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Flipping stem?

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Flipping stem?

Old 10-15-20, 06:12 PM
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SkipII
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Flipping stem?

I keep seeing comments about flipping the stem as a factor in fitment. What does that mean?
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Old 10-15-20, 06:35 PM
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Because they are angled, flipping it over on the steerer tube changes the height of the bars
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Old 10-15-20, 07:03 PM
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Originally Posted by psychodad View Post
Because they are angled, flipping it over on the steerer tube changes the height of the bars
I guess this will make sense when I get the bike, but...

I see some kind of fastener at the top of the shaft. Does that also attached if the tube is flipped over?

When you say it changes the height of the bars, in what way? Up or down?
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Old 10-15-20, 07:09 PM
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Up or down depends on the direction you flip it. If it is angled up, flipping it to be angled down will lower the bar height. There is also usually spacers that can be removed from under and placed on top of the stem to change the height.
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Old 10-15-20, 07:29 PM
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Originally Posted by psychodad View Post
Up or down depends on the direction you flip it. If it is angled up, flipping it to be angled down will lower the bar height. There is also usually spacers that can be removed from under and placed on top of the stem to change the height.
If you can hagn with me on this a bit, I'm still not understanding.

Flip up or down? Do you mean taking something out the stem tube? From pictures, it appears the bike frame itself determines the angle of the stem, so I'm baffled about how flipping anything changes it.

Also when you say you can take spacers out and put on top to change the height, I assume you mean it lowers the height?

My concern is that the bike I have ordered might have bars a bit too low, so it matters greatly to understand if I have some way to move the bars up.
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Old 10-15-20, 07:34 PM
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Try looking at this.

https://flatbike.com/five-ways-to-ra...ur-handlebars/
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Old 10-15-20, 07:37 PM
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Originally Posted by psychodad View Post
Thanks, got it now.

The pictures of the Poseiden X show a stem that is already angled up, so flipping will not help to raise it. Perhaps a longer (higher) aftermarket stem will work if there is enough room on the cables.

Thanks. I understand and now know what to do!
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Old 10-21-20, 07:37 AM
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Originally Posted by SkipII View Post
Thanks, got it now.

The pictures of the Poseiden X show a stem that is already angled up, so flipping will not help to raise it. Perhaps a longer (higher) aftermarket stem will work if there is enough room on the cables.
most modern bikes have a stack of spacers under the stem that you can adjust. remove one spacer and put it on top of the stem, and you've just lowered the handlebar. if the stem is already at the top of the steering tube of the fork, you cannot put any more spacers under the to raise it. so you can get a stem with an increased upward angle to raise it. at some point, you may need new cables and housing to accommodate the higher position.

the other option is to replace the handlebar with one that has a bit of rise. Specialized offers the Hover Bar and Surly has the Truck Stop bar, for example. there are a few others.

finally, consider using a shorter stem. if the handlebar feels too far away from you, moving it back can have a similar effect to moving it up. both have the effect of bringing the handlebar closer to your shoulders.

all that said, I'd take a step back before getting too drastic. start with your saddle—make sure it's in a balanced, comfortable, stable position for your pelvis so your legs can move freely and powerfully. I find that many people have their saddle too high if they went off an esoteric, over-simplified "saddle height calculation." look up "Bike Fit Advisor" on YouTube, as he has a few great videos on saddle position. others start with it too low because they have an irrational fear of falling off the bike. this leads to inefficient pedaling and probably a knee injury. if either of the above sounds like you, don't get butt-hurt over it. it's nothing personal, just a generalization.

after that, get the handlebar position where it's comfortable and confidence-inspiring. that's subjective for everyone based on a lot of factors. I think some people go too far in making their handlebar long and low because it's "aero" and their bodies are not strong enough to hold that position, leading to pain. other people are so obsessed with being beach-cruiser upright and "comfortable" that they put their handlebar sky-high and ride the bike in a top-heavy position that makes the bike's handling go to crap. There's a middle ground there and that's what you're after.
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Old 10-21-20, 07:49 AM
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Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
most modern bikes have a stack of spacers under the stem that you can adjust. remove one spacer and put it on top of the stem, and you've just lowered the handlebar. if the stem is already at the top of the steering tube of the fork, you cannot put any more spacers under the to raise it. so you can get a stem with an increased upward angle to raise it. at some point, you may need new cables and housing to accommodate the higher position.

the other option is to replace the handlebar with one that has a bit of rise. Specialized offers the Hover Bar and Surly has the Truck Stop bar, for example. there are a few others.

finally, consider using a shorter stem. if the handlebar feels too far away from you, moving it back can have a similar effect to moving it up. both have the effect of bringing the handlebar closer to your shoulders.

all that said, I'd take a step back before getting too drastic. start with your saddle—make sure it's in a balanced, comfortable, stable position for your pelvis so your legs can move freely and powerfully. I find that many people have their saddle too high if they went off an esoteric, over-simplified "saddle height calculation." look up "Bike Fit Advisor" on YouTube, as he has a few great videos on saddle position. others start with it too low because they have an irrational fear of falling off the bike. this leads to inefficient pedaling and probably a knee injury. if either of the above sounds like you, don't get butt-hurt over it. it's nothing personal, just a generalization.

after that, get the handlebar position where it's comfortable and confidence-inspiring. that's subjective for everyone based on a lot of factors. I think some people go too far in making their handlebar long and low because it's "aero" and their bodies are not strong enough to hold that position, leading to pain. other people are so obsessed with being beach-cruiser upright and "comfortable" that they put their handlebar sky-high and ride the bike in a top-heavy position that makes the bike's handling go to crap. There's a middle ground there and that's what you're after.
This is excellent. Exactly the kind of "why" that helps me understand what do to. In this case, I won't do much for a while -- get those basics adjustments right and then decide what, if anything, I need as far as reworking the stem. Thank you!
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Old 10-23-20, 10:44 AM
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And don't cut off the excess steerer tube (the tube from the fork) unless you have extreme excess (as in looks really dorky or you have way too many extra spacers stacked on top of it). At least wait until you know for sure your fit is right. Cutting a steerer too short may impact sale of a user bike because of reduced adjustment for new owner. One, or maybe two, extra spacers on top is ok (10 to 20mm), beyond that might be painful to get hit with in a crash.
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Old 10-23-20, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by bikeme View Post
And don't cut off the excess steerer tube (the tube from the fork) unless you have extreme excess (as in looks really dorky or you have way too many extra spacers stacked on top of it). At least wait until you know for sure your fit is right. Cutting a steerer too short may impact sale of a user bike because of reduced adjustment for new owner. One, or maybe two, extra spacers on top is ok (10 to 20mm), beyond that might be painful to get hit with in a crash.
Thanks for the warning, but in my case I am looking to raise the bracket on the stem, not lower it.
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