Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fitting Your Bike
Reload this Page >

Difficulty in choosing stem length!

Notices
Fitting Your Bike Are you confused about how you should fit a bike to your particular body dimensions? Have you been reading, found the terms Merxx or French Fit, and donít know what you need? Every style of riding is different- in how you fit the bike to you, and the sizing of the bike itself. Itís more than just measuring your height, reach and inseam. With the help of Bike Fitting, youíll be able to find the right fit for your frame size, style of riding, and your particular dimensions. Here yaí goÖ..the location for everything fit related.

Difficulty in choosing stem length!

Old 07-23-22, 06:53 AM
  #1  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
stormy_ll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: uk
Posts: 91

Bikes: Mercian, Claud Butler, Harry Quinn, BTwin, Johnny Berry

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Difficulty in choosing stem length!

Hello everybody,

I have bought this new (to me) Cube Attain Pro frame recently for building up my endurance/longer distance cycling and club rides with a bit more relaxed geometry. Therefore, the aim is to have comfort whilst maintaining a little bit of a performance stance.

The issue is that im struggling to choose the correct stem length - I am 5ft 10 on the dot and have a cycling inseam of 32Ē - the frame size is a 56.

The first two pictures show a 100mm stem and the second two pictures show a 90mm stem. I think from watching footage back I need to work on my posture/keeping a straight back, especially with the shorter stem which produces a more round shape when I get lazy. I am however a little confused because it seems like a lot of people I see out riding are quite upright compared to how I look in these pictures.



I am only a student so cannot afford a professional fitting at this time so any advice as to my reach/posture from anybody here would be greatly appreciated! Thanks



stormy_ll is offline  
Old 07-23-22, 05:22 PM
  #2  
I'm good to go!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 15,215

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 51 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6321 Post(s)
Liked 4,914 Times in 3,385 Posts
Doesn't look too bad to me in any picture. Are you having an issue? Running the Cube sizing calculator it says you are in between a 53 and a 56 cm frame. Did you by chance try the 53 cm?

I was the same way on my Tarmac. I went with the 56 which was actually the smaller suggested size, but am wondering what the 54 would have been like. Wish I'd tried that small a frame.

I've shortened my stem from 100 mm to 70 mm. Worth it to be able to get more bend in elbows. What made it more worth it was to go to 38 cm wide bars from the 42 cm that came on it. That combination of narrow bars and short stem seemed to dial in the handling of the bike to make it responsive to avoid last minute road hazards and improved the feel going down fast twisty turns. Whether any of that actually helped make me feel more comfortable is debatable. Probably comes down to whether I'm doing a long ride or a short ride.

You have flat pedal on that bike or are they clipless? Not so certain that your seat might not be a tad low. But that depends on if that is the real foot angle that you keep for most of your riding. Though when I'm on a trainer I tend to lower my seat from what I do on the road. But I don't use a trainer much and when I do, it's just to keep my cadence. So I'm sitting pretty upright and nothing like the position I have on the open road.

There'll be a few others along that actually know more about what you ask. But again, if you aren't having issues for the riding you do, it's hard to really critique you.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 07-23-22, 06:10 PM
  #3  
OM boy
 
cyclezen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Goleta CA
Posts: 4,430

Bikes: a bunch

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 545 Post(s)
Liked 687 Times in 461 Posts
Originally Posted by stormy_ll
Hello everybody,

I have bought this new (to me) Cube Attain Pro frame recently for building up my endurance/longer distance cycling and club rides with a bit more relaxed geometry. Therefore, the aim is to have comfort whilst maintaining a little bit of a performance stance.
The issue is that im struggling to choose the correct stem length - I am 5ft 10 on the dot and have a cycling inseam of 32Ē - the frame size is a 56.
The first two pictures show a 100mm stem and the second two pictures show a 90mm stem. I think from watching footage back I need to work on my posture/keeping a straight back, especially with the shorter stem which produces a more round shape when I get lazy. I am however a little confused because it seems like a lot of people I see out riding are quite upright compared to how I look in these pictures.
I am only a student so cannot afford a professional fitting at this time so any advice as to my reach/posture from anybody here would be greatly appreciated! Thanks


