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Drop bar & Upright Posture

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Drop bar & Upright Posture

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Old 05-14-18, 12:33 PM
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Drop bar & Upright Posture

I have a problem with my neck flexibility. So I cannot lean forward much.
I got a properly sized road bike for my size; I swapped the shortest stem, the most compact drop bar, and raised the bar very high...but the Reach to the Hood is still too far away.


So here's my idea: (1) get a touring/gravel bike frame one or two size too small, (2) raise the handlebar height, and (3) use the shortest stem extension.
Now riding on the Hood should be perfect!
And upright posture like below.
Is this a good idea? Will the handling be funky and wierd?


I'm planning this to be a serious long distance endurance machine for interstate travel.


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Old 05-14-18, 02:15 PM
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GailT
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
I have a problem with my neck flexibility. So I cannot lean forward much.
I got a properly sized road bike for my size; I swapped the shortest stem, the most compact drop bar, and raised the bar very high...but the Reach to the Hood is still too far away.
What bike did you get originally, and have you compared its stack and reach to other road bikes? You might be able to find a properly sized endurance/road bike with higher stack and shorter reach, for example, check the dimensions on the Specialized Diverge compared to other road bikes.
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Old 05-14-18, 02:16 PM
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Clem von Jones
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I have bad arthritis but even after winter when I'm fat and weak I have no problem getting an aero position. Are you certain this isn't just a delusion? I see cyclists go way overboard trying to achieve an upright posture and then complaining about how uncomfortable they are. Maybe there's a connection.
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Old 05-14-18, 02:21 PM
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Originally Posted by GailT View Post
What bike did you get originally, and have you compared its stack and reach to other road bikes? You might be able to find a properly sized endurance/road bike with higher stack and shorter reach, for example, check the dimensions on the Specialized Diverge compared to other road bikes.
I'm on a Windsor Wellington 54cm ett...which has a traditional flat top tube geometry.
I would be looking for maybe a 50cm ett.


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Old 05-14-18, 02:33 PM
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You might find a smaller bike that also has a higher front end than your current bike, but if you are serious about riding long distances and you have a medical issue, I wouldn't keep buying bikes and go to a PT or fitter to figure out what will actually work.
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Old 05-14-18, 02:59 PM
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Bikes designated as 'women's bikes' usually have shorter top tubes. Have you tried one of those out?
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Old 05-14-18, 04:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
go to a PT
It's like I have Shermer's Neck. I always try to tough it out. But I do core exercise. I do neck exercise. They help...but can't git rid of it completely.

Originally Posted by philbob57 View Post
Bikes designated as 'women's bikes' usually have shorter top tubes. Have you tried one of those out?
No, I haven't seen any women's road biike. I thought they're just with compact drops and short reach levers, and wider saddles.

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Old 05-14-18, 04:28 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
I have a problem with my neck flexibility. So I cannot lean forward much.
I got a properly sized road bike for my size; I swapped the shortest stem, the most compact drop bar, and raised the bar very high...but the Reach to the Hood is still too far away.


So here's my idea: (1) get a touring/gravel bike frame one or two size too small, (2) raise the handlebar height, and (3) use the shortest stem extension.
Now riding on the Hood should be perfect!
And upright posture like below.
Is this a good idea? Will the handling be funky and wierd?


I'm planning this to be a serious long distance endurance machine for interstate travel.

Faced with the same problems and questions, I ultimately found the best solution for me was, after decades of riding drop bars, to drop the drops altogether in favor of an upright riding position. I bought a Trek FXs6 carbon, put a taller stem on it. It has made endurance rides infinitely more comfortable. IMHO, go flat bars on your endurance bike frame.
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Old 05-14-18, 05:04 PM
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Also take a look at Jones Bars and Trekking Bars.
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Old 05-14-18, 08:59 PM
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As an avid road rider for over forty years I have seen a huge change in the way that people ride road bikes, especially since the advent of the hands on type brake shifters. A lot of riders now try to ride all of the time on the brake hoods because they want to be close to the controls. (bad) I do not know if this will help, but I have always, and still do ride about 80 percent of the time on the tops (closer reach) hoods are for braking shifting and off the saddle climbing, but not something that I would recommend to stay on all of the time. I knew a women in San Diego who had a custom frame built with a supper short top tube, so she could be on the hoods all of the time. She eventually got a "normal frame" after her coach schooled her on riding position, in regards to riding all of the time on the hoods.
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Old 05-14-18, 09:40 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
I have a problem with my neck flexibility. So I cannot lean forward much.
I got a properly sized road bike for my size; I swapped the shortest stem, the most compact drop bar, and raised the bar very high...but the Reach to the Hood is still too far away.


So here's my idea: (1) get a touring/gravel bike frame one or two size too small, (2) raise the handlebar height, and (3) use the shortest stem extension.
Now riding on the Hood should be perfect!
And upright posture like below.
Is this a good idea? Will the handling be funky and wierd?


I'm planning this to be a serious long distance endurance machine for interstate travel.

Getting a smaller bike will make you less upright, then you have to compensate. A larger bike puts the saddle lower with respect to the bars than a smaller bike. What you want a larger bike with a shorter stem.
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Old 05-15-18, 12:21 AM
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Old 05-15-18, 01:02 AM
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https://www.ebay.com/itm/2018-Mosaic...item52091daaa8

520 ETT. Stack 585. Reach 345.

What you really need is a custom frame at your size with a very short reach and a very tall stack height. Kind of like that Mosaic custom geo frame, but not at the crazy high price.

I've come across such used frames online occasionally.


Another cheaper consideration might be the production ti frameset Lynskey Backroads in size small: 525 ETT. Stack is 593. Reach is 353.

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Old 05-15-18, 08:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Brian25 View Post
I have always, and still do ride about 80 percent of the time on the tops (closer reach) hoods are for braking shifting and off the saddle climbing, but not something that I would recommend to stay on all of the time.
Interesting. While the Top is comfortable and upright, I felt lack of control . On the Corners, I felt more control but uncomfortable on the wrist. Maybe it's 'cuz the bar is too narrow (40 cm).

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Old 05-15-18, 09:18 AM
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Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
also take a look at jones bars and trekking bars.
+1
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Old 05-15-18, 10:24 AM
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I'm finding that sitting upright more makes for a sore butt on longer rides. If I get to the point where I can't raise my head up enough to see when in the drops or stretched across the hoods, I might start considering a recumbent. There have been more than a few people on recumbent bicycles.... not those low riding recumbent tricycles.... come through my area while riding the Natchez trace. They were loaded down with panniers front and back and some with trailers too. So I know they were doing some serious endurance riding.
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Old 05-15-18, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
Also take a look at Jones Bars and Trekking Bars.
They look great for a adventure bike, but they seem too wide for a road bike.
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Old 05-15-18, 10:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
I'm finding that sitting upright more makes for a sore butt on longer rides. If I get to the point where I can't raise my head up enough to see when in the drops or stretched across the hoods, I might start considering a recumbent. There have been more than a few people on recumbent bicycles.... not those low riding recumbent tricycles.... come through my area while riding the Natchez trace. They were loaded down with panniers front and back and some with trailers too. So I know they were doing some serious endurance riding.
Recumbents! I forgot about those. Yeah...I don't like the way they look...but I am beginning to admit to myself that might be the only option left for me. I feel like every time I do another long ride, my neck is a little worse. THe Recumbents just look so heavy and expensive. I saw a guy struggling mightily on the rolling hills that are easy on a regular bike, and I said to myself that's not for me.
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Old 05-16-18, 09:15 AM
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If you'd like to stick with drop bars get a Salsa Vaya. They have a relatively high stack (headtube height from ground) and short reach compared to most other bikes that are designed for drop bars. They're nice bikes and readily available used if you're a bit patient.
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Old 05-17-18, 09:44 AM
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bikes direct imports, warehouses, and ships bikes in boxes,,
to get a higher bar ask them to ship a 2nd fork with an un-cut steerer too .

A bike shop would maybe give you a bit of trade in of shorter fork, if you bought a bike from them ,
but you skip those benefits by going with BD.
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Old 05-17-18, 11:19 AM
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I got my LHT with an uncut fork. I also went with the larger of the two sizes that would fit me. I could have used a 54, but went with the 56. The result is I can get the bars higher without a huge stack of spacers. I now have the bars level with the seat, but on one tour I had the bars way up high, and I still had room to go higher. I am more comfortable with the bars lower though, and found the neck issue was helped by a longer stem, letting my back stretch out more. With the stem shorter, my back was more rounded, making it necessary to lift my head more than with the longer stem.

Here is the LHT with the bars high.
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Old 05-17-18, 12:05 PM
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None of this is new or unexplored territory. Road bikes with drop bars set high and back are Rivendell's basic shtick.
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Old 05-17-18, 02:40 PM
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I have a similar problem with my first drop bar bike. I'm still not comfortable braking from the hood, the ergonomics never seems right to me. I added interrupter brake levers which allowed me to brake from the tops. Now I can ride on the hoods when I want but brake from the top where I can get more leverage.
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Old 05-17-18, 04:35 PM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
None of this is new or unexplored territory. Road bikes with drop bars set high and back are Rivendell's basic shtick.
Not just raising. I already have my bar raised very high. I noticed that raising up but Reach is not addressed...result is your hand is high in front of you, lack of leverage to hold up my upperbody...so my head drop and my shoulder shrugging.

What I am saying is instead of going High...go Back.


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Old 05-17-18, 04:39 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
Not just raising. I already have my bar raised very high. I noticed that raising up but Reach is not addressed...result is your hand is high in front of you, lack of leverage to hold up my upperbody...so my head drop and my shoulder shrugging.

What I am saying is instead of going High...go Back.
Umm, did I say "just raise"? Read my post again.
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