Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

Anyone around during the Bike Boom of the 1970s? Tell me about your story!

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

Anyone around during the Bike Boom of the 1970s? Tell me about your story!

Old 10-21-16, 11:45 PM
  #226  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 515
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 213 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 21 Posts
I was a bike boomer who wasn't aware of the boom. Loved biking as a kid on heavyweights and sting rays. Didn't have much money in college, but was surprised by a gift from my mom that was enough to buy a new Centurion Super LeMans in 1975. It was just under $200 tax and all with an upgraded Cyclone rear derail. I still have that bike and am doing a mild restore following my son making a fixed gear out of it.


After getting the Centurion, I got toe clips and straps immediately and started riding with cycling shoes and cleats soon after. My college, University of Missouri-Columbia, had an annual campus team relay cycling race. My team was of independents competing against fraternity teams. My team raced 4 times and got two 1sts, and two 2nds. I also raced in one road race in the amateur category and got 5th.


The first 10 speeds I saw resulted in awe. Before that I was in awe of "English Racers" My brother had one that I got to ride some. I'd say I back burnered bikes for cars and girls from the age of 16 to 21 when I got the Centurion.


I didn't know there was a fad going on. Most of the people who were riding were riding to classes and some professors. Mainly to beat the parking problems.
Lakerat is offline  
Old 10-22-16, 03:01 AM
  #227  
Senior Member
 
trailangel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Pasadena, CA
Posts: 4,848

Bikes: Schwinn Varsity

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1931 Post(s)
Liked 742 Times in 422 Posts
I don't recall ever seeing older people riding bikes in the seventies. It was mostly the 20 year olds that crew up on bikes.
Now I see a lot of old people on bikes.. me included.
Schwinn Varsity, Centurion Lemans, Raleigh Grand Prix, Peugeot PX10E. Those were my bikes.
trailangel is offline  
Old 10-22-16, 09:34 AM
  #228  
Senior Member
 
Loose Chain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 2,067

Bikes: 84 Pinarello Trevisio, 86 Guerciotti SLX, 96 Specialized Stumpjumper, 2010 Surly Cross Check, 88 Centurion Prestige, 73 Raleigh Sports, GT Force, Bridgestone MB4

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 278 Post(s)
Liked 71 Times in 56 Posts
Originally Posted by trailangel
I don't recall ever seeing older people riding bikes in the seventies. It was mostly the 20 year olds that crew up on bikes.
Now I see a lot of old people on bikes.. me included.
Schwinn Varsity, Centurion Lemans, Raleigh Grand Prix, Peugeot PX10E. Those were my bikes.

Yes, the same people who in the 70s were on bikes are still on bikes or returning to them now that they are older. I rarely saw older people from the "Greatest" generation on bicycles. My grandfather, "Interbellum" generation, had a bike, but he would have seen the end of the first bike boom as a child and did like bicycles and did ride one for some minor transport or a spin around the neighborhood. The old people now on bikes are "Boomers". Reading about the generations is interesting.

One of the things that killed the boom, one of several, bike theft. And bike theft continues to be a damper on use of a bicycle for anything other than sporting use. Some cultures stone thieves or cut their hands off. I am not for that but perhaps like every Saturday afternoon place the new thieves caught by the men in blue in like a big fenced arena and then give all the spectators air powered bean bag guns and we get to bob them with bean bags for thirty minutes. Instead of jail time or a record---.

J

Last edited by Loose Chain; 10-22-16 at 09:40 AM.
Loose Chain is offline  
Old 10-22-16, 05:15 PM
  #229  
The Infractionator
 
AlexCyclistRoch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 2,201

Bikes: Classic road bikes: 1986 Cannondale, 1978 Trek

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 875 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
FWIW, you would more often see women of my parent's generation riding 'town cruiser' bikes of the period than you would see men riding bikes. My mother occasionally used my sister's Schwinn cruiser.
AlexCyclistRoch is offline  
Old 10-23-16, 10:34 PM
  #230  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 167

Bikes: Trek, Raleigh, Schwinn, Yokota

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Totally agree with the bit about Boomers coming back to bikes in a big way, motorcycles and a lot of other hobbies. This phenomena also drives prices UP. You don't wanna get into a $$ pissing match with a well-heeled boomer.

And I also agree with the bike theft thing.....cops didn't care and other than taking down your serial...did nothing. I'd even say it was pandemic around the US. In the 90's my kids were into BMX bikes and if they even laid one down and went to get a drink, it was gone upon their return. I did manage to get their bikes back because they stuck out like a sore thumb...but nothing to do with the cops. One boy thief had a mountain of bikes behind the trailer where he lived...mom worked for the State Hwy Patrol....nice one, mom.