Congrats on your very nice new bike!
So my comments are based on your comments and your obvious youthful state.
I would say, don;t compare yourself to everyone you see. They all have their own considerations...
Overall, if how you have the bike setup for you, works on your rides, then you have your answer. Some extended riding time will bring out any issues, which you can then think about and research.
I don;t see any issues with sizing, saddle extension or bar positioning.
Are the stems 'loaners', or do you own both?
If you own both, try one for an extended period (month - 20+ rides) and you can swap to the other for same period.
I've 'kept' only one of your photos, because it's the one most like real riding - you have your sight, head and eyes, looking down the road - NOT down to the road, 1 m in front of your wheel...
IN the pic, you're in a nice, relaxed posture, appropriate for a rider with good flexibility, you're not 'straight arming' the bars (but could use a hair more elbow bend).and shoulders are relaxed down, not up near the ears. If you ride this way, Kudos.
I would 'prefer' the 10. Why?
If you bring your hands back to the 'bend' or Tops' of the bar, you'll be quite upright - no need to be more so...
If you, at some time, decide to get more 'aero' and bend the elbows more, your elbows will stay 'forward' of your shoulders, which means more bar stabilization and also more power. Preferred is to never have the elbows exactly perpendicular to the shoulders, and certainly not behind.
Which ever you go with, keep both - you'll never know how your cycling changes, and down the road you might find the other more appropriate.
Don;t make decisions on what you see others using - you have no idea of what all they are wrestling with.
Neither need be permanent.
That said, I'd say leave the 10 on for now... ride a bunch... evaluate.
Saddle height/setback - your sig says you've been on BF for a while, and likely been riding for that time - you should have a decent handle on saddle height and setback - my guess...
Enjoy the new 'Wheels' !
Ride On
Yuri
cyclezen is offline  
Old 07-23-22, 07:12 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 12,968

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 129 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4854 Post(s)
Liked 3,993 Times in 2,592 Posts
My first comment is that your seat looks high. In the first photo, your knee bend is about as straight as I'd ever like to see and you have your foot pointed down. Maybe OK if toes down is how you ride all the time. I mention this because your ideal stem will always be dependent on your seat position. (The seat height guide I and others use is to sit on the bike on a trainer or leaning against a wall and rotate one pedal all the way down. Now I place my barefoot heel on the pedal spindle. Perfect seat height is when I can either straighten my leg or bend my knee a little and not rock my hips at all as I do it. (Some like a slightly higher seat and do the same test with heel-less cycling shoes or slippers. Once you've found what footwear works, keep it!

You may find leaning forward and reaching further easier with a lower seat and more knee bend. This will have rewards both in comfort and your legs will thank you for being more aero on that long upwind day,

Select a stem that feels right with all or perhaps all but one spacer under the stem. Because, if you ride enough, you'll get more comfortable and want more reach. Well, removing 1 cm of spacers is almost exactly the reach addition of 2 cm more (horizontal -17 degree) stem. (Neat little college budget trick as well as the way to make a whole bunch of stems work in a pinch.)

Another point: Your elbows. From these photos it is hard to tell how much you have them bent. More is always better! (Within reason.) Too straight and bad things happen when you hit the pothole you didn't see. (Yes, little excuse for not seeing it riding solo but in races, in pacelines, in dense traffic, that pothole might be only 3' away before it's even in sight. Riding solo? Daydreaming is one of the perks!)

Shortly after college, I joined the racing club of Boston. The racers there with a lot of experience quickly told me to lower my seat! Then in rides, stressed elbows bent and rotated out so all contact with other riders happened on those non-rigid arms and kept my handlebars free from hooking other rider's hands, bars or legs.
79pmooney is offline  
Old 07-24-22, 03:37 AM
  #5  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
stormy_ll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: uk
Posts: 91

Bikes: Mercian, Claud Butler, Harry Quinn, BTwin, Johnny Berry

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01
Doesn't look too bad to me in any picture. Are you having an issue? Running the Cube sizing calculator it says you are in between a 53 and a 56 cm frame. Did you by chance try the 53 cm?

I was the same way on my Tarmac. I went with the 56 which was actually the smaller suggested size, but am wondering what the 54 would have been like. Wish I'd tried that small a frame.

I've shortened my stem from 100 mm to 70 mm. Worth it to be able to get more bend in elbows. What made it more worth it was to go to 38 cm wide bars from the 42 cm that came on it. That combination of narrow bars and short stem seemed to dial in the handling of the bike to make it responsive to avoid last minute road hazards and improved the feel going down fast twisty turns. Whether any of that actually helped make me feel more comfortable is debatable. Probably comes down to whether I'm doing a long ride or a short ride.

You have flat pedal on that bike or are they clipless? Not so certain that your seat might not be a tad low. But that depends on if that is the real foot angle that you keep for most of your riding. Though when I'm on a trainer I tend to lower my seat from what I do on the road. But I don't use a trainer much and when I do, it's just to keep my cadence. So I'm sitting pretty upright and nothing like the position I have on the open road.

There'll be a few others along that actually know more about what you ask. But again, if you aren't having issues for the riding you do, it's hard to really critique you.
Your first comment makes me worriedÖ! I used to ride a 57cm triban 3 (my first more modern road bike), and have come from a bunch of steel bikes that were obