Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fitting Your Bike
Reload this Page >

Most overthought bikefitting measurements?

Notices
Fitting Your Bike Are you confused about how you should fit a bike to your particular body dimensions? Have you been reading, found the terms Merxx or French Fit, and donít know what you need? Every style of riding is different- in how you fit the bike to you, and the sizing of the bike itself. Itís more than just measuring your height, reach and inseam. With the help of Bike Fitting, youíll be able to find the right fit for your frame size, style of riding, and your particular dimensions. Here yaí goÖ..the location for everything fit related.

Most overthought bikefitting measurements?

Old 09-25-19, 12:03 AM
  #26  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 7,299

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn

Mentioned: 113 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4001 Post(s)
Liked 468 Times in 300 Posts
I dunno where y'all are seeing people with their saddles too high. I don't think I've seen an obviously too-high saddle (complete with rocking hips) more than 3-4 times, total.

Now saddle obviously too low, with knees splayed out to the sides on every pedal stroke? Several times a day. Every day.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 09-25-19, 05:34 PM
  #27  
Loose Chain
Senior Member
 
Loose Chain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 2,071

Bikes: 84 Pinarello Trevisio, 86 Guerciotti SLX, 96 Specialized Stumpjumper, 2010 Surly Cross Check, 88 Centurion Prestige, 73 Raleigh Sports, GT Force, Bridgestone MB4

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 278 Post(s)
Liked 62 Times in 49 Posts
Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
I dunno where y'all are seeing people with their saddles too high. I don't think I've seen an obviously too-high saddle (complete with rocking hips) more than 3-4 times, total.

Now saddle obviously too low, with knees splayed out to the sides on every pedal stroke? Several times a day. Every day.
I see the too low saddle and splayed out legs all the time too. I think some people are just bow legged maybe. But I also see many, many too high saddles with the legs at full extension, a dropped hip and a pointed toe.
Loose Chain is offline  
Old 09-25-19, 05:43 PM
  #28  
sumgy
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
sumgy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 738
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 356 Post(s)
Liked 74 Times in 52 Posts
Originally Posted by Loose Chain View Post
I see the too low saddle and splayed out legs all the time too. I think some people are just bow legged maybe. But I also see many, many too high saddles with the legs at full extension, a dropped hip and a pointed toe.
Agree about the too high saddles and the pedal strokes that they display.
Sometimes they also "snap" one knee or the other through the pedal stroke, or just rock from side to side.

Often the guys I see with the splayed out legs are trying to pedal around a belly.
sumgy is offline  
Old 09-25-19, 05:49 PM
  #29  
Loose Chain
Senior Member
 
Loose Chain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 2,071

Bikes: 84 Pinarello Trevisio, 86 Guerciotti SLX, 96 Specialized Stumpjumper, 2010 Surly Cross Check, 88 Centurion Prestige, 73 Raleigh Sports, GT Force, Bridgestone MB4

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 278 Post(s)
Liked 62 Times in 49 Posts
Originally Posted by sumgy View Post

Often the guys I see with the splayed out legs are trying to pedal around a belly.
Indeed you are correct.
Loose Chain is offline  
Likes For Loose Chain:
Old 11-03-19, 03:44 PM
  #30  
abone
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Richmond BC
Posts: 23

Bikes: Specialized Tarmac Comp, Nishiki Superbe, Dahon MU P8 folder, Dahon Mariner D8, Xootr Swift

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Great thread, and timely for me. I have two road bikes - a 58cm 1978 Nishiki Superbe and a 56cm 2010 Specialized Tarmac. I am 5'10 tall with 33" inseam, but my ape index is very apish....+10cm. When I bought the Nishiki I didn't give sizing any consideration...just bought what the guy said was the right size. The Tarmac was fitted by the bike shop.

I prefer to ride the old Nishiki, maybe because I've owned it for 41 years, or because its steel, or because of my ape index? I'm thinking about frame size again because I'm kicking around the idea of picking up an old Marinoni and not sure if I should look for a 56 or 58cm?

What gets me overthinking this is my standover on the Nishiki is pretty much zero. Maybe a finger width with my cycle shoes on.

Reading all the fit articles and guides lands me on a 56cm, but the Tarmac always feels twitchy, and I'm right over the bars. The Nishiki feels right while on the bike...but that damn standover height....does make it more cumbersome for getting on and off.

I'm not experienced enough to say for sure but I suspect a vintage steel frame might be just right for me in a 56cm.

Last edited by abone; 11-14-19 at 09:01 PM.
abone is offline  
Old 11-03-19, 04:39 PM
  #31  
Phamilton
Virgo
 
Phamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: KFWA
Posts: 1,193

Bikes: A touring bike and a hybrid

Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 434 Post(s)
Liked 51 Times in 39 Posts
I dunno what measurements everybody else overthinks but Iíve spent too much time on my saddle height. Seems for a long time I wasnít using a good reference point. I now measure BB to where my sit bones hit the saddle. Setting it by feel never worked for me. Too cheap for a pro fit. I have some asymmetry in my legs which has been a challenge. Lemondís formula works for me starting with a good reference point. 34 1/2Ē cycling inseam, saddle height 30 1/2Ē. I think saddle height might be a misnomer. I think you can have the same saddle ďheightĒ in different saddle positions, as you slide the saddle forward on the rails move the post up to compensate, it moving it back on the rails move the post down. Iím probably all wet but thatís where Iím at currently and applying that philosophy to 2
different bikes yields a similar overall feel despite differences in saddle type, bike geometry, handlebar size and position, and stem length between the two bikes. These bikes are commuters so Iím on one or
the other daily and sometimes several times a day.

