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Danbob 04-10-16 08:56 PM

Riddle me this
 
Okay. So I went from a 56cm giant tcr that was too big for me to a properly fitted 54 cm trek domane 4.5. Everything with the new bike is magical except one thing. I can't seem to get rid of wrist/palm pain after riding more than 20 miles. I seem to be putting too much weight on the hoods when I ride. I have carbon Isozone vrc bars on it that are the proper width for me, so I know I shouldn't be having this much fatigue. The rest of the bike fits absolutely perfect. Like so well that I never thought a road bike could fit as well as this one does and have my position be so comfortable. So what should I do? Current situation is the stock 90mm stem flipped up so that the rise is 7 degrees . I have 20mm of spacers between the stem and the headset. Yeah I know I am a dork but whatever...I don't race and I have terrible flexibility so I am not into the whole stem-slamming idea unless I have to to alleviate this wrist/palm pain. Even our shop mechanic who races isn't sure what my problem is and he was the one who did my fit and said the 56 giant was too big a frame. Do I rotate the bars up? Do I get a longer stem? Higher? Lower? What? Sorry. Getting a bit nuts over this. Thanks in advance.

10 Wheels 04-10-16 09:02 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Try this..

http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=515136

pacificaslim 04-10-16 09:45 PM

Are you jamming the hood into the area between thumb and index finger? I see a lot of people do that but there is a nerve on the hand that will be irritated if you ride like that. It's better to reach your arms out like you're going to shake hands with someone, you know, palms facing each other, and then set the fleshy padded part of your hand (the karate chop spot) on to the bars. You should be able to shift and brake with your fingers from this position. In a panic you will probably rotate your hands down more, but for just cruising around try this position.

Or just pedal harder so your legs are supporting your upper body - requires core muscles and lack of gut hanging down.

Carbonfiberboy 04-10-16 09:50 PM

Well, the first thing is to present the Numb Hands post:
http://www.bikeforums.net/road-cycli...l#post12953035

The second thing to check is weight on hands, which can be set by saddle set-back. While pedaling on the flat in the hoods position, can you lift both hands off the bars for a bit without sliding forward on the saddle? If you slide, the saddle is too far forward. I have a longish torso. I have to use a setback seatpost and slide my saddle almost all the way back.

Wheever 04-10-16 10:00 PM


Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy (Post 18680857)
Well, the first thing is to present the Numb Hands post:
http://www.bikeforums.net/road-cycli...l#post12953035

The second thing to check is weight on hands, which can be set by saddle set-back. While pedaling on the flat in the hoods position, can you lift both hands off the bars for a bit without sliding forward on the saddle? If you slide, the saddle is too far forward. I have a longish torso. I have to use a setback seatpost and slide my saddle almost all the way back.

+1

texbiker 04-10-16 10:28 PM

The weight should be balanced on the three contact points: feet, butt and hands. From what you describe I think your saddle is not properly positioned. I like to adjust the saddle to be level using a small level. Be sure the whole bike is standing on a level spot or put it in a stand. Next you want to check the forward position of the saddle. Too far back and you have to lean forward too much to reach the brake levers.

oldbobcat 04-10-16 11:01 PM


Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy (Post 18680857)
The second thing to check is weight on hands, which can be set by saddle set-back. While pedaling on the flat in the hoods position, can you lift both hands off the bars for a bit without sliding forward on the saddle? If you slide, the saddle is too far forward. I have a longish torso. I have to use a setback seatpost and slide my saddle almost all the way back.

The third thing to look at is your handlebar height. Believe it or not, your back has an angle it prefers to be at when you're riding a bike, and if it's lower than what your handlebar and arms will allow, there will be more than just the mass of your upper body bearing down on your hands. There will be conflict, your lower back muscles trying to lower your shoulders and your arms trying to raise them. After finding your balance using saddle setback, see what it feels like to ride with your hands resting lightly over the hoods. Then adjust handlebar height to where this becomes second nature.

FBinNY 04-10-16 11:17 PM

get on your bike and ride on the hoods (the problem position) as you normally do. Get a friend to ride beside you a few away and snap a decent photo of of your arm and hand on the bike.

Now hold your arm out in front of you and notice how your hand's neutral position is aligned with your arm. If the photo reveals that it isn't when you ride, that bend may be putting pressure on a nerve or otherwise causing irritation or pain.

The solution is to move the levers up or down to find a comfortable position where the arm and hand align. No guaranty this solves it, so try the easy way, by simply rotating the bars slightly in the stem. If it does work you can put the bars back if you want, and moving the levers.

Danbob 04-11-16 06:36 PM

Thanks guys! I have a lot of homework to do now. I am a teacher, but when I am not teaching I work at my lbs . I have never in my eight years of working there , fit someone or had a customer who had this problem believe it or not. 99 percent of the time it is seat height, frame size, or stem length. Then again, most of our customers are not serious roadies and ride hardcore mountain, or touring style road/hybrid. All of us who work there except our mechanic who is a pro roadie are mountain bikers who have converted to road. First line of business is going to be putting back the 10mm spacer that I took out to see if that helps. Then if that doesn't work, I will play with the stem flipping/length/bar position. I am so close to that perfect fit. Closer than I have ever been, but before I never had hand pain and everything else was not as comfortable LOL.

Danbob 05-02-16 08:56 PM

resurrecting from the dead....So I can't get rid of the hand pressure still. No pinched nerves, nothing like that, just too much weight on the fleshy parts of my palms which leaves me with soft tissue pain after rides. Everything on the bike is perfect except for this still. Someone watched me ride the other day and suggested keeping the stem rise exactly the same but getting a longer stem than a 90mm - like a 100 or 105. He said it would take pressure off my hands by elongating my reach slightly, but it would keep the height and bars the same otherwise. Sound like a good idea that might work? I always thought 80-90mm is a bit short for a stem on a properly fitted road bike frame. What do you guys think? could it help?

FBinNY 05-02-16 09:14 PM

This is just about 100% impossible to discuss intelligently without seeing you on the bike. Actually, it might involve riding with you for an hour or so to see how you hold the bars and what you look like in various positions. It would also help to know how often you mve your hands, and which positions you use the most, and which cause the rpoblem.

Without seeing, I can't actually advise, but consider: if you switch to a longer stem to increase the reach, you might react by spending less time on the levers on in the drops and more time on the tops of the bars, either near the center, or on the curve to the levers. If either of those positions are more painful, then the longer stem would be counter-productive.

I raise the point to show you that everything is connected to everything else, and changes lead to changes. Feel free to try anything, but before you start changing stuff willy-nilly try to get a sense of where the issues are.

berner 05-03-16 11:46 AM

If all the solutions that seem to make sense are not working, try some solutions that don't make sense. We are all different so that common solutions will not be suitable for everyone. Try lowering the bars just a bit, say 5 mm and tipping them up just a bit also. Dropping the bars will change the angle that the wrist makes and so will tipping them up. This sort of tinkering costs nothing but a little time.


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