up so tight, maybe try platform pedals and -- failing that -- see if your doctor can find a reason for your problems. Hope it works out for you.
marmot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 01:43 PM   #10
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee
Posts: 3,798
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 458 Post(s)
There are (at least) two possible causes for your hot foot. As previous posters have suggested, the PI shoes may be tight around the ball of your foot (possibly because the feet are swelling during long rides). Loosen the front closure(s) or find a shoe with a wider last at the front to correct.

The second cause would be that the sole isn't stiff enough, and you're getting pressure in the center of your foot. You might try moving the cleats back a bit and see if that fixes things. If not, I'd recommend you bit the bullet and buy some Sidi MTB shoes. Dominators are pricey (unless you can find your size on close-out), and I don't know if they're still making the Giau, but either model should be stiff enough to fix your problem. OTOH, they'll last forever if you don't push a loaded touring bike up almost every hill in Virginia and Kentucky while wearing them!
pdlamb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 01:44 PM   #11
CbadRider
Senior Member
 
CbadRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: On the bridge with Picard
Bikes: Specialized Allez, Specialized Sirrus
Posts: 5,963
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by BluesDawg View Post
Barring some kind of structural change due to your injury, my first guess would be that your shoes are too tight.
+1 When my feet start to get numb/painful after riding for a while, I loosen my shoes and it helps a lot. My shoes aren't tight to begin with, but the swelling during the ride makes my shoes tight.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xerum 525 View Post
Now get on your cheap bike and give me a double century. You walking can of Crisco!!

Forum Guidelines *click here*
CbadRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 02:28 PM   #12
prathmann
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Bikes:
Posts: 6,732
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 414 Post(s)
In addition to checking the cleat position and that your shoes aren't too tight, you might try adding some sole inserts to your shoes.

I had similar issues when I got some new MTB shoes - they felt fine for the first 15 miles or so but on longer rides my feet would start to fall asleep and hurt. A pair of cheap inserts cured the problem.
prathmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 03:11 PM   #13
JohnJ80
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Minnesota
Bikes: N+1=5
Posts: 3,335
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 251 Post(s)
Then, there is the issue of your foot being flat on the peddle. I have that problem and have to use 3 bikefit wedges under my left cleat to not have considerable pain in my foot. Also, I've gone to the Specialized footbeds in my bike shoes with the metatarsal button and that has made a big difference too.

So, I'd look at it as

(1) shoe fit/strap tightness.
(2) cant
(3) footbeds.

j.

J.
JohnJ80 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 04:10 PM   #14
big john
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Bikes:
Posts: 11,788
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 112 Post(s)
I've used those shoes and pedals for 1000's of mile on the road without foot problems. If the shoes aren't too tight, the cleats might be positioned wrong and causing pressure.
I switched them to mtb only use and I added Superfeet insoles to them.
big john is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 04:40 PM   #15
Wogster
Senior Member
 
Wogster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Toronto (again) Ontario, Canada
Bikes: Norco Bushpilot (out of commission), Raleigh Delta
Posts: 6,938
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
It may be very possible that your injury changed your leg geometry and stress load too the point that you can no longer ride in clips. A simple way to tell is install a pair of simple platform pedals on your bike then take a test ride. If your feet are ok then you NEED the ability to have 100% free floating feet during the ride as a result of your injury.
The humerus is the bone that runs between the shoulder and the elbow, so there is no way that, it would cause a saddle related issue. One thing I noted after breaking mine, there is nothing humorous about a broken humerus, mine took a couple of Titanium plates and about 300 screws to hold it together while it healed, so I know.

Feet going to sleep, probably too tight shoes, there are a few things that work against us here....

1) Most bike shoes are Euro-sized, and conversion charts range from pretty close to completely out to lunch.
2) Your shoe size can change over time, you need to have your size checked once in a while, in a shoe store.
3) Shoe sizes are like bicycle sizes, every manufacturer uses a different length ruler.
Wogster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 04:47 PM   #16
VertigoFlyer
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
VertigoFlyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Balmy Snoqualmie WA
Bikes: 2011 Trek Madone 5.2, 2010 Trek Fuel EX 8
Posts: 172
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
thanks folks for all the awesome feedback! This is why I like Bike Forum so much and the 50+ group in particular!

I am already using super feet inserts and those typically feel great under my feet. I have some on right now in the Keen sandals on my feet sit tin here outside Starbucks.

My next ride I will loosen up the PI shoes and see what that does.

Next step will be to consider adjusting the cleat positions.

We will also be stopping by REI which has the above mentioned Shimano shoe in stock that I am interested in.

I'm giving serious consideration to a professional bike fit. This will be done by a physical therapist who specializes in this kind of thing. It can only help. The only drawback is the $150.00 check I'll need to write...