Kevin
Real1shepherd is offline  
Old 10-24-16, 10:20 AM
  #231  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 167

Bikes: Trek, Raleigh, Schwinn, Yokota

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by AlexCyclistRoch
FWIW, you would more often see women of my parent's generation riding 'town cruiser' bikes of the period than you would see men riding bikes. My mother occasionally used my sister's Schwinn cruiser.
Even in this small area if a middle aged man is riding a bike in town, it's probably because of his circumstances, i.e., DUI, chronic drug use etc. Except in places where bike riders frequent at like a recreation spot...we have a reservoir that is really popular for that.

Now out on our endless, two-lane farm roads, you see bike teams and older riders a lot. I tried that but you're forcing the drivers to yield(no usable shoulder) and they're not in the least empathetic. Those roads are a dream for bikers, but the inherent risk is high.

Kevin

Last edited by Real1shepherd; 11-06-16 at 03:13 PM.
Real1shepherd is offline  
Old 10-27-16, 08:12 AM
  #232  
Senior Member
 
Richard Cranium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Rural Missouri - mostly central and southeastern
Posts: 3,013

Bikes: 2003 LeMond -various other junk bikes

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 78 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 44 Times in 35 Posts
Bike boom ? Maybe some of you remember the Arab oil embargo - 1973..... Sort of got a few people thinking differently........
Oh - the humanity !!!!
Richard Cranium is offline  
Old 10-27-16, 07:22 PM
  #233  
RidesOldTrek
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Minneapolis MN
Posts: 165

Bikes: 2018 Velo Orange Campeur, 1976 Trek TX-500, 1990 Bridgestone MB-3, 1983 Trek 500

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by Real1shepherd
It would be absolutely unthinkable for a kid to leave home at 9AM today and reappear right before dinner. Honestly back then, our parents relished the 'break'.

Kevin
Glad you enjoyed the stories Kevin!

OK, slightly off-topic...
We lived in a brand new neighborhood development on the edge of a small town with hordes of kids my age. My mom used to tell me I would run off with a pack of kids (I was probably no older than 5). She said she would go outside and yell "Paul, come home!" when she felt I was gone too long. I guess she was training me for the all-day disappearances in my future. My mom was a Chicago city kid, and from all the stories I heard was pretty adventurous.
ridesoldtrek is offline  
Old 10-27-16, 07:48 PM
  #234  
Senior Member
 
Loose Chain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 2,067

Bikes: 84 Pinarello Trevisio, 86 Guerciotti SLX, 96 Specialized Stumpjumper, 2010 Surly Cross Check, 88 Centurion Prestige, 73 Raleigh Sports, GT Force, Bridgestone MB4

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 278 Post(s)
Liked 71 Times in 56 Posts
Originally Posted by Richard Cranium
Bike boom ? Maybe some of you remember the Arab oil embargo - 1973..... Sort of got a few people thinking differently........
Oh - the humanity !!!!
We would leave and be gone all day. The 60s and early 70s. Tons of kids and we all had bikes. My mother would come out and yell and the next mother would come out and yell in relay until one of us heard one of our mothers. There was also a bell that would be rung. Often we were miles away and old man Henderson would come chugging down the road in his ancient car and raise a fuss because we were on his property and did we not hear our moms calling us? Apparently he had good hearing. Secretly he liked us all camped around his farm, gave him some sport chasing us but he never tired too hard to actually catch us. We were after all feral small humans.


Regarding rural roads and bicyclists, where I live is rural, lot's of cyclist, mostly men, some women, a regular bike team also. Most drivers are courteous. Never had a problem here except for dangerous dogs.
Loose Chain is offline  
Old 10-27-16, 10:28 PM
  #235  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 167

Bikes: Trek, Raleigh, Schwinn, Yokota

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by ridesoldtrek
Glad you enjoyed the stories Kevin!

OK, slightly off-topic...
We lived in a brand new neighborhood development on the edge of a small town with hordes of kids my age. My mom used to tell me I would run off with a pack of kids (I was probably no older than 5). She said she would go outside and yell "Paul, come home!" when she felt I was gone too long. I guess she was training me for the all-day disappearances in my future. My mom was a Chicago city kid, and from all the stories I heard was pretty adventurous.
Nice story background...makes me feel warn & fuzzy even though my neighborhood experience was very different, unfortunately.

