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5'10" a 54 or 56cm frame?

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5'10" a 54 or 56cm frame?

Old 11-27-17, 11:15 AM
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5'10" a 54 or 56cm frame?

Looking at the Fuji Jari.

My other bike is a Giant TCR 53.5 cm and I'd like to have a more upright ride.

54 or 56?
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Old 11-27-17, 11:50 AM
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It would be good to know the center-to-center measurements of the seat tube and the top tube. If the 56 has a 56cm top tube and 56cm seat tube, or even a 57cm top tube, go for it. Some bikes vary greatly on the measurements, so you have to take all the maintubes into account. An angled top tube will require a longer tube, so in your case, even a 58cm top tube would be okay, if it is angled. The 54cm will work, but you might have to put a 110mm stem on it, get a long seatpost and position your saddle way back on the rails.
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Old 11-27-17, 05:56 PM
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There is more to fitting a bike frame than height. Height quickly narrows the range, but inseam from tight in the crotch to the ground is the next needed piece. Then arm lengths come into play too. So there is always a range of frame sizes that can be fit to you.

Despite being a gravel bike the fujari looks like it's intended for a racing type posture. So trying to make a more upright posture with it's geometry is probably going to make it look odd.

A smaller frame might be a better way to go if you are dead set on the fujari and want the upright posture. Then you won't need as much change to the stem reach and such.
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Old 11-27-17, 06:03 PM
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Actually wouldn't a bigger frame with a shorter stem be better for upright in most cases? With a bigger frame the handle bars move up relative to the saddle which stays at the same height. In fact the saddle position may even lower on a bigger frame if the crank arms are longer on a bigger frame, which they often are.

Smaller frames are more aggressive and less upright - the bar height drops relative to the saddle.

Last edited by GeneO; 11-27-17 at 06:31 PM.
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Old 11-27-17, 06:58 PM
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I looked at the geometry chars for the Fuji.

The saddle will sit at the same height above the BB on either when fit properly. The stack (vertical distance from BB to top of the head tube) of the 54 is 12 mm higher than the 52 cm frame. This means the bars will be half an inch higher relative to the saddle on the 54 cm frame.

But you best try them out and get a shops opinion, it all depends on your body build.
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Old 11-27-17, 07:15 PM
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Originally Posted by GeneO
Actually wouldn't a bigger frame with a shorter stem be better for upright in most cases? With a bigger frame the handle bars move up relative to the saddle which stays at the same height. In fact the saddle position may even lower on a bigger frame if the crank arms are longer on a bigger frame, which they often are.
I wouldn't think so. For certain I'm not an expert. I would think that handlebars stay the same relative to seat height as you move up in frame size. The assumption I'm making is that the manufacturer intends a particular ride postion for a particular bike. The Fujari being intended to be a racing gravel bike makes me think it will have a more stretched out fit than a touring road bike or hybrid.

If the OP is short in the legs and long in the arms, then a bigger frame might work. But again, I'm just guessing and lurking here to see what those that claim to know say.

Originally Posted by GeneO
Smaller frames are more aggressive and less upright - the bar height drops relative to the saddle.
Smaller frames more aggressive? Maybe I don't use aggressive correctly when talking about fit. To me, when I hear aggressive fit, then I'm thinking that means a more aerodynamic position going toward that of a time trialer or other relatively short race where power output is more important than comfort.

Within any particular model of bike I wouldn't think they intend the frame to be more aggressive from one size to the other as they are looking to fit different size people to that intended position the bike is made for.

However from the aspect that we are talking about one particular person, I suppose you might be able to generalize that smaller might be more aggressive for that person, but again, I think it can go either way depending on whether that person has long legs short arms or short legs short arms and several other things.
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Old 11-27-17, 08:13 PM
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No, the handlebars won't stay the same between frames. The first thing you do in a fit is to adjust the saddle height and its fore/aft position to get you fit for proper pedaling. The proper position for your body will be a certain vertical height above the bottom bracket and a certain amount setback measured horizontally from the bottom bracket. No matter shat size of bike you choose, this height and offset relative to the bottom bracket won' t change as it is the correct position for your body pedaling (with a little bit of slop). Saddle setback and height relative to the bottom bracket are pretty much invariant across sizes.

Now if you go to a larger size bike, the stack (basically vertical distance from the BB to the bars) will increase. The seat tube, seat angle top tube, BB height etc. will also change, but then when you position your saddle to get the proper fit for pedaling, it will be the same height above the bottom bracket (or slightly shorter for a larger frame that may have longer crank arms). So the saddle is lower relative to the bars on a size with a larger stack. When you want to know how much this changes with different sizes, compare the bike geometry stacks.

Then you adjust to the proper reach by changing the stem length the and the bar height to some level by adding or removing spacers.

Smaller is more aggressive because there is more drop to the bars from the saddle, making it less upright and more aero

Yes, that is what I meant, within a particular brand, any size is probably no more aggressive than another, given that each bike size is made for a person of a certain height range and assuming a riding position for the average rider for that model . But given a person of a certain size, a smaller bike will be more aggressive (aero) and a bigger less (more upright).

But really you should go in and try one out and have a shop help you pick the size. The right size/fit also depends on your fitness level, your peculiar body geometry, and how you intend to ride.

Last edited by GeneO; 11-27-17 at 08:18 PM.
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Old 11-28-17, 01:00 PM
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I am 5'10" and went with a 56 LHT. The larger frame will allow you to get the handlebars up higher without using so many spacers compared to a smaller frame, usually. I am quite comfortable on the bike.
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Old 11-29-17, 12:22 PM
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Appreciate the replies.

I've got a 31" inseam.

The 56 is about 1/2" less reach and 1" more rise than my Giant 53.5cm. I think that's a racing posture. So this should be better.

The 54cm didn't seem that much shorter reach...and the stack height was equal to my current bike...so base on that geometry I'd figure the seat may sit higher relative to the handlebars and put them marginally closer...I.e., another racing posture.

I'm not looking to ride a cruiser here. They're all drop bar, but I want what's currently known as endurance geometry. I expect to sit up closer to 20 degrees than 45.

Somebody needs to make a wireframe simulator for the bike and you.
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Old 11-30-17, 04:28 PM
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Dont want a really low bent over race posture? 56 is my horizontal top tube C&V road bike, 58 may be better ,

but sloping top tubes have shorter seat tubes and that is where frame size is measured look at the top tube length too ..

the stem length is an adjustment you make then.






....

Last edited by fietsbob; 11-30-17 at 04:33 PM.
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