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Idiot biker on rail-trail

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Idiot biker on rail-trail

Old 09-21-11, 09:55 AM
  #51  
alcanoe
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Originally Posted by NOS88 View Post
Come on, Al. Having had someone do that to me thinking it was funny leads me to say, it's not.

You unfortunately read my post before I caught my error about double track. Sorry about that. On the "stick in the spokes", I like it.

I and my wife have been startled by people almost brushing us as they pass on single track where there's a drop-off yet that it endangers us. These people need feed back and I have been commenting as they go by. I do carry self-defense means by the way. We started doing that years ago when the crime/violence rate went up on the Appalachian trail.

Al
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Old 09-21-11, 01:21 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by UberGeek View Post
I know the MUP's 'round these parts do. 15mph. I'm trying every day to get a speeding ticket on there, but not quite there yet
You don't "really" want the ticket, just the bragging rights. Remember when people were complaining about speeding tickets in Central Park. Of course, one can definitely get over 25mph around the bend by the pool and on the west side flats/rolls.
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Old 09-21-11, 02:16 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by Wogster View Post
The ones I love are when you get places, like near the Humber River Bridge, where it says, "Bicycles use this path <-, walkers and joggers use this path -> ", cyclists and people on bikes, seem to be able to figure this out, joggers, almost always use the bicycle path, even when the walking/jogging path is completely empty, even when they are the same paving surface.
Around London you get some truly boneheaded people. Over here cycle lanes are often green and for good measure almost always have pictures of bicycles on them. So if you've got a footpath and a cyclepath side by side one side will have pictures of a bicycle on it (as well as often being green) and still you find people letting small children play in the cyclepath.

Needless to say they usually seem to think that cyclists are the ones who are out of line for cycling on the cyclepath for any response other than stopping, walking gingerly around the small child, and then resuming.
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Old 09-21-11, 03:56 PM
  #54  
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sknhgy..... there is nothing on the trail that ticks me off more than 2 riders approaching side by side and and not moving over. Thank you!
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Old 09-21-11, 05:05 PM
  #55  
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In my experience anyone riding a path and thnking they were fast wasn't.

I have met some roadies on paths that thought they were going slow when they wer not however.

But most of the roadies on paths I have seen are going slow enough. Of course all the paths I can thnik of with any length have good scenery.
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Old 09-21-11, 09:51 PM
  #56  
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Came up behind a young couple riding side by side on our MUP today. I was in no particular hurry and we were turning into a park anyway so I just decided to follow along riding easy. After a minute or two I decided to go by and called "on your left, please". Left ride rider, the female, moved immediately to the right and issued very polite and profuse apology as I went by. My reply: "it's okay, no problem, thanks..."

Result= nice good feelings with fellow cyclists. I was not temped in any way to shoot between them. My ride may have taken 10 seconds longer.
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Old 09-21-11, 09:59 PM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by CB HI View Post
So did you learn your lesson to stay in the right lane/side of the trail as you are suppose to?
What he said! Especially when bicycling SO SLOW>>>>
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Old 09-21-11, 11:51 PM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by okane View Post
Was riding about 12-13 mph on my local MUP and came upon a senior citizen couple riding side by side. They didn't hear me coming and I had to say out loud, "passing left!" They moved over quickly but I had to slow down a bit. Boy was I PO'd! They must have cost me 2 - 3 seconds! I should have "shot the gap" between them and if grandma got dumped, she deserved it for wasting so much of my precious time! They were probably riding Huffys anyway.
Your satire makes a very good point that it was not the cyclist that was passing that came onto BF's to rant with a post titled "Idiot biker on rail-trail". Apparently that cyclist simply passed other cyclist without a collision and enjoyed his ride.
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Old 09-22-11, 12:34 AM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by contango View Post
Lame comparison.

Coming down the mountains on a road with two lanes in each direction I'll use the full width of both lanes to make turning easier. But I only do that if there's no other traffic around - if there are other cars then I stick to one lane and slow down more if I need to.

When I'm driving in the forest if I can see the road is empty I'll often drive down the middle if conditions aren't good. If there are any other road users around I'll stick to my own lane.

Likewise on a road if I'm cycling with someone I'll ride two abreast so I can talk to them. If the presence of other road users makes it antisocial then we'll single out to let them pass and when conditions permit go back to riding two abreast.

If I'm in my back yard I might shoot my rifle at a target at the other end of the yard. But if the guy cutting the grass is cutting the grass I might hold off until he's finished cutting before I start shooting.

It's about behaving in a way appropriate to prevailing conditions rather than simply figuring something is inherently bad even if there's clearly no harm in doing it at any given time.
We're not really in disagreement. Before you move to the incorrect side of the road you make sure it is clear. The OP was riding on the wrong side of the road but was negligent in checking the local environment. Who cares how many abreast folks ride when there is no possible conflict with other road users? However, wrong side riders do assume the burden of vigilance. (Strangely enough, the laws in my state simultaneously require vehicles to maintain their lanes and allow for operating over the center line, albeit with no right-of-way.)

Of course, the OP's mistake pales in comparison to the unsafe pass by the "idiot".
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Old 09-22-11, 11:49 AM
  #60  
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I can understand people walking or cycling side by side on the MUP. They want to be able to talk to each other.

When I first started riding on MUP's I said "On your left" and immediately started to pass a pedestrian. She moved to the left and I had to leave the trail surface to pass without hitting her. Fortunately, for me, there was nothing in the way and I was able to pass without incident.

Now, when I come up from behind I slow down and say "passing on you left". I wait for them to move to the right and then I pass. I always say "Thank you" as I pass them. Works much better for all involved.
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Old 09-22-11, 06:56 PM
  #61  
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I don't think we are arguing rules so much as we are common sense. You see two people riding side by side, ring a bell or call out. We are out there to enjoy ourselves and errors happen due to the slow pace. So plan for it.
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Old 09-22-11, 07:51 PM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by B. Carfree View Post
We're not really in disagreement. Before you move to the incorrect side of the road you make sure it is clear. The OP was riding on the wrong side of the road but was negligent in checking the local environment. Who cares how many abreast folks ride when there is no possible conflict with other road users? However, wrong side riders do assume the burden of vigilance. (Strangely enough, the laws in my state simultaneously require vehicles to maintain their lanes and allow for operating over the center line, albeit with no right-of-way.)

Of course, the OP's mistake pales in comparison to the unsafe pass by the "idiot".
Sure, if someone is riding two abreast you need to give them chance to move out of the way before you just blow past them.

I remember a time I was riding a local canal towpath with a friend, not quite side-by-side because there wasn't room but certainly taking most of the width of the path. Then I noticed someone behind me, so pulled aside to let him get past. He hadn't said a word, hadn't rung his bell, just figured it was a shared path so he'd go slower until someone moved over.

Personally I'd have rung my bell to let people know I was wanting to get past, but you can't fault the guy behind me for good manners.
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Old 09-23-11, 11:31 PM
  #63  
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[QUOTE=dayjack119;13265351]I don't think we are arguing rules so much as we are common sense. You see two people riding side by side, ring a bell or call out. We are out there to enjoy ourselves and errors happen due to the slow pace. So plan for it.[/QUOTE]

Nope. If there is no minimum speed riding slow is not an error. It is a choice not to be criticized by anyone else.
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Old 09-24-11, 06:02 AM
  #64  
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"On your left" causes many to move left when they are being overtaken.

Whatever happened to "TRACK"? It is easy to yell. Better than the often mumbled "on your left" and easier to hear.
It comes from cross country skiing.
It could be printed with an explanation on the signs at trailheads.
I combine it with a brass bell.
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Old 09-24-11, 06:06 AM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by CHAS View Post
"On your left" causes many to move left when they are being overtaken.

Whatever happened to "TRACK"? It is easy to yell. Better than the often mumbled "on your left" and easier to hear.
It comes from cross country skiing.
It could be printed with an explanation on the signs at trailheads.
I combine it with a brass bell.
Track would be confusing to many, even with an explanation.

I find "passing" to be the best in my area.
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Old 09-24-11, 06:36 AM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by CHAS View Post
"On your left" causes many to move left when they are being overtaken.

Whatever happened to "TRACK"? It is easy to yell. Better than the often mumbled "on your left" and easier to hear.
It comes from cross country skiing.
It could be printed with an explanation on the signs at trailheads.
I combine it with a brass bell.

What are the chances that someone that can't understand "on your left" would know what to do when someone yells "TRACK!"? I'm guessing the people on my trail would look around for a train...
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Old 09-24-11, 02:14 PM
  #67  
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After all this I am left with the idea that the 3rd rider, the passing rider, was unsafe because there was no adequate warning, no slowing to see what the overtaken were going to do and passed in the wrong place.

Face it. The vast majority of people riding bicycles are not subscribers to this forum. They most likely don't belong to any cycling group. They haven't had any lessons on "bicycling etiquette", whatever that is. They are riding for pleasure and bring with them all the other emotional and physical burdens of life.

With that in mind I find it best to assume anyone I pass is deaf, has limited vision, marginally capable of controlling their bike and may even be antisocial and looking for a way to vent their aggressions. Too often my assumptions have proven to be at least in part true.

I've tried yelling various phrases with varying degrees of success. The best way I've found to prevent a collision is to be prepared to stop your bike at any moment if there are unknown people around. Even if that means putting the bike down. Better a collision with the ground than with another bike and rider.
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Old 09-24-11, 02:33 PM
  #68  
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Originally Posted by HawkOwl View Post
After all this I am left with the idea that the 3rd rider, the passing rider, was unsafe because there was no adequate warning, no slowing to see what the overtaken were going to do and passed in the wrong place.

Face it. The vast majority of people riding bicycles are not subscribers to this forum. They most likely don't belong to any cycling group. They haven't had any lessons on "bicycling etiquette", whatever that is. They are riding for pleasure and bring with them all the other emotional and physical burdens of life.

With that in mind I find it best to assume anyone I pass is deaf, has limited vision, marginally capable of controlling their bike and may even be antisocial and looking for a way to vent their aggressions. Too often my assumptions have proven to be at least in part true.

I've tried yelling various phrases with varying degrees of success. The best way I've found to prevent a collision is to be prepared to stop your bike at any moment if there are unknown people around. Even if that means putting the bike down. Better a collision with the ground than with another bike and rider.
Add using a bell to this and you have got a realistic assessment of the situation on the bike trails.
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Old 09-24-11, 03:16 PM
  #69  
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Originally Posted by Toeslider View Post
What are the chances that someone that can't understand "on your left" would know what to do when someone yells "TRACK!"? I'm guessing the people on my trail would look around for a train...
I for one would have no idea what that was supposed to mean. Why add more confusion into the mix?
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Old 09-24-11, 08:59 PM
  #70  
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I don't know who reads this forum, but "on your left" or "passing left please" works just fine here. You can always show a little patience and ease off and wait to see what people do when you call out of course.
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Old 09-24-11, 11:04 PM
  #71  
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Originally Posted by HawkOwl View Post
The best way I've found to prevent a collision is to be prepared to stop your bike at any moment if there are unknown people around. Even if that means putting the bike down. Better a collision with the ground than with another bike and rider.
Not advice that I am going to follow.
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Old 09-25-11, 07:02 AM
  #72  
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Originally Posted by HawkOwl View Post
After all this I am left with the idea that the 3rd rider, the passing rider, was unsafe because there was no adequate warning, no slowing to see what the overtaken were going to do and passed in the wrong place.

Face it. The vast majority of people riding bicycles are not subscribers to this forum. They most likely don't belong to any cycling group. They haven't had any lessons on "bicycling etiquette", whatever that is. They are riding for pleasure and bring with them all the other emotional and physical burdens of life.
I've taken to assuming that people are either unable or uninterested in getting out of the way unless they need to. So many people walk around with personal stereos these days it's not surprising they can't hear anything.

I've tried yelling various phrases with varying degrees of success. The best way I've found to prevent a collision is to be prepared to stop your bike at any moment if there are unknown people around. Even if that means putting the bike down. Better a collision with the ground than with another bike and rider.
Personally I don't think I'd turn a collision with someone being stupid into a one-man collision where I hit something immovable in a hurry. I'd rather not hit a pedestrian on my bike but if they're doing something boneheaded that causes me to crash (as opposed to me being boneheaded and buzzing them) then I'd rather they took some of the consequences.
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Old 09-25-11, 07:21 AM
  #73  
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Originally Posted by contango View Post
Personally I don't think I'd turn a collision with someone being stupid into a one-man collision where I hit something immovable in a hurry. I'd rather not hit a pedestrian on my bike but if they're doing something boneheaded that causes me to crash (as opposed to me being boneheaded and buzzing them) then I'd rather they took some of the consequences.
Around here, horses have the prime right-of-way, with peds 2nd and bicycles a lowly 3rd. And it is posted that way. If one were riding a bicycle and hit a ped, no matter how stupind the ped was, the bicyclist is going to be at fault, or at least partly at fault, in court.
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Old 09-25-11, 04:24 PM
  #74  
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Originally Posted by contango View Post
I've taken to assuming that people are either unable or uninterested in getting out of the way unless they need to. So many people walk around with personal stereos these days it's not surprising they can't hear anything.



Personally I don't think I'd turn a collision with someone being stupid into a one-man collision where I hit something immovable in a hurry. I'd rather not hit a pedestrian on my bike but if they're doing something boneheaded that causes me to crash (as opposed to me being boneheaded and buzzing them) then I'd rather they took some of the consequences.
Certainly most of the time it is your choice. But, think about it. First, getting tangled in the wreckage of multiple bikes and people is nasty at best. Most likely better to impact the ground and take a bit of rash in the process. Especially since you should have been slowing in anticipation of the unexpected as you pass. Second, I'm not an expert on every state's laws. But, the bikes or people being overtaken have the right of way in every state I'm familiar with. You hit them and you pay for their injuries and property damage plus.
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Old 09-25-11, 10:25 PM
  #75  
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Originally Posted by DnvrFox View Post
Around here, horses have the prime right-of-way, with peds 2nd and bicycles a lowly 3rd. And it is posted that way. If one were riding a bicycle and hit a ped, no matter how stupind the ped was, the bicyclist is going to be at fault, or at least partly at fault, in court.
It's a wee bit different here. Bike paths are defined as roads, not sidewalks. On a road with no sidewalk a pedestrian has no right-of-way in OR, therefore a collision between a cyclist and a pedestrian would default to the pedestrian being at fault. I would like your state's system better if they would take it to the next level and impose strict liability on motor vehicles too.

I would take it as an extreme failure on my part if I ever struck a pedestrian or a cyclist whom I was passing. If I can't control my bike and mood well enough to avoid hitting people then I need to seek out the appropriate help irregardless of who is legally at fault. I'm not above being annoyed at pedestrian critical mass formations on the bike paths, but running into people when I am perfectly capable of avoiding them is just anti-social, at least in my opinion.
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