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Comparison of 2 geometries, possible purchase

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Comparison of 2 geometries, possible purchase

Old 05-04-22, 10:55 AM
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TakingMyTime
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Question Comparison of 2 geometries, possible purchase

I'm considering purchasing a new bike and would like your input as to how these 2 rides will compare.

I"m 5'11" with a 32in inseam.

Currently riding a 56cm 2002 Trek 5200. I've had it for 3 years and 6000 miles, all in all it's a pretty good fit. It's just that on longer rides (35+ miles) the "race" geometry tends to wear me down (I'm 67 y/o). I'm hunched over and will strain my lower back. I'm also putting way too much weight on my hands.

I'm looking at a 2022 Ribble Endurance SL Disc - Pro (Large). Below is a comparison of the dimensions. The Trek currently has a 100mm stem and I was wondering if moving to a 90mm stem on the Ribble would help get me to a comfortable position. The Ribble will definitely get me more upright and I think that will definitely solve many of my problems.

Eff TT - Trek 56.1, Ribble 57.0

Stack - Trek 50.5, Ribble 56.2

Reach - Trek 39.0, Ribble 39.6

Head Tube - Trek 12.0, Ribble 17.0

Let me know what else you may need from me to assist in any determination.

The Trek has a zero setback seatpost and the Ribble appears to have 15-20 degree setback.

Last edited by TakingMyTime; 05-04-22 at 11:25 AM. Reason: Additional informaiton
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Old 05-04-22, 12:20 PM
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Originally Posted by TakingMyTime View Post
The Trek currently has a 100mm stem and I was wondering if moving to a 90mm stem on the Ribble would help get me to a comfortable position.
No one can answer that question for you.
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Old 05-04-22, 03:51 PM
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The frame stack on the Ribble bike is almost as low as my Specialized Tarmac. So if you don't want a race fit bike, you need to look at something else. Buying a bike that from the get go isn't intended for the position you seem to want doesn't make sense to me.

You need to find something with a stack height more in the 600 mm range when looking at the correct suggested size.

A Specialized Roubaix would be one that might fit your bill, or at least give you some comparable geometry to shop for.
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Old 05-04-22, 06:12 PM
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I might need some learnin' here but I would have thought that with the greater stack, the longer headtube and the reach being about the same that the Ribble would have me in a much more upright positi8on. I will take your advice and check these dimensions again the Roubaix and see if I can wrap my head around this a little more.
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Old 05-05-22, 09:33 AM
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I went to Ribble and tried to find the model you mentioned. I'm not entirely certain I found the correct geometry specs.

But if you are having fit issues and your body doesn't deal well with less than the perfect fit, then I'm not sure why you'd take a chance on something you can't try on and ride for several miles.

The bike size I chose based on a ride around the parking lot wasn't the size I chose after riding the same two bikes 10 miles each. I'm very glad that my LBS was willing and even encouraged me to ride each that far prior to making a purchase.
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Old 05-05-22, 09:54 AM
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sounds like 'shot in the dark' way to find a good riding position, on top of spending a bunch of Dinars... without getting any real result.
Best is to truly define a good working saddle position - which might include getting a post allowing a good range for saddle setback.
saddle height and then saddle setback - there's plenty of info on that available - and too many opinions... LOL!
'weight' on hands comes from a number of different sources.
Once a good saddle position for your pedaling is determined, then adjust reach and stack.
Adjustable stems are quite inexpensive, and a valuable tool for helping define stack. Get a 10 or 11 cm adjustable with good range of adjustment and use in place of the current stem.
Bend your elbows and drop you shoulders some, go ride - the adjustable stem will give you a feel for variance of stack and reach. Not the absolute best way to test reach and stack - but quick, easy and a good approx.
Bend the elbows AND DROP the shoulders away/down from the ears.
Ride on
Yuri
EDIT:

Good road cycling posture - cycling is a lifetime of learning, adjusting and improving - as are most things in living...

Last edited by cyclezen; 05-05-22 at 09:57 AM.
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Old 05-05-22, 03:59 PM
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Originally Posted by TakingMyTime View Post
I might need some learnin' here but I would have thought that with the greater stack, the longer headtube and the reach being about the same that the Ribble would have me in a much more upright positi8on. I will take your advice and check these dimensions again the Roubaix and see if I can wrap my head around this a little more.
562 mm is still a relatively low stack height for an endurance bike of that size. Most are around 600 mm in a large frame. The reach is also pretty long for endurance geo. In fact it doesn't look like a contemporary endurance fit at all! But relative to your Trek it is more upright for sure.
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Old 05-05-22, 07:26 PM
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I appreciate all the input. I think I'll be checking out some other geometries to see how they compare to the Ribble. I agree with all the people who said I should ride it first. I have about 4 bikes on my short list but none of them are in stock near me so that I could go and take one for a test ride. That's why I'm trying to get a little knowledgeable and possibly have to purchase something sight unseen.
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Old 05-08-22, 07:15 AM
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I did a little more research and from the suggestions and sizing tips I've received it does appear that many of the bikes I was looking at, although touted as being "Endurance" geometries, really weren't. It appears that a Trek Domane may be more inline with what I'm looking for and there is also a better chance of finding someone within 50 miles that might actually have one in stock so I can take an actual test ride.

Again, the hardest part about choosing a new bike is that in the past I would have had 5-10 test rides under my belt before deciding. Those test rides would have eliminated probably 2/3rds of the bikes I'm looking at and I could have saved myself a lot of time. In the past my local Trek LBS would have been flooded with every model imaginable. Now it's a half day of surfing the Web and then a 50 miles drive just to see it. Sorry, I'm just complaining but it would have been a lot easier 3 years ago.
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Old 05-14-22, 11:59 AM
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https://bikeinsights.com/

use this. this website should be pinned

But, you have to already somewhat of an idea what you already ride.
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