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If I want to be more upright on a hybrid, Is buying the size down an ok idea?

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If I want to be more upright on a hybrid, Is buying the size down an ok idea?

Old 02-04-22, 07:22 PM
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rbk_3
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If I want to be more upright on a hybrid, Is buying the size down an ok idea?

Looking at a Cannondale Quick 1, I am 5’11 and the M sizing recommendation is 5’5 to 5’10. So I am really close to the end range of the M and about in the middle of the L size 5’9 to 6’2.

another factor is I can get the M right now as it is in stock at the LBS and the L I would have to wait for a minimum July.


https://www.cannondale.com/en-us/bik.../quick/quick-1


here is geometry comparison

https://geometrygeeks.bike/compare/c...quick-2020-lg/
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Old 02-05-22, 02:59 PM
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For sitting more upright you would be better off with the L (24 mm higher stack).
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Old 02-05-22, 06:45 PM
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What the geometry doesn't show you is the saddle height. Go with the larger frame if the reach doesn't get too much for you. Better yet find a bike in your size with a higher stack if you can.

Your saddle will be pretty much the same height from the BB on either bike.
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Old 02-06-22, 10:08 AM
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The wrong idea as to what defines "a more upright position" paired with impatience to buy whatever is available?
​​​​​​Go on pinkbike and find yourself a size L
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Old 02-06-22, 10:15 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
For sitting more upright you would be better off with the L (24 mm higher stack).
I'm not looking at specs on that specific bike, but a larger size will usually have a longer top tube as well, meaning a longer reach so it could be more difficult to get an upright position. Chances are you can get the riding position you want on either size, with the right choice of stem and handlebars.
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Old 02-06-22, 04:10 PM
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Thanks for the replies. I am going to get to take it for a ride on the trainer at the LBS (middle of winter here) and I’ll make a decision as to whether I want to wait or not to try the Large.
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Old 02-06-22, 04:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Jeff Neese View Post
I'm not looking at specs on that specific bike, but a larger size will usually have a longer top tube as well, meaning a longer reach so it could be more difficult to get an upright position. Chances are you can get the riding position you want on either size, with the right choice of stem and handlebars.
Yes top tube is 15mm longer with a 25mm higher stack.
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Old 02-07-22, 03:44 AM
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Originally Posted by rbk_3 View Post
Yes top tube is 15mm longer with a 25mm higher stack.
The problem I can foresee here is that if you need the higher stack for a more upright position and end up fitting an extra 25 mm of stem spacers on the smaller frame, then that will make the effective frame reach even shorter (by another 8 mm or so) due to the head angle. Given that the larger frame is more matched to your height, the smaller frame might feel very cramped with the front raised. You could compensate with a longer stem on the smaller frame or a shorter one on the larger frame if it feels too long for you. But since you are in the middle of the recommended height range for the larger frame, chances are it will be more in the ballpark to start off with. Also if you increase the stack height on the large frame with stem spacers, then you also shorten the reach. IME if you are looking for a more upright riding position, then a larger frame size is easier to achieve this. Conversely, if looking for a more aggressive position people tend to size down and fit a longer stem.
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Old 02-07-22, 10:25 AM
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Best not to get so attached to a particular model of bike that you ignore other bikes that might give you the position you want without having to change up stuff. Road bikes look the epitome of cycling style and are aesthetically pleasing for many of us. But they aren't the only style of bike made to ride on the road.

If you truly want an upright sitting position then get a cruiser. Trek and a few others make bikes that are more the true cruiser geometry that I remember from the previous century. Cruisers will allow you a comfortable upright position for a leisurely ride.
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Old 02-07-22, 11:07 AM
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you obviously already have a 'bike'. which you think is creating discomfort.
unless you have a wider tire bike and are extremely comfortable in winter conditions; why are you focused on another bike right now?
nothing good will come from it.
now's a good time to focus on self-improvement.
you have months ahead to create improvement.
you have ice skating and XC skiing in your area, if those are things of interest, they're highly compatible. They'll also highlight things which are body focused.
Bike size? is an internet guess from any of us.
Ride On
Yuri
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Old 02-14-22, 10:08 AM
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These replies pretty much hit the nail right on the head.
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Old 02-16-22, 07:18 PM
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I have undersized bike. At first I tried to make up for it by buying a longer stem. To my surprise, the longer stem made it less comfortable.

Then I bought shorter stem and ironically, the shorter stem is more comfortable on the already undersized bike.

I'm not recommending you do the same but shorter reach does make you sit more upright, at least from the lower back region.

The only bad of short reach is that the ride feels a bit unstable. You'll get used to it but if you're riding with a longer reach, it could feel dangerously unstable.
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Old 02-17-22, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by qwaalodge View Post
I'm not recommending you do the same but shorter reach does make you sit more upright, at least from the lower back region.
No it doesn't. At least not in the respect of bike sizes within it's own model line or similar geometry to another.

First and most important thing on any bike is saddle height for the rider. That will be virtually the same on all bikes of that geometry. But saddle height is not something that is typically given in geometry data for a bike. What will also change when taking the bike with shorter reach is stack height which also determines your handlebar height.

On the comparison the OP gave, the smaller frame will give only a 1/4" (8 mm) less reach, but almost a full inch lower handlebars (24 mm) .

Of course you can always raise the handlebars, but many times that get quickly to the point that it looks odd or even is unsafe. Since the OP is buying a bike, they shouldn't get stuck on a bike that doesn't give them the fit they prefer in any size. They should find the one that does.

Too many people looking for a bike I think get distracted by the appeal of a certain look and then get the wrong geometry for them and try to make it work with extenders and risers and such.
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Old 02-17-22, 12:36 PM
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Iride01

First would be foot placement, second would be saddle height.

Foot placement affects saddle height, which can consequently throw off your entire fit.
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Old 02-17-22, 01:54 PM
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Foot placement isn't going to be a factor IMO for two bikes a size or two apart.

If we are going to get into that, then we need to be building a custom fit bike for the OP.
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Old 02-17-22, 08:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
On the comparison the OP gave, the smaller frame will give only a 1/4" (8 mm) less reach, but almost a full inch lower handlebars (24 mm)
You have a point. Ofc, if the reach have very little change, then it would be better to have the right size. He can still get shorter stem if he wants anyway.
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Old 02-21-22, 05:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
Iride01

First would be foot placement, second would be saddle height.

Foot placement affects saddle height, which can consequently throw off your entire fit.
Both of these are going to be the same, regardless of M or L frame. The L might have 2.5 mm longer cranks, which might affect saddle height by a fraction not really worth mentioning. The smaller frame will have considerably lower bars relative to the saddle and a bit less reach. Not really what you would want for a more upright position.
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Old 02-23-22, 04:21 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
Both of these are going to be the same, regardless of M or L frame. The L might have 2.5 mm longer cranks, which might affect saddle height by a fraction not really worth mentioning. The smaller frame will have considerably lower bars relative to the saddle and a bit less reach. Not really what you would want for a more upright position.
Looking between different sizes of a bike which fails to offer the sort of riding position which the OP is looking for, in the first place, would be a more realistic starting point (regarding what you wouldn't want for a more upright riding position)

Generally speaking, foot placement SHOULD involve the balls of each of your feet being centered over the pedal spindle, with your feet being placed close inwards (for better q factor.) This is something which is to be considered regardless of what type of bike you are riding, or what size it is. That doesn't mean that you will achieve the correct foot placement with every bike you ride. it doesn't mean there is anything wrong with adapting your fit as well as riding style to slightly different foot placement... so long as you are not pedaling with your heel or toes.

Ill say it again, a radically different foot placement from what would be considered the norm will throw off your saddle positioning and consequently, the rest of your fit.
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Old 02-24-22, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
Looking between different sizes of a bike which fails to offer the sort of riding position which the OP is looking for, in the first place, would be a more realistic starting point (regarding what you wouldn't want for a more upright riding position)

Generally speaking, foot placement SHOULD involve the balls of each of your feet being centered over the pedal spindle, with your feet being placed close inwards (for better q factor.) This is something which is to be considered regardless of what type of bike you are riding, or what size it is. That doesn't mean that you will achieve the correct foot placement with every bike you ride. it doesn't mean there is anything wrong with adapting your fit as well as riding style to slightly different foot placement... so long as you are not pedaling with your heel or toes.

Ill say it again, a radically different foot placement from what would be considered the norm will throw off your saddle positioning and consequently, the rest of your fit.
Can anyone enlighten me as to wtf this has got to do with the OP's question?

Edit: Also your "fixed" ideas about foot placement are mostly useless.
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Old 02-27-22, 08:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Best not to get so attached to a particular model of bike that you ignore other bikes that might give you the position you want without having to change up stuff. Road bikes look the epitome of cycling style and are aesthetically pleasing for many of us. But they aren't the only style of bike made to ride on the road.

If you truly want an upright sitting position then get a cruiser. Trek and a few others make bikes that are more the true cruiser geometry that I remember from the previous century. Cruisers will allow you a comfortable upright position for a leisurely ride.
As I get older, I'm finding myself looking for more upright riding position. But can't seem to find any comfort in anything but a dropbar.

I may get hardtail MTB eventually for better comfort in washboarded gravel roads but will promptly convert it to dropbar. Will definitely go for the size with small enough reach to take into account using dropbar.
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Old 02-27-22, 09:09 PM
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Originally Posted by qwaalodge View Post
As I get older, I'm finding myself looking for more upright riding position. But can't seem to find any comfort in anything but a dropbar.

I may get hardtail MTB eventually for better comfort in washboarded gravel roads but will promptly convert it to dropbar. Will definitely go for the size with small enough reach to take into account using dropbar.
look into the surly truck stop. Keep in mind the drops will be almost 10cm wider than advertised handlebar width. Soma makes a bar called the soma eagle or something which is a similar design. You could also look into a moustache bar designed for flat bar levers such as the Soma Moustache 2.

The Kona Libre looks to be biased toward drop bar comfort with the higher stack and relatively short overall reach.
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Old 02-27-22, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by rbk_3 View Post
If I want to be more upright on a hybrid, Is buying the size down an ok idea?
Originally Posted by rbk_3 View Post
I can get the M right now as it is in stock at the LBS and the L I would have to wait for a minimum July.
When you are spending this much on a brand new bike, always get the right bike.

A solution is to buy the M right now, and buy the L again later. Your LBS will love it.
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Old 03-28-22, 02:31 PM
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Go to a shop and sit on the bikes they have in those sizes and see for yourself. The stem length can often be changed to alter the seat to handlebar distance to have it closer or further away. It is the seat tube top to the top of the head tube, the effective top tube length, that is important and it can vary by more than in inch.

If I feel that I am bunched up on a frame when sitting on the seat and having my hands on the brake handles then the frame is too small for me. I know that in seconds when on the bike with the height of the seat adjusted for my leg length.
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Old 03-31-22, 10:28 AM
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I've found the sizing on various sites are generalized recommendations. They may or may not work for you. I was considering a hybrid a while back and was interested in a Trek FX 3. The site said a medium would fit me. At that time (pre-covid), the LBS had them in stock. Went to the store to try them out. The medium was too small (felt like a toy under me), while the large was a very good fit. If you're lucky enough to ride both sizes, please do. It's why I prefer to ride a bike I might buy. Less trouble than ordering one and finding the size recommendation was not for me. Unfortunately, it may not be an option in today's market.
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Old 04-02-22, 02:07 PM
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The M to L thing is a zero sum. The L has a higher stack, it also has a longer reach! If you want to sit up more you MUST get a stem extender and call it good. They are cheap, easily installed and I'm sorry, I had to skip a whole bunch of posts that were confusing the issue to a very high degree (swidt?).
https://www.flickr.com/photos/430814.../shares/x79caQ
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