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Equipment List

Old 12-10-14, 09:16 PM
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Planemaker
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Equipment List

So, it looks as though I might have some extra cash to buy a few items so, I thought I would get some input from all of you. Here is my initial list

1. Repair Stand (leaning towards Park but could use some suggestions)
2. Chain breaker (I would like to be able to keep a clean chain)
3. Basic tools (I don't want to do major repair but, I would like to do some of the basics. What should I buy?)
4. Mini pumps (I am tired of transferring all of my gear from bike to bike)
5. CO2 inflation device (see 4 above)
6. Pack/Rack for my Gravel/Cross bike that will be used on self supported organized rides (friend purchased this Topeak® Cycling Accessories ? Products - DynaPack? DX (w/rain cover))

Any and all recommendations and additions are welcome.
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Old 12-10-14, 10:04 PM
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Small set of metric hex bits and the one common torqx with a screwdriver type handle

Preset 5Nm tee handle torque wrench.

Master link pliers (once you have the chain apart you need to be able to get it back together. Eliminates much cussing!)

Cone wrenches if you don't run sealed bearings

If you swap cogs;
combo chainwhip pedal wrench
Cassette lock ring tool





I wouldn't spend the money on an expensive repair stand. You can rig something with one of the fold up arm type storage brackets that's good enough for routine maintenance type tasks.

you can buy a lot of bike bling for what a repair stand will set you back.
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Old 12-11-14, 04:38 AM
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In case I didnt see it listed, get a crank puller. And definately build your own rack.
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Old 12-11-14, 05:45 AM
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Consider the optional wheel truing stand. Just a cheap one.

You might even put that thing to work on your own wheels someday, you never know.
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Old 12-11-14, 06:27 AM
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Not in the correct order, please excuse that:

1. +1 for a Park Tool work stand, and adding a wheel truing attachment. Depending on your budget, they have a few different levels, and you have the choice of a free standing model or one that bolts to a work bench, or the wall. The basic -9 and -10 models are both good solid performers for doing you own work. A tool tray is a handy addition,too.

2. Pumps and CO2 devices, Road Morph pumps or Lyzene, smoe people like the combination morels that have both a pump and the CO2 device.

3. Chain tool, Park tool, again, or get a multi tool from them, or from Pedros, with the chain tool included in its assortment. I have the PT IB-3 that I take along with me and a PT hand held full size tool for the work bench, both are sized for the 10-speed chains (make sure you get the correct size for your drive mechs.

4. Basic tools for the bench, you could either get one of the packages available from the tools companies, as well as the stores like Nashbar, or put something together yourself. I'd agree with the replies above, my personal beginning set up would include: pedal tool, chain tool, cassette tool and chain whip, torque key with several tips to suit your bicycles, good combination wenches and aset of hex keys, all in metric sizes, Torx wrenches or tips for a screwdriver handle that accepts different tips, rubber mallet, assortment of screwdrivers (straight slot, Phillips in #1 , #2 , sizes, no Reed Prince tips, and some Torx if you have the budget, a good socket set with a ratchet and extensions(metric of course.) in 1/4" drive other size drives could be used. Not meant not be all encompassing, this could get silly really quick.

I'm a tool fanatic and will buy a tool because it looks well made, not a good thing for the budget.

Racks, I cannot even begin to pretend I know anything about these, the commuters and tourers can best address that one.

Glad to hear you have some disposable income, getting a few things for your bicycle(s) is always nice, for me.

Bill
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Old 12-11-14, 06:39 AM
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1 - For stands, plenty of options, an alternate to Park is Feedback Sports, they also have the truing stand addons as #Zinger mentions

2 - park mini chain brute for carrying, Pedro, Shimano or park for shop work.

3 - For basic tools, would get what you need as you need it, the basic tool kits are a nice idea, but bike specs change so often now, than they are often out of date as soon as they come out, so you will be buying additional tools anyway. A crank puller is mention above, for a bike with a HT2 BB, this tool is no longer needed.] For a pre-set torque wrench, Topeak do this which is really useful Topeak® Cycling Accessories ? Products - ComboTorq Wrench & Bit Set

For major repairs, would count this as facing BB's / headset, the tools are not cost effective for the home mechanic, but most things can be done with a set of hex wrenches & a couple of specific tools.

6 - For the bag, Topeak make good stuff, but there are plenty of frame bag options as well which are worth a look at, see Revelate Designs LLC for ideas.
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Old 12-11-14, 08:23 AM
  #7  
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Don't forget a good quality torque wrench if you're working on carbon bikes.
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Old 12-11-14, 08:40 AM
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Mostly good advice above. I have an old Park stand. I don't like it much, because it doesn't fold up very compactly, but it is stable, and once I cut down the jaws it lets me clamp my seatpost very securely (I don't have much exposed seatpost to clamp). I'm awefully tempted by the Feedback Sports models - they look well made and they fold up nice and compact.

When I got my new road bike I had to get a new 11-speed chain tool. Ended up with a Pedros. It's worked fine the couple of times I used it to size and replace a chain.

Most non-bike specific tools, I'd head down to my local Sears and get some Craftsmans. No, they're not as good as they once were, but bikes are fairly easy on tools, so I don't think it should be a problem. For bike-specific tools, I generally stick with Park (the chain tool above being a notable exception).

I have a Topeak Road Morph on my commuter. The couple of times I've used it, it's worked well, very well. I have a Lezyne mini pump on my road bike - it works fine for finding the hole in the tube, or making sure the tire is seated properly, but getting tires up to riding pressures? I once got up to 300 strokes before I stopped counting, and I don't think I was quite up to my usual riding pressure. On my road bike I also carry a Genuine Innovations CO2 Proflate; it works very well - has a trigger that lets you control the CO2 addition so you don't have to blast it in all at once.

I use a Topeak trunk bag for commuting. I actually have a couple of them - the larger one has fold out panniers built in. They have a quick release system that works with the permanent rack on my commuter, or the seatpost-mounted rack I can attach to my road bike or fixed gear. They work pretty well, although the quick release cam on the seatpost-mounted rack bothers my legs while I'm pedaling. I just got an Arkel seatpost rack and matching trunk bag that looks like it will be an improvement over the Topeak - lighter too.

If you don't have a good floor pump, you owe it to yourself to get one; it's the most used "tool" in my garage. If you really want to splurge a little, pick up a Hirame pump head (assuming you have Presta valves) for it. The other "splurge" item is a Spurcycle bell. Ridiculously expensive for a bicycle bell, but I haven't regretted the purchase since it arrived - small, loud, looks nice. I thought my Crane bells were nice (and they still are), but the Spurcycle is in a different league.
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Old 12-11-14, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Planemaker View Post
...6. Pack/Rack for my Gravel/Cross bike that will be used on self supported organized rides...
I have several Topeak rack bags that I like, but I've got one of the Revelate Designs seat bags on my christmas list for my bikes with no rack. I have no experience with the topeak dynapack, but it does not appear to be very robust.
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Old 12-11-14, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by qcpmsame View Post
Not in the correct order, please excuse that:

Glad to hear you have some disposable income, getting a few things for your bicycle(s) is always nice, for me.

Bill
Money is not in the bank yet but, it looks like my company is going to have a decent year which could lead to some incentive pay. I will not know what the number is until the Board of Directors meets.

Now that I three bikes to maintain I am thinking a small in investment in basic tools will actually lead to some savings in the future.
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Old 12-11-14, 09:09 AM
  #11  
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Assuming you have been riding since you joined in 2013 only buy the things that you have needed but didn't have since then. If you haven't needed it yet then you probably won't. I work on my own bikes ( 5 bikes and 6000 miles between three people ) and only use metric allens, torque wrench, cassette removal tool, and air pumps. I use my hitch mounted bike rack for a work stand. I would invest more in things that make the ride more comfortable instead of buying tools you will rarely use.
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Old 12-11-14, 09:24 AM
  #12  
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I purchased the Spin Doctor G3 Work Stand at Performance Bicycle and like it a bit better than the Park stand. With three legs instead of two stabilizing it, I can swing the bike around at different angles without worry. Both stands, however, are quite good. In terms of the chain tool, I'd encourage you to get an extra pin to go with whatever model you pick. While master link pliers work extremely well, they're a bit big to carry along with you if you're doing unsupported extended miles.

In terms of basic tools, I've followed the same path with bicycle tools as I have with other tools. I buy it when I need it and buy the best I can afford at the time. A pedal wrench, crank puller, chain whip and cassette lock ring tool, 4, 5 & 6 mm hex wrenches, torque wrench, and cable cutters are the tools I use the most often. I did invest in a wheel truing stand that gets used two or three times a year and haven't regretted that purchase at all.

I'm a fan of titanium racks. They can take an incredible amount of abuse and still function well. I'm currently using Tubus racks. They are a bit pricey, but worth it IMO.

I've not completely settled on the portable tire inflation system myself yet. I carry a range of thing, with each bike having it's own. One has a Road Morph mounted on the seat tube, another has the Genuine Innovations combination mini-pump & Co2 inflator. Two others have the Barbieri Carb One Carbon Mini Pump, which works surprisingly well. And another has a Zefal HPX Frame-Fit Pump.

I just had an additional thought after reading vesteroid's post. Instead of a third hand, I use this when adjusting brakes: It actually works better than the cheapo third hand tool I have:
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Old 12-11-14, 09:30 AM
  #13  
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A good bench vise is helpful for bottom bracket cup removal, traditional screw-on freewheel removal, and old school freewheel cog swapping. A chain whip and a freewheel vise insert are indispensable for that last application.

I also find a lot of use for my cheapo micrometer caliper.

A really good cable cutter will greatly reduce frustration and save time.
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Old 12-11-14, 09:41 AM
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no pro mechanic by any means but do take care of 3 bikes.

Hozin tools to me are far superior to park. The pliers, the chain tool, and the third hand are very well done.

Park frequently goes on sale for 20% off (I think excel sports out of boulder has it now).

I could never find a tool set from those guys that worked for me, so i bought piece by piece.

There are some awesome videos online about service and adjustment...I especially like the ones from arts cyclery.
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Old 12-11-14, 10:21 AM
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I don't know how you get along without a chainbreaker! IMHO, you should carry a tool that has one with you.

Assuming you want to do this on the cheap, what I would do is start with a multitool that has most of what you need. Like this:




Only about $25. Multitools can be a PITA to deal with in getting to hard to reach places, but if you don't have one, start there.

For me, next would be multiple pumps. You're right ... it is a PITA to move equipment from one bike to another. There are some pretty decent cheap pumps out there.

Next is a work stand. I have a cheapo Minoura, and it works fine. If space is a problem, you might want to focus on one that folds up easily.

Next is a decent tool kit. I got a $100 kit at Performance that had virtually everything I needed. The quality is below that of Park and others, but sufficient for my purposes. And I replaced tools with better ones when it was clear that made sense.

CO2? Not for me. I'm not confident in it, so would carry a pump as well anyway. And if I'm going to do that, why carry CO2?

And yea ... if you have a carbon bike ... a torque wrench might save you a lot of heartache. And they are great for tightening cables and the like.
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Old 12-11-14, 11:13 AM
  #16  
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Originally Posted by kingston View Post
I have several Topeak rack bags that I like, but I've got one of the Revelate Designs seat bags on my christmas list for my bikes with no rack. I have no experience with the topeak dynapack, but it does not appear to be very robust.
I am diggin those bags. Which one are you leaning towards?
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Old 12-11-14, 11:37 AM
  #17  
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I don't see a reason to spend a lot of money of a Park bike stand when other brands work just as well for less money, Topeak has the PrepStand Elite for just $130; see: Amazon.com : Topeak PrepStand Elite Bicycle Repair Stand : Bike Workstands : Sports & Outdoors

Tool wise, don't go nuts and buy a toolbox of tools, a lot of the tools in those kits you already have at home, and a lot the tools in the kits you may never use, so instead just buy tools as you need them. There are some tools I would rarely use and found it's cheaper to take the bike into a shop and have them do it for a lot less than half the cost of the tool! Like truing stands is a great example, I never bought a truing stand in 40 years, I true my own wheels though, how you scream? by simply placing the bike upside down and using the brake calipers as my guide by slowing closing down the calipers till they just barely miss then spin the wheel and adjust the spokes. About once every 10 years or so I take the bike into a shop and have them check the tension and dish which may cost $15 to do, a $225 dollar wheel truing stand with a tensioner and dish tool buys a lot of $15 to $20 pro truing jobs at the LBS!! And a good multi tool like the Park MB3 gives you a great starter tool that you can even carry around with you when riding, though I don't like the spoke tool on it but it will work in a pinch so I use a individual Park spoke tool instead but those are cheap. The Park MB3 comes with a chain breaker and it works great. Anyway tool wise I would only buy a tool when I need it, I bought all my house tools, automotive tools, and cycling tools that way and thus have no wasted tools that never get used or redundant tools I don't need.