Again thank you folks for the awesome feedback! y'all rock!!
VertigoFlyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 05:09 PM   #17
kr32
Senior Member
 
kr32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Waldorf Md.
Bikes: Cannondale Six Carbon 5 and Gary Fisher Wahoo
Posts: 2,045
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by BluesDawg View Post
my first guess would be that your shoes are too tight.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOS88 View Post
If they're "falling asleep" I would suspect shoes that are too tight. First thing I would try is thinner socks and not tightening whatever closure mechanism that is on the shoe as tight as you have been. It won't cost you anything.
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmot View Post
Try the thinner sox idea, don't cinch 'em up so tight
My feet used to do that as well but I got a different shoe that had a larger toe box and did all the above.
My guess is your shoes are too tight and there is no circulation in your toes.
kr32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 05:16 PM   #18
JohnJ80
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Minnesota
Bikes: N+1=5
Posts: 3,335
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 251 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by VertigoFlyer View Post
thanks folks for all the awesome feedback! This is why I like Bike Forum so much and the 50+ group in particular!

I am already using super feet inserts and those typically feel great under my feet. I have some on right now in the Keen sandals on my feet sit tin here outside Starbucks.

My next ride I will loosen up the PI shoes and see what that does.

Next step will be to consider adjusting the cleat positions.

We will also be stopping by REI which has the above mentioned Shimano shoe in stock that I am interested in.

I'm giving serious consideration to a professional bike fit. This will be done by a physical therapist who specializes in this kind of thing. It can only help. The only drawback is the $150.00 check I'll need to write...

Again thank you folks for the awesome feedback! y'all rock!!
^^^ This is the place to start if you are going to be doing it anyhow.

J.
JohnJ80 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 05:32 PM   #19
qmsdc15
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Maryland
Bikes: rockhopper, delta V, cannondale H300, Marin Mill Valley
Posts: 5,155
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
It may be very possible that your injury changed your leg geometry and stress load too the point that you can no longer ride in clips. A simple way to tell is install a pair of simple platform pedals on your bike then take a test ride. If your feet are ok then you NEED the ability to have 100% free floating feet during the ride as a result of your injury.
Some clipless pedals allow more float than platform pedals. Speedplay, Time ATAC, Crank Brothers, for example. I know nothing about road pedals, but if they don't offer 100% free float, stick with the MTB pedals!

Try SPD sandals. Thank me later.
qmsdc15 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 10:08 PM   #20
VertigoFlyer
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
VertigoFlyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Balmy Snoqualmie WA
Bikes: 2011 Trek Madone 5.2, 2010 Trek Fuel EX 8
Posts: 172
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
OK so I want to clarify this concept of float. Does this refer to allowing the foot some room to swing left/right within the clip?
VertigoFlyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 10:41 PM   #21
TheHen
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 790
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you are clenching your feet while riding instead of letting them relax at some point in each revolution you can adversely affect the circulation just as though you had your shoes too tight. Perversely, this is sometimes caused by having too much float in one's pedals.
TheHen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-11, 11:19 PM   #22
zonatandem
Senior Member
 
zonatandem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Tucson, AZ
Bikes: Custom Zona c/f tandem + Scott Plasma single
Posts: 10,987
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 61 Post(s)
A bit of retro advice:
Get pedals with mt. bike toeclips and use non-cleated touring shoes that are wide/long enough for your feet.
zonatandem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-11, 09:46 PM   #23
VertigoFlyer
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
VertigoFlyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Balmy Snoqualmie WA
Bikes: 2011 Trek Madone 5.2, 2010 Trek Fuel EX 8
Posts: 172
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Today's ride was better. I loosened up the velcro and rachet straps on my PI shoes. Initially this seemed like a great fix. But after about 15 miles the pain was back. Less this time but still really annoying. If I take my shoes out of the SPD clips and pedal with the pedal axle under the arch of my foot that does feel better, no more pain.
VertigoFlyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-11, 10:16 PM   #24
VertigoFlyer
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
VertigoFlyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Balmy Snoqualmie WA
Bikes: 2011 Trek Madone 5.2, 2010 Trek Fuel EX 8
Posts: 172
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My next step is to move my SPD cleats back a bit and try that out. My goal is to try the easy fixes first before getting into spending money.
VertigoFlyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-11, 10:26 PM   #25
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
Posts: 12,946
Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 844 Post(s)
Could also be something to do with saddle or saddle height. Try dropping it a half-centimeter. Do you pedal heels-down? Your saddle should be at a height where you have your foot level at the bottom of the stroke and still have a little bend in your knee. It should feel like your heel is lower than your toe, though it probably won't be. With your butt level on the saddle and your bike shoe heel on the pedal, your knee should exactly lock out at the bottom of the stroke. Only pedal with your heel cups. Never push down with the ball of your foot, except when standing.

Sounds to me like maybe a foot problem. Try cross training with some long fast walks in tennies or runners.
Carbonfiberboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:46 AM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION