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GPS Which one would you recommend with heart monitor

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GPS Which one would you recommend with heart monitor

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Old 03-16-13, 10:55 AM
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apesrunner58
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GPS Which one would you recommend with heart monitor

I have a Garmin watch but I would like a GPS that does more than my watch does.
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Old 03-16-13, 10:58 AM
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Either the Edge 705, which is now a discontinued model, or the 800 or 810. The 810 was just released in the last month or so, so it's going to be quite expensive whereas a 705 can be found relatively inexpensively on eBay.
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Old 03-16-13, 11:04 AM
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Looked at two -The Garmin 500 and the 800. Both are capable of Heart and cadence meters and it depends on what you want from the Meter. Not requiring anything too complicated-I went for the 500. Less complicated and does a lot less than the 800 but is also cheaper.

Both these models have now been replaced but if you decide that you want one of these soon-There are a few online distributors offering discounts at present on the old models.
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Old 03-16-13, 01:23 PM
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If you can find a non-functional 705 or 500, you can send it in to Garmin for repair and they'll replace it with a refurbed unit (new case and battery) for $110. Turn around time is about a week.

To date, the 510 and 810 are rife with problems and full of features in which I have no interest. Check the following forums for more info:

https://forums.garmin.com/forumdisplay.php?20-Cycling
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Old 03-16-13, 04:42 PM
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If you use your gps for more than just biking, check Garmin Dakota 20. It's ANT capable with heart rate and cadence units. Surprisingly the Dakota is very bike friendly at a fraction of the price of bike specific units.
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Old 03-16-13, 05:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Roosterbird View Post
If you use your gps for more than just biking, check Garmin Dakota 20. It's ANT capable with heart rate and cadence units. Surprisingly the Dakota is very bike friendly at a fraction of the price of bike specific units.
If you have an IPhone 4S or 5 then Strava works well on it and it's free. I very much like that program. I have found that it tracks and maps pretty accurately and keeps pretty good (and motivating) statistics and graphs on things like: distance, climbing, total time and cycling time.

For instance, right now I can see that I have ridden each of the past 5 days and, for this year, have ridden 42 times for 661 miles in 64 hours and climbed 24,623 feet. And, it graphs all of that out by week or by month so I can track my progress...

It also works with Low Energy Bluetooth enabled heart monitors such as the Polar H7.

I haven't tried the heart rate monitoring yet -- but it's on my to-do list to get one.
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Old 03-16-13, 05:15 PM
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Yes, and to the OP, I have a 705 with a cracked screen (shut my hatchback on it). It otherwise works fine (I've used it and it records and reports accurately on Garmin Connect). Its yours if you want it for the price of shipping. You will have to send it to Garmin and give them $110 but you get back a perfect unit.
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Old 03-16-13, 07:48 PM
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I love my Garmin 800, which are now more reasonably priced on eBay with the upgraded 810 now available.

I had a 705 and didn't like it as well. Have used the 800 for three plus years and only issue is I had to replace the heart monitor strap.
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Old 03-17-13, 05:56 AM
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Originally Posted by GeorgeBMac View Post
If you have an IPhone 4S or 5 then Strava works well on it and it's free. I very much like that program. I have found that it tracks and maps pretty accurately and keeps pretty good (and motivating) statistics and graphs on things like: distance, climbing, total time and cycling time.

For instance, right now I can see that I have ridden each of the past 5 days and, for this year, have ridden 42 times for 661 miles in 64 hours and climbed 24,623 feet. And, it graphs all of that out by week or by month so I can track my progress...

It also works with Low Energy Bluetooth enabled heart monitors such as the Polar H7.

I haven't tried the heart rate monitoring yet -- but it's on my to-do list to get one.
I use my iPhone as well, but I use Cyclemeter instead of Strava. Cyclemeter has a main screen (where you start, pause and stop a ride) they call a Stopwatch screen where you can flip through 5 screens of ride data, all of which has your route map and location displayed. Strava's main screen only shows speed, elapsed time and distance on it's main screen and to see the rest, you have to wait until you end the ride. But if you're a competitor, Strava has the advantage over Cyclemeter because it rates you against other riders. Although you can do the same thing with Cyclemeter, Strava does a much better job. Also, Cyclemeter is $5.00 and Strava has a limited version that is free. I can't remember what their paid version sells for. And Strava has a version for iOS and Droid, whereas Cyclemeter is limited to the iPhone. Like everything, it boils down to personal preference.

OP, if you are using a heart rate monitor strap with your Forerunner, you can still use that and not have to purchase another HRM if you go with a phone app. You also won't have to purchase another HRM strap if you go with any of the Garmin units.
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Old 03-17-13, 10:40 AM
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Edge 500.
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Old 03-17-13, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by John_V View Post
I use my iPhone as well, but I use Cyclemeter instead of Strava. Cyclemeter has a main screen (where you start, pause and stop a ride) they call a Stopwatch screen where you can flip through 5 screens of ride data, all of which has your route map and location displayed. Strava's main screen only shows speed, elapsed time and distance on it's main screen and to see the rest, you have to wait until you end the ride. But if you're a competitor, Strava has the advantage over Cyclemeter because it rates you against other riders. Although you can do the same thing with Cyclemeter, Strava does a much better job. Also, Cyclemeter is $5.00 and Strava has a limited version that is free. I can't remember what their paid version sells for. And Strava has a version for iOS and Droid, whereas Cyclemeter is limited to the iPhone. Like everything, it boils down to personal preference.

OP, if you are using a heart rate monitor strap with your Forerunner, you can still use that and not have to purchase another HRM if you go with a phone app. You also won't have to purchase another HRM strap if you go with any of the Garmin units.
+1 for Strave (the only with which I have any experience)... It doesn't seem to do a lot of good monitoring things while you ride. I tend to start it, put it in my pocket and, when the ride is over, take it out, stop it, and save the ride. Most of it's benefit is on the Strave web site after the ride where it shows you where you rode (with a nice map), how far, how fast and how high you went (in elevation not endorphins)... It also accumulates all of your rides so you (or your physician) can see how well (or poorly) you've been doing and prepares some nice graphs so you can easily visualize it...

For monitoring while I'm riding I use a cycle computer....

After the ride (or at the end of a week), I also post the time & distance in a spread sheet for 2 reasons:
1) You cannot download your data from Strava (except to a GPS) -- so if you leave Strava you lose all of your history.
2) I can better track maintenance on my bikes: when I changed chains or cassettes and so on...

But, like John says, it's all a matter of personal preference what pieces are most important to you...
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Old 03-17-13, 02:07 PM
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Sorry. I'm a simple country boy, I ride mostly for utility and pleasure. Why is it important to have GPS, heart rate and cadence either in one gizmo - or at all?
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Old 03-17-13, 02:27 PM
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If I were not using powe, all I would use would be strava and maybe a bt hr strap.

its useful to compare your rides to your previous rides. I like to see the current climb compare to what i did last summer or last week. I like to see the changes in my hr too.

just a nice way to track your progress and you miles.
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Old 03-17-13, 02:32 PM
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Originally Posted by martianone View Post
Sorry. I'm a simple country boy, I ride mostly for utility and pleasure. Why is it important to have GPS, heart rate and cadence either in one gizmo - or at all?
For me, it's partly so I can track my progress (or lack of as the case may be). It also helps me to track mileage on each of my bikes and their respective components for maintenance reasons...

But mostly, it provides me with an incentive. I can see where I've been and where I would like to be... ("85 miles this week -- I need another 15 to my hundred"...) Or, "Geez! I just missed 3 days in a row! -- Gotta get back on the bike!"

But just riding is fine... Actually, that's what I do when I'm on the bike -- just ride.

Checking where I've been and how far and how high and how fast comes in later, at home when I'm off the bike.
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Old 03-17-13, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by martianone View Post
Sorry. I'm a simple country boy, I ride mostly for utility and pleasure. Why is it important to have GPS, heart rate and cadence either in one gizmo - or at all?
Some riders like to track their fitness by the heart rate and/or power output with HR monitors and power meters. Just one of our sports differences between participants is all. I am one that doesn't use the meter or monitor but do take my blood pressure at rest and my HR before and after a ride, daily. This is mainly for health reasons that my doctor tracks because of my chronic renal failure that is ongoing. To each rider their own.

GPS I cannot address, my phone does this and I am registered with Strava but I haven't used it once. It allows riders to compare their performances over a course with others and it provides and way of sharing ride routes, easily.

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Old 03-17-13, 07:45 PM
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Originally Posted by martianone View Post
Sorry. I'm a simple country boy, I ride mostly for utility and pleasure. Why is it important to have GPS, heart rate and cadence either in one gizmo - or at all?
Same reason you take pictures on a vacation. Well, similar anyway. It can also help you improve if you care about that.
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Old 03-17-13, 08:03 PM
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Originally Posted by billydonn View Post
Same reason you take pictures on a vacation. Well, similar anyway. It can also help you improve if you care about that.
Yes, think I understand now. When you get old the GPS helps you remember where you have been, or where you are. Also, when the heart monitor indicates you are having a heart attack - you can use the GPS to let EMS know where you are. Different strokes, for different folks. Thanks.
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Old 03-17-13, 08:56 PM
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Originally Posted by martianone View Post
Yes, think I understand now. When you get old the GPS helps you remember where you have been, or where you are. Also, when the heart monitor indicates you are having a heart attack - you can use the GPS to let EMS know where you are. Different strokes, for different folks. Thanks.
Add to that, a lot of people, myself included, sometimes like to just go out and wander. I make sure I've got enough food and water to cover my planned distance, but don't really worry if I don't know where I'm going. If you set a turnaround distance, you can easily do this and the Garmin will get you back with no issues. A lot of people also like training with heart rate. It's not as reliable of an indicator as power, but for those who don't race, it works fine and gives you a good idea of fitness improvement since your heart rate shouldn't spike as much over time on the same tough routes as your fitness improves.
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Old 03-18-13, 04:27 AM
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I never use GPS for map reading but I do like to know how far I have ridden. That could be done with a normal computer but they require leads or sensors and batteries to set up correctly. With a GPS computer- no leads and no adjustments required to set up to different bikes as it works from satellites to tell you how far you have travelled- or where you are if that is your requirement. Another added bonus is it will tell you how high you have climbed on a single hill or for the ride and also the gradients of those hills.

On the heart monitor side and it can be used for "Medical" reasons or training. I am not out on a bike to go as fast as I can or as far as I can. I go out because I enjoy it and it keeps me fit. I could just go out and smell the roses all the time but I do like to make that effort useful on the fitness side of things. Getting the heart rate into a working zone for at least part of the ride will do that. Without a heart rate monitor I do not know if I am just turning the pedals or actually getting the heart to work as the difference is quite small at the lower end. And for those long rides that I want to finish in comfort- it will tell me if I am working too hard and will "Bonk" before the end of the ride unless I take some effort out. It will also tell me if I am not working hard enough and that I should put a bit more ffort in.

Most GPS computers will do more things than most riders require but what you do want- they do very well. And once you have one- you find out the things you do not think you want can be very useful.
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Old 03-18-13, 05:08 AM
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Originally Posted by billydonn View Post
Edge 500.
+1. You can still find them.
http://www.biketiresdirect.com/searc...FYdT4AodLmQAxA

https://www.google.com/search?q=garm...w=1024&bih=672
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Old 03-18-13, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by martianone View Post
Yes, think I understand now. When you get old the GPS helps you remember where you have been, or where you are. Also, when the heart monitor indicates you are having a heart attack - you can use the GPS to let EMS know where you are. Different strokes, for different folks. Thanks.
I'll take that as a bit of sarcasm...

Actually I got my IPhone primarily so that I would know where I was... I found myself going out for many miles on rails-to-trails and, while I could always find way back home, if I had an emergency I had no way of telling emergency services where I was. "the Montour Trail" or "Great Allegheny Passage" was about as useful as telling them "somewhere in Pennsylvania"...

In addition, as a non-biking note: When I was working Home Health, I found myself going from one place I had never heard of to another. A GPS got me from place to place reliably -- and then got me home again when I was done...

As for "remembering where you've been". Can you tell me how many miles you logged on your bike 3 months ago without one? Perhaps that is of no importance to you. But I find it useful in monitoring my fitness goals.

I find them to be extremely useful tools...
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Old 03-19-13, 08:03 AM
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Edge 500 camp here. Has everything I need; tracks HR, cadence, power which I can plug into Golden Cheetah or WKO+
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Old 03-19-13, 11:26 AM
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No apparent shortage of Edge 500s on the interwebs. I'm not sure that they are discontinued. Anyone know for sure?
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Old 03-19-13, 11:29 AM
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As Don said, the WWW has them everywhere it seems, I Googled "Edge 500" and got a big batch of links, Amazon has them in-stock too. I'm sure others will have them if Amazon does as good a unit as it is supposed to be.
http://www.amazon.com/Garmin-Edge-Cy...armin+edge+500

The Garmin site still lists the 500, also.

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Old 03-19-13, 11:59 AM
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I have an Edge 500. It has all the features I want, and is a pretty cool device, but I give it a thumbs down on reliability and stability. I have had to do a full reset on the device twice, the last time during an important ride Report trouble and you will state to have remote control service sessions via e-mail with about half a dozen techies in Mumbai, all guessing as to how to get it straightened out.
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