There are few really good mini pumps on the market, Topeak RaceRocket HP, Lezyne Road Drive (get the longest of the 3 sizes, a longer pump makes it easier to get to higher pressures and get there faster), Specialized Airtool Road Flex, all 3 of these pumps come with self contained hose that helps to take pressure off the valve stem when pumping so you don't accidentally tear the stem at the base (this didn't use to be a problem but tube manufactures in the quest to save money removed the reinforcement washer or ring that use to protect the stem from that). Another really nice pump but rather portly and ugly but works the best of any mini pump (I actually call this a mid pump not a mini) is the Topeak Road Morph G (G means it has a small built in PSI gauge), this pump is like having a mini floor pump on your bike, it has a fold out foot peg and a fold out handle making it the easiest pump to use with a lot less strokes to get to whatever pressure you want with ease vs the mini's I mentioned. So it depends on what you want, a light weight nice looking pump that will take some work to use or a heavier but far easier to operate pump that can double as a floor pump even on the road. I'm not a fan of CO2 because you have to pay for your air and you can only carry a limited supply of air, plus you have to deal with the hassle of disposal, though I see a lot of carts discarded on the side of the road...DON'T BE A PIG AND EVER DO THIS if you decide to go CO2!!! Unless your racing there is no need to have a CO2 system.

As far as a rear bag goes there are thousands of them out there, just find one you like and use it. I happen to like the Topeak brand of bags and I use the Aero Wedge one instead of the one you mentioned but only because I carry more stuff than most so I need the space. The reason I carry stuff like spare tube, spare tire, mini tool, flat repair kit, folding pliers, and other small nick nac stuff is because I ride quite a ways from home and I'm the kind of person that doesn't use my wife as a substitute mommy, so I don't even bother to carry a cell phone which in turns forces me to fix whatever is wrong and get back home on my own. Yes, I know, I'm weird.
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Old 12-11-14, 01:07 PM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by Planemaker View Post
I am diggin those bags. Which one are you leaning towards?
I'll probably get the Pika.
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Old 12-11-14, 05:00 PM
  #19  
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I am not a bicycle mechanic although I occasionally attempt to play one in my garage. It all starts with a work stand. I have a Park I bought about 20 yrs. ago and it still works as it always has. I would have no problem searching other brands but would no hesitate to buy anything from Park. Oh, while you're buying tools, parts, etc. go get yourself a can of Plexus.
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Old 12-11-14, 05:15 PM
  #20  
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The Jandd mountain wedge III holds 7.5 liters, costs around $60, and is very sturdy. I have a lot of miles on mine. It's rock stable and very sturdy.
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Old 12-11-14, 05:34 PM
  #21  
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I love my Feedback stand, and recently picked up the truing add-on.
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Old 12-11-14, 05:50 PM
  #22  
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Watch eBay for a deal on a work stand, as much as I like the Park Tool stands, at every level, I got a good buy on a Ride All Day (RAD) work stand for $39.99 a few years back. it is similar to the Park stand in design, pretty well made, and it hasn't let me down, either. These aren't always on eBay, for some reason, though, so I just forget to mention them since people cannot find them, when I recommended them to others.

I already had most of my tools since I have been involved with bicycles and racing dirt bikes for many years. I couldn't buy a big group all at once, they were built up a few at a time over my adult life, beginning at 15 when my dad gave me a starter set and box of Craftsman tools for that Christmas. Now I am up to a three box roll around mechanics level, its a serious disease, I tell you, serious.....................

Bill
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Old 12-11-14, 06:08 PM
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Keep an eye out on craigslist for stands. I bought my Park deluxe double armed repair stand with the steel plate base on CL for $50. I had to sink another $125 in new parts but that was a heck of a deal.
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Old 12-11-14, 06:34 PM
  #24  
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Buy good hex keys because you will use them a lot!
You really want a decent floor pump.
You really want a decent cable cutter too, side cutters will cause your cables to unravel, more as they wear. They also make it easy to cut compressionless shifter cable.
A good set of metric end wrenches will also be very valuable.
Get a torque wrench and use it. My Nashbar model works okay for most stuff, you may also need a larger one for BB
Get whatever specialty tools you need to remove/replace your bottom bracket. cassette/Freewheel, and a headset wrench if your bike is old enough to use a quill stem.
Get a can of grease, Park grease is pretty cheap.
Get decent cone wrenches, at least the ones to fit your bike.

Past this. it depends on whether you are just maintaining the bike you have or you're going out to find new victims.

When you are having a particularly confident day get a spoke wrench, and don't touch your good bike with it until you have practiced on lots of old wheels.


The rest of the list largely
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Old 12-11-14, 10:40 PM
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oldnslow2
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I have one of these, it makes cleaning the chain 1000 times easier and it's under $10.

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