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Old 10-19-12, 11:57 AM
  #26  
gerv 
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Originally Posted by sesmith View Post
Sympathy post
I think I can say you don't quite bounce back at 54 like you did at 24.
I wouldn't assume this. You'd be suffering plenty if you were 24 or 54. I'm older than you and have suffered two accidents in the last 18 months. Those 11 weeks will pass quickly and then's a good time to think about riding. Whatever you do... don't pack it in. You're too young.
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Old 10-19-12, 02:27 PM
  #27  
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Bloody Hell! That's a terrifying smash. I wish you a quick and pleasant recovery
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Old 10-19-12, 02:55 PM
  #28  
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I hope your recovery continues uneventfully.

I was reminded of the perils of downhill riding recently. In this case, it was with a group ride... a pub crawl a few weeks ago. We had gone down this particular steep hill before, but this was a bigger group than usual, and unknown to most of us, someone joined the ride at the first bar stop, and he was already drunk when we got there.

He was riding a cheap mountain bike with a loose rear suspension. It started to shimmy and he held on for dear life for several seconds before losing control and flopping on his face. I thought it was likely he was dead but he came to. It was the first time the pub crawl group called an ambulance, and they got there in about 3 minutes.

He had a concussion and a broken collar bone, but he refused treatment and transport to the hospital; instead he insisted on calling his mom (a nurse) who came and got him.

I saw the whole thing. For some reason, the size of the group made me uneasy and I was taking it very easy down the hill. In fact, the guy passed me just before wiping out and he looked too wild even before the shimmy started, so I backed off quite a bit and gave him some room.

If you don't feel like you're in full control, it's probably time to back off a bit.
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Old 10-19-12, 03:28 PM
  #29  
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Glad you weren't hurt any worse than you were, and will join in wishing you a speedy and complete recovery.
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Old 10-19-12, 03:36 PM
  #30  
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Yeah, that's one advantage of being on a fixie: you just can't descend that fast. My comfortable limit is about 56 kmh (35 mph), but I usually don't go above 48 kmh (30 mph). A lot of scrubbng speed with the brakes, so the pads wear out quicker, especially in the winter when it's raining. And then, when it's snowing, I'm sometimes sliding down the hill with the rear wheel locked up at about 10 kmh.

So I can imagine hitting a deep pothole at speed with the front brake on, ouch. I won't say anything about the helmet, except that you should now throw it away, or make sure you never use that one again, as it has given you your money's worth!

Luis
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Old 10-19-12, 05:11 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by sesmith View Post
... Part of the problem is that the older you get, you have a slowdown of reaction time. Maybe it's imperceptable, but it's there ...
Well, that's probably true. But the REAL problem is that we aren't indestuctible like we were in our 20's...
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Old 10-19-12, 05:31 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by overthehillmedi View Post
Glad to hear youre doing well and will be back riding but that brings up the question , How's the bike?

Let's just say it needs some parts. It's my titanium ride. I haven't felt like tearing it apart yet, but it looks like the frame may be unscathed. I think I protected it with my leg. We had to pick up my leg and remove the bike at the time (though I was unclipped). It will need a set of wheels, but I had them about worn out anyway. Handlebar is bent, sti lever a little damaged but still usable. Not sure if I trust the carbon fiber fork anymore, though it looks undamaged. I have 2 other bikes to ride, so I probably won't mess with it until spring.
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Old 10-19-12, 06:04 PM
  #33  
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Glad to hear you lived to tell the tale. Speedy recovery.

Now about that pothole, it may have been a new one. That could explain why you didn't expect it and why, as you say, you'd never hit it before but should have.

What scares me about any fast downhill is that you can see only so far. I've seen people bomb down hills covered by patches of pine needles or other autumnal debris. That stuff gives me the willies. I may be able to dodge any one or two or three such patches, but a non-negotiable combination is always possible. On one straight road we ride regularly on the tandem there is a bump of some sort, probably a sunken gas line access plate. What with the shadows and all, I never see it even though I am primed to look. I manage to hit it about 50% of the time. Fortunately it is a flat road section, not downhill.

Be careful out there, folks.
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Old 10-19-12, 06:08 PM
  #34  
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I wish you a fast recovery.
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Old 10-19-12, 06:09 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by jimmuller View Post
What scares me about any fast downhill is that you can see only so far. I've seen people bomb down hills covered by patches of pine needles or other autumnal debris. That stuff gives me the willies. I may be able to dodge any one or two or three such patches, but a non-negotiable combination is always possible. On one straight road we ride regularly on the tandem there is a bump of some sort, probably a sunken gas line access plate. What with the shadows and all, I never see it even though I am primed to look. I manage to hit it about 50% of the time. Fortunately it is a flat road section, not downhill.
The most difficult condition for riding fast downhill is when the sun is shining strongly and is relatively low, so it casts harsh shadows from roadside trees. The strong light keeps my pupils small, so that when it comes to discerning anything about the road surface in the shadows... well, it's almost impossible.

Riding a tandem also is a good lesson is risk management. When riding ours, I am fully aware I have someone else's life and well-being in my hands, and that removes any thought of heroics on downhills. The shouts of protest from behind me also play a part too...
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Old 10-20-12, 08:36 AM
  #36  
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I come to this thread late, but my condolences for your pain and forced immobility- fall riding is the best, but also pretty dangerous. The wet leaves, the low light, etc.
I've retired from fast descents. While exhilarating, I've rationalized that the thrill just isn't worth the risk. I ride for the climbs now!
I hope the healing goes smoothly and the bike frame is OK.
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Old 10-20-12, 09:49 AM
  #37  
Wogster
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Originally Posted by gerv View Post
I wouldn't assume this. You'd be suffering plenty if you were 24 or 54. I'm older than you and have suffered two accidents in the last 18 months. Those 11 weeks will pass quickly and then's a good time to think about riding. Whatever you do... don't pack it in. You're too young.
I came to a conclusion a while ago, when your less then 20, you bounce, between 20 and 40 you bounce back, after 40, you just break.
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Old 10-20-12, 02:56 PM
  #38  
GeorgeBMac
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Originally Posted by Wogster View Post
I came to a conclusion a while ago, when your less then 20, you bounce, between 20 and 40 you bounce back, after 40, you just break.
Or maybe... before 40 your just too stupid to know that you're broken? Instead you're more concerned with beating your buddy or impressing that girl..


With age comes wisdom. Right?
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Old 10-20-12, 09:09 PM
  #39  
JoeMan
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Good fortune in your recovery.
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