Phamilton is online now  
Old 11-03-19, 04:50 PM
  #32  
Phamilton
Virgo
 
Phamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: KFWA
Posts: 1,193

Bikes: A touring bike and a hybrid

Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 434 Post(s)
Liked 51 Times in 39 Posts
Also, I can tolerate most saddles as long as the saddle height/setback is good for me and the saddle isnít too wide, every saddle thatís been comfortable for me has been no wider than about 5 1/2Ē or 140mm, pretty narrow. At 5í12Ē and 185lbs Iím not skinny but Iím narrow from the hips down. (I once heard someone describe it as ďspider diseaseĒ - as one approaches middle age they find the belly getting plumper and the limbs getting skinnier).
I never consider standover. I ride 58cm or 23Ē
frames and always have clearance. I had minimal but sufficient clearance on some 25Ē frame bikes I used to have. I agree with others who have said if you canít stand over the bike, the frame is too big. Also if your saddle is slammed, the frame is too big. I donít know about othersí experiences but I can tell the difference in feel between two different size frames set up to fit the same. Itís a big reason I got rid of the 25Ē frames I had, they just didnít feel right, even after adjusting stem and bars to match overall position of one of my 23Ē frame bikes. An expert could probably explain but an expert I am not. I am, however a daily bike commuter and I place a high value on a similar overall experience between the bikes that Iím commuting on. For me a 1/4Ē difference in saddle position feels like having to learn a new bike. I donít want to have to think about how this bike feels different than that one. I just want to get to work every day comfortably and as efficiently as possible. Itís routine. Utilitarian. I donít need every ride to be an adventure. I donít like surprises on my way to work (like why does my knee hurt all of a sudden?).
In summary, I guess - in my own personal experience saddle position relative to crank has been the biggest single factor in overall comfort on AND off the bike. So although I have tended to overthink, it was only because I didnít want to pay someone else to do the thinking for me.

When you do it every day for long periods of time, if something or the other is off very far with your fit, your body will inform you. So Iíd say it also depends on how much and how often you ride whether or not any particular dimension of bike fit is at all worth thinking about very much. Seeing what other people look like while theyíre riding their own bikes is a really poor indicator of what to expect from your own experience. When I see other people on bikes Iím focused on not hitting them, I donít really understand how people find the time to think about how someone elseís bike seems to fit them, or how far their knees stick out, etc. Like who is actually looking at that.

I hope this info has been helpful to OP.

Last edited by Phamilton; 11-03-19 at 05:59 PM.
Phamilton is online now  
Old 11-04-19, 09:25 AM
  #33  
burnthesheep
Newbie racer
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 1,249

Bikes: Propel, red is faster

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 565 Post(s)
Liked 212 Times in 142 Posts
I guess it's fit related, but I'd advocate for more rec riders to run aero drop bars.

Why? Hand positions and comfort. That big flat top feels awesome climbing with hands on the bar tops.

Also, it gives you an extra hoods position with less reach and one with more reach (depending on how much reach you choose to run).

You can buy them these days plenty wide also, so no worries there.

Just give it a shot and you might be amazed.
burnthesheep is offline  
Old 11-10-19, 04:58 PM
  #34  
linberl
Senior Member
 
linberl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 2,603

Bikes: 2017 Bike Friday PakiT. Dahon Mu Uno (trailer bike) Sold: 2003 Bike Friday NWT, 1997 Trek 720, 1993 Trek 520)

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1032 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 33 Posts
I'm not sure any measurement is over-thought as being wrong can cause all kinds of pain, lol. If my saddle height is off even a cm, one of my knees hurts. It's taken a really long time to get the precise setting and scribe the post. Handlebar width is another that mostly you can ignore but, if you're like me, with narrow shoulders, it is important. I've been trimming my bars slowly to find the right spot. Saddle tilt isn't a big deal to me; either it's too up or it is not, doesn't seem to require precision. Fore-aft is the same, either it's good or not but there's wiggle room for error. Reach is the same; I can tolerate a 10mm error but it does feel better when really correct. Now as to saddle....that's critical and what fits your bum is not going to be perfect for others. I tried so hard to love a Brooks saddle but it just didn't love my butt. Now I've got Fizik saddles and I absolutely love them, but I've read posters here who hate them, lol. So I'd say in order of importance:
1. saddle
2. seat height
3. handlebar width
4. reach
5. fore/aft
6. crank length
But that's just my priorities when I get a new bike. Standover height is a non-issue as I ride step through.
linberl is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
maartendc
Fitting Your Bike
6
05-24-16 10:34 AM
abby4000
Road Cycling
10
07-25-13 12:27 AM
jim p
Fifty Plus (50+)
23
05-07-12 05:48 PM
wstandis
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
23
04-29-10 09:01 PM
Dguy
Road Cycling
38
03-05-10 09:08 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.