Kevin
Real1shepherd is offline  
Old 10-27-16, 10:45 PM
  #236  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 167

Bikes: Trek, Raleigh, Schwinn, Yokota

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Loose Chain
We would leave and be gone all day. The 60s and early 70s. Tons of kids and we all had bikes. My mother would come out and yell and the next mother would come out and yell in relay until one of us heard one of our mothers. There was also a bell that would be rung. Often we were miles away and old man Henderson would come chugging down the road in his ancient car and raise a fuss because we were on his property and did we not hear our moms calling us? Apparently he had good hearing. Secretly he liked us all camped around his farm, gave him some sport chasing us but he never tired too hard to actually catch us. We were after all feral small humans.


Regarding rural roads and bicyclists, where I live is rural, lot's of cyclist, mostly men, some women, a regular bike team also. Most drivers are courteous. Never had a problem here except for dangerous dogs.
Thanks for that....makes me laugh. Weren't any kids in my neighborhood because they were grown up and in college like my older brothers. But I can sure relate to the local farmers chasing me around a block or two...lol. They had to know it was always that auburn haired kid again, causing trouble. I wasn't a thief, but I sure found intricate ways to get into Dutch. A couple of times my parents were so stunned by what they heard, that they just skipped any sort of punishment. Well, I didn't choose to live in a neighborhood with no kids.

I don't think a bell would have worked for me...maybe one of those air-blast things they used to start boat races.

Biking on the two-laners here is a serious problem, as I stated earlier. All the land around our town is farmed. The farmers are usually in a hurry to get into town and buy parts or whatever. Bad Mojo to make them yield to bicyclists...they will gladly tell you the roads were built originally for them and their farming enterprises. A fair number of cyclists are killed and maimed around here every yr. I was nearly a statistic a few times. You do have a better chance in a group though. Unfortunately, having Aspergers does not make me much of a team player.

Kevin
Real1shepherd is offline  
Old 10-28-16, 09:38 AM
  #237  
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 32

Bikes: Mercian Audax Velo Orange Rando. Cannondale R800

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Worked at two bike shops and sold a ton of bikes, usually 25-30 on a saturday. never saw most of them on the road though. We didn't think anything of riding 50-70 miles down 4 lane highway. I like it much better now with the trails we have.
1100 Springs is offline  
Old 10-28-16, 09:59 AM
  #238  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 167

Bikes: Trek, Raleigh, Schwinn, Yokota

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by 1100 Springs
Worked at two bike shops and sold a ton of bikes, usually 25-30 on a saturday. never saw most of them on the road though. We didn't think anything of riding 50-70 miles down 4 lane highway. I like it much better now with the trails we have.
Wow...that's a lot of bikes sold in a day! What were the majority sold;fixie, 10 spd, 3spd, dirt bikes? And where did this take place? What proportion were boys, girls, young adults in college, men, women?

Kevin
Real1shepherd is offline  
Old 10-28-16, 10:21 AM
  #239  
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 32

Bikes: Mercian Audax Velo Orange Rando. Cannondale R800

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Real1shepherd
Wow...that's a lot of bikes sold in a day! What were the majority sold;fixie, 10 spd, 3spd, dirt bikes? And where did this take place? What proportion were boys, girls, young adults in college, men, women?

Kevin

This was in Houston , one shop we sold a lot of bmx and 10 speeds, to kids and their parents, the other we sold anything we could get.
1100 Springs is offline  
Old 10-28-16, 05:54 PM
  #240  
Senior Member
 
Loose Chain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 2,067

Bikes: 84 Pinarello Trevisio, 86 Guerciotti SLX, 96 Specialized Stumpjumper, 2010 Surly Cross Check, 88 Centurion Prestige, 73 Raleigh Sports, GT Force, Bridgestone MB4

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 278 Post(s)
Liked 71 Times in 56 Posts
Originally Posted by Real1shepherd
Wow...that's a lot of bikes sold in a day! What were the majority sold;fixie, 10 spd, 3spd, dirt bikes? And where did this take place? What proportion were boys, girls, young adults in college, men, women?

Kevin
In the 70s people were buying "Ten Speeds" by the dozens, everybody had one. I had a motorcycle and a car and I rode a ten speed because that was cool. The BMX craze buyers were not yet born and a "fixie!" Single speed was for paper boys. The cool kids had gears and because us Boomers who were the ones buying them had not had our IQs significantly dulled by ingestion of secondary hormones we were smart enough to understand why brakes might be something one might want importantly.

Last edited by Loose Chain; 10-28-16 at 05:58 PM.
Loose Chain is offline  
Old 10-29-16, 08:46 PM
  #241  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 515
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 213 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by Lakerat
I was a bike boomer who wasn't aware of the boom. Loved biking as a kid on heavyweights and sting rays. Didn't have much money in college, but was surprised by a gift from my mom that was enough to buy a new Centurion Super LeMans in 1975. It was just under $200 tax and all with an upgraded Cyclone rear derail. I still have that bike and am doing a mild restore following my son making a fixed gear out of it.


After getting the Centurion, I got toe clips and straps immediately and started riding with cycling shoes and cleats soon after. My college, University of Missouri-Columbia, had an annual campus team relay cycling race. My team was of independents competing against fraternity teams. My team raced 4 times and got two 1sts, and two 2nds. I also raced in one road race in the amateur category and got 5th.


The first 10 speeds I saw resulted in awe. Before that I was in awe of "English Racers" My brother had one that I got to ride some. I'd say I back burnered bikes for cars and girls from the age of 16 to 21 when I got the Centurion.


I didn't know there was a fad going on. Most of the people who were riding were riding to classes and some professors. Mainly to beat the parking problems.

A bonus connection resulted from this post. I was contacted by another winner of the campus bike race I did in the 1970's in Columbia, MO. He first thought I was on his team, but he won the race a year or two before me. He was probably hoping he'd found one of his team mates, but nice to meet someone who thoroughly understands an common experience.
Lakerat is offline  
Old 10-29-16, 10:21 PM
  #242  
Senior Member
 
Doc_Wui's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Chicago Suburbs
Posts: 1,400

Bikes: GT Transeo & a half dozen ebike conversions.

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 340 Post(s)
Liked 275 Times in 192 Posts
In 1973, I bought a Sears 10 speed to go riding with my new girl friend. It was something like $89, and not much money for me. I was probably earning $13K at the time, a good salary for a young engineer.

We got married, and in 1975, I went to a bike shop and got me a yellow Gitane and her a red Raleigh, both 18 speeds with the taped handlebars, and friction shifters. Probably $450-500 for the pair. Not cheap, but obtainable. Around that time, I lusted for a Datsun 260Z, maybe a Cannondale, and a Nikon F, but we bought a house instead. In thise days, I could have ridden my bike to work, as it was only six miles on city/suburban streets. I did ride a few times, but thought it took too long and I got too sweaty.

My wife and I enjoyed our bikes. We went riding together and packed up the bikes for rides with friends. I mounted a child seat on mine, and used it thru the early 1990's.

Those two bikes went up on rafters around 1999, and stayed there til I needed room around 2006. I wish I had not done it, but I put them out with the trash and a scrapper took them away.
Doc_Wui is offline  
Old 10-30-16, 07:49 AM
  #243  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 3,711
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 118 Post(s)
Liked 92 Times in 62 Posts
I'm not sure that the phrase, "bike boom", is even appropriate. 1973 may have been the peak year for adult bike sales, but I see many more people riding now than I did then.
PaulH is offline  
Old 10-30-16, 04:36 PM
  #244  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 167

Bikes: Trek, Raleigh, Schwinn, Yokota

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Loose Chain
In the 70s people were buying "Ten Speeds" by the dozens, everybody had one. I had a motorcycle and a car and I rode a ten speed because that was cool. The BMX craze buyers were not yet born and a "fixie!" Single speed was for paper boys. The cool kids had gears and because us Boomers who were the ones buying them had not had our IQs significantly dulled by ingestion of secondary hormones we were smart enough to understand why brakes might be something one might want importantly.
I would totally agree with that statement. 10spds were so cool that people bought them, used them a few times and then shuffled them around their garages for many more yrs to come. I've certainly found a few that way.

They actually reined supreme until 21spd mountain and hybrid bikes came out and then again, everyone had to have one....then shuffled them around in the garages thing again...lol. Yeah and nothing like a good set of brakes front & back fer sure!

Kevin
Real1shepherd is offline  
Old 10-30-16, 04:42 PM
  #245  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 167

Bikes: Trek, Raleigh, Schwinn, Yokota

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by PaulH
I'm not sure that the phrase, "bike boom", is even appropriate. 1973 may have been the peak year for adult bike sales, but I see many more people riding now than I did then.
Well, it was quite clear on college campuses that there was a bike boom going on in the 70's...as witnessed by the amount of bikes on your average sized campus and the requisite number of bike shops to support that supply. We're still buying and finding those bikes that have been lingering in garages, almost forgotten about all this time.

Kevin
Real1shepherd is offline  
Old 10-30-16, 04:46 PM
  #246  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 167

Bikes: Trek, Raleigh, Schwinn, Yokota

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Doc_Wui
In 1973, I bought a Sears 10 speed to go riding with my new girl friend. It was something like $89, and not much money for me. I was probably earning $13K at the time, a good salary for a young engineer.

We got married, and in 1975, I went to a bike shop and got me a yellow Gitane and her a red Raleigh, both 18 speeds with the taped handlebars, and friction shifters. Probably $450-500 for the pair. Not cheap, but obtainable. Around that time, I lusted for a Datsun 260Z, maybe a Cannondale, and a Nikon F, but we bought a house instead. In thise days, I could have ridden my bike to work, as it was only six miles on city/suburban streets. I did ride a few times, but thought it took too long and I got too sweaty.

My wife and I enjoyed our bikes. We went riding together and packed up the bikes for rides with friends. I mounted a child seat on mine, and used it thru the early 1990's.

Those two bikes went up on rafters around 1999, and stayed there til I needed room around 2006. I wish I had not done it, but I put them out with the trash and a scrapper took them away.

Yeah, that unfortunately is the downside to decent 70's bikes...MANY went to the landfill. Depending on the area you live, there might not have been a market for your old multi-spd bike. I've seen them given away for lack of a sale.....although the best quality ones were usually recognized and saved....but not all.

I was thrust back into bikes for my boys. My youngest son still has the bug. Rides a folding multi-spd bike to work from Brooklyn to Manhattan. They pay almost $4,000/month to live in an upscale shoe box...hence the folding bike for lack of room. I almost have him talked into a road bike, but he's concerned about having it stolen. He folds his bike and actually packs it inside where he works. Tough logic to defeat. I have a Raleigh SuperCourse I'd like to restore for him, but I don't want it going straight to thieves either.

Kevin

Last edited by Real1shepherd; 10-30-16 at 04:55 PM.
Real1shepherd is offline  
Old 10-30-16, 06:00 PM
  #247  
If I own it, I ride it
 
CV-6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Cardinal Country
Posts: 5,579

Bikes: Lejeune(14), Raleigh, Raysport, Jan De Reus, Gazelle, Masi, B. Carré(4), Springfield, Greg Lemond, Andre Bertin, Schwinn Paramount

Mentioned: 55 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 591 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 662 Times in 311 Posts
Originally Posted by Lakerat
A bonus connection resulted from this post. I was contacted by another winner of the campus bike race I did in the 1970's in Columbia, MO. He first thought I was on his team, but he won the race a year or two before me. He was probably hoping he'd found one of his team mates, but nice to meet someone who thoroughly understands an common experience.
Guilty as charged. It is fun sharing a common experience even if it was a few years apart. And you are right, I thought I had come across one of my team mates.
__________________
Please do not "like" my posts. This isn't Facebook.

Lynn Travers

Photos

CV-6 is offline  
Old 10-30-16, 07:23 PM
  #248  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 515
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 213 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by CV-6
Guilty as charged. It is fun sharing a common experience even if it was a few years apart. And you are right, I thought I had come across one of my team mates.

Lynn, As a result of you contact, and getting out the programs, I found one of my team mates. A chemistry prof at Vanderbilt and involved in cancer research. Haven't had a chance to ask him if he still rides bikes.
Lakerat is offline  
Old 10-31-16, 10:46 PM
  #249  
Senior Member
 
FlatSix911's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Los Altos, CA
Posts: 1,775
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 6 Posts
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
bmx.jpg (93.1 KB, 34 views)
FlatSix911 is offline  
Old 11-01-16, 11:17 AM
  #250  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 167

Bikes: Trek, Raleigh, Schwinn, Yokota

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Here! Here!

And finding stooges..uh, I mean friends, that would take risks for you.

Recent research has proven that kids hooked on the video screen(not a correlation to the kinds of games they play-Mindcraft just as addictive as Grand Theft Auto) have the same physiology and endorphin release as heroine addicts. And that it takes four-six weeks to 'dry them out'.

I don't think that's the same as playing outside, challenging yourself, and/or being an Adrenalin junkie on a bike.

Kevin
Real1shepherd is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Zinger
Professional Cycling For the Fans
12
07-10-14 08:06 AM
hyhuu
Road Cycling
124
07-08-13 05:02 AM
Zinger
Professional Cycling For the Fans
28
04-26-13 05:24 PM
a_morrow
Classic & Vintage
88
05-27-12 08:03 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.