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Falling Off

Old 11-30-12, 04:08 PM
  #26  
ChrisM2097
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I'm not yet in the 50+ club, but I haven't fallen while riding in over 20 years (when I was a teenager - rode into a deep pot-hole). Granted, I didn't do a whole lot of riding for most of those 20 years. I averaged about 1,800 miles a year for the past couple years. 12 months ago I went clipless. I've had a few close calls, but haven't hit the ground yet.

Maybe I'm just more careful and attentive, and not prone to risk-taking?
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Old 11-30-12, 04:56 PM
  #27  
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Not saying.......don't want to jinx myself.
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Old 11-30-12, 04:59 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by Timtruro View Post
Not saying.......don't want to jinx myself.
Hate to tell you but just posting in the thread is enough to alert whatever it is. At least that's how it works with flats, and it just stands to reason that falling-off fairies are more vicious that flat fairies ... so we're all already marked ...
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Old 11-30-12, 08:43 PM
  #29  
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3 times in the last year.

First, got chased by two loose Jack Russells. Cut in front of my bike, braked hard. I was riding my winter bike with clips and straps, and still couldn't get my right foot out fast enough. Got into a huge argument with their owner about leash laws and why they should apply to him, too.

Second, wandered off a paved path connecting a road with a MUP. Trying to edge back on, caught a raised edge of cement flush against the sidewall, and went over like Arte Johnson in the old Laugh-In clip (you guys should all be old enough to remember it). Landed flush on the helmet, cracked it.

Third, the classic "unclip right, lean too far left" at a red light. Horrified the knock-out MILF in the SUV next to me. "Are you OK???" I should have milked that for all it was worth. But I was laughing too loud to pretend that I was hurt.

Going on 6 moths continuously upright now. Knock on wood.
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Old 12-01-12, 10:04 AM
  #30  
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Whats the advantage of tying your foot into a pedal when it would be needed in case of a fall?
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Old 12-01-12, 01:30 PM
  #31  
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Falling off can be serious. Three weeks ago I fell while riding to school (J Street Sacramento) and broke my hip. It hurt. I hope to be back on the bike, but it will be several months. Anyone else have experience with a broken hip?
M Riley
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Old 12-01-12, 04:19 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by mriley View Post
Falling off can be serious. Three weeks ago I fell while riding to school (J Street Sacramento) and broke my hip. It hurt. I hope to be back on the bike, but it will be several months. Anyone else have experience with a broken hip?
M Riley
Not me but my grandpa did when in his early 80s. He had been walking 7 mi /day at the time. It took him about 4 or 5 months to get back up to 7 mi daily.

Good luck with your healing.
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Old 12-01-12, 05:05 PM
  #33  
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I don't usually fall off my bike unless I forget to unclip when I stop. My falling seems to be reserved for climbing the stairs to my bedroom. Hope this does not jinx my record.
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Old 12-01-12, 07:01 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by apollored View Post
Whats the advantage of tying your foot into a pedal when it would be needed in case of a fall?
You need to take up golf. Or raising Jack Russells.
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Old 12-02-12, 09:02 AM
  #35  
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Once last year when a clip failed to disengage. Guess I'm due again .
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Old 12-02-12, 11:20 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by apollored View Post
Whats the advantage of tying your foot into a pedal when it would be needed in case of a fall?
The answer lies in what differentiates bicycle riders from cyclists.



:running for cover smiley:
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Old 12-02-12, 04:19 PM
  #37  
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That doesnt answer my question though!


And no i dont want to raise jack Russels but I dont want to tie my feet into pedals either...

And no am not a pro racing cyclist and not ashamed of it either, be a bike rider fine by me.
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Old 12-02-12, 04:27 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by apollored View Post
Whats the advantage of tying your foot into a pedal when it would be needed in case of a fall?
The advantage is that you don't have to worry about your foot slipping off the pedal. The disadvantage is that you have to learn to rotate your ankle to disengage the clip.

The great part of this is that we can make our own choice what we want to use.
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Old 12-02-12, 04:35 PM
  #39  
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While riding mountain bikes (2 or 3 rides/week with a total of over 30+ miles/week all on technical single track) I pretty much fall every ride. Some are spectacular over the handlebars and some are just washed out rear tire sliding falls. If I am not falling on a regular basis I don't feel like I am trying hard enough to have fun. I've had four serious falls this year on the mountain bike that caused me to miss a least one day of riding and one did cause me to attend the local ER.

Street riding - 100 or so miles a week I had not fallen for years until yesterday afternoon.

Saturday Afternoon:

I was riding slowly along the sidewalk at Mission Beach Park near and headed for a concrete picnic table about 50 yards away where I was going to stop for lunch.

Suddenly, with no warning, a big kite descended from the sky and landed on my handlebars. It was a 36 or 40 inch kite and was much wider than me or the bike. The kite flyer gave the control lines a big tug to try and get it back in the air. The kite flyer was behind me and off to my left. I was like a fish when the angler sets the hook - the kite jerked me off the bike and slammed me to the pavement. I landed on my right elbow and hip and the kite control lines wrapped around my chain wheel, rear sprocket, seat post, and chain. I was wrapped up in the kite and pissed. Took a while to get untangled and upright.

Harsh words were exchanged as the kite flyer told me it was my fault for riding on the sidewalk. I thought he was ignoring the fact that the sidewalk is the Mission Bay bike path that runs from the bay to La Jolla.
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Old 12-02-12, 04:36 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by jmccain View Post
The advantage is that you don't have to worry about your foot slipping off the pedal. The disadvantage is that you have to learn to rotate your ankle to disengage the clip.

The great part of this is that we can make our own choice what we want to use.
For me the disadvantage is that when a kid or dog or deer or squirrel run out in front of me, I don't have to worry about not having time to disengage and falling. On a busy trail that happens all too frequently.

My first rule is:
-- Don't run into anything
-- Don't let anything run into me
-- Don't fall

After that: have a good ride

Anything that ties my foot to the bike and can cause me to fall is inconsistent with those rules.

I think if I did road riding or any kind of performance riding I would feel differently.
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Old 12-02-12, 08:30 PM
  #41  
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If you're cornering at a decent speed, and your rear wheel loses traction and breaks loose, if you think you can stop yourself from going down by sticking your foot out, I'd suggest finding a good orthopedist before you need one.

There's a difference between a crash, and a fall. Most times that foot retention systems (be they clip-in pedals or clips and straps) cause a rider to go down, it's a fall. Usually from 0-3 mph, as you're stopping and have a brain fart.
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Old 12-03-12, 07:25 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by mprelaw View Post
If you're cornering at a decent speed, and your rear wheel loses traction and breaks loose, if you think you can stop yourself from going down by sticking your foot out, I'd suggest finding a good orthopedist before you need.
I had one of those earlier in the year. Two torn knee ligaments, three months off the bike and a lot of rehab work
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Old 12-03-12, 07:36 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by jmccain View Post
The advantage is that you don't have to worry about your foot slipping off the pedal. The disadvantage is that you have to learn to rotate your ankle to disengage the clip.

The great part of this is that we can make our own choice what we want to use.
Ouch I think with the current state of my feet that might be painful if done too often.
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Old 12-03-12, 07:59 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by ChrisM2097 View Post
Maybe I'm just more careful and attentive, and not prone to risk-taking?

^ this. When I was a bit younger, I rode MTBs looking for technical single track, jumps, bumps and descents. Falling down was just a part of riding. But after my back surgery, I listened to the doctor and toned down my off-road riding.

I do fall when I ride off road now, but it's usually not potentially as catastrophic as before.


I still have a chainring shaped scar on my inner thigh. How did I even get that?
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Old 12-03-12, 09:14 AM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by mprelaw View Post
... There's a difference between a crash, and a fall. Most times that foot retention systems (be they clip-in pedals or clips and straps) cause a rider to go down, it's a fall. Usually from 0-3 mph, as you're stopping and have a brain fart.
Yes, there is a difference... But I prefer to avoid BOTH of them.

But, the failing to unclip problem can just as easily be caused by a sudden, unexpected event where you simply don't have time to unclip as it does a "brain fart". Out on a back country road those unexpected events happen seldom. On a trail crowded with walkers, joggers, strollers, children, skate boarders, inline skaters, other bicyclists, dogs, squirrels and such -- all going different directions -- you need to expect the unexpected.

I think it is less a matter of personal choice than it is a question of what best fits the needs of the rider as well as the environment he/she is riding in.

Neither clipless nor platform pedals are inherently better for all riders and all circumstances. Just as a pickup truck is not inherently better than a sports car.
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Old 12-03-12, 09:28 AM
  #46  
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Crashes are somewhat unavoidable. Potential falls can sometimes be "recovered" by steering, adding power, and choosing to stay upright.

I think that's where clipless pedals are an advantage in MTB riding, that you can continue to pedal when you're no longer directly upright and are fighting to maintain power. On traverses, through streambeds where there are oddly spaced larger rocks, and climbing on uneven trails. Clipless riding shines here - especially if conditions are wet. There'd be no way to keep on the pedals otherwise.

Toe clips for MTB singletrack are a no-no from my experience. They require too much fiddling.
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Old 12-03-12, 09:38 AM
  #47  
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Most of my road bike spills have been at the hands of others. MTB, well... I prefer to call them unplanned dismounts.
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Old 12-03-12, 10:02 AM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by GeorgeBMac View Post
Just as a pickup truck is not inherently better than a sports car.
I see you are not a "good old boy!"
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Old 12-03-12, 10:16 AM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by GeorgeBMac View Post
Yes, there is a difference... But I prefer to avoid BOTH of them.

But, the failing to unclip problem can just as easily be caused by a sudden, unexpected event where you simply don't have time to unclip as it does a "brain fart". Out on a back country road those unexpected events happen seldom. On a trail crowded with walkers, joggers, strollers, children, skate boarders, inline skaters, other bicyclists, dogs, squirrels and such -- all going different directions -- you need to expect the unexpected.

I think it is less a matter of personal choice than it is a question of what best fits the needs of the rider as well as the environment he/she is riding in.
A lot of riding skill involved here also. I am able to ride as slow as 1.5 mph and still stay clipped in if the situation warrants. OTOH, I am the first person to unclip at least one foot if my reading of the situation indicates any potential danger - ANY small kids, dogs - loose or not - family riding in a bicycle "parade," folks walking with ear plugs (if I can tell) who don't indicate by their change of pace or location on the trail that they hear my bell or my shouting, sand on the trail, etc.

Last edited by DnvrFox; 12-03-12 at 10:21 AM.
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Old 12-03-12, 11:08 AM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by DnvrFox View Post
I see you are not a "good old boy!"

Ooops! I've been "outed"!

(And I definitely agree with your second post that falls/crashes and "unplanned dismounts" (I LIKE that one!) can often be avoided with some pre-planning and caution. (Back when safe driving was in fashion I think they called that: "Defensive Driving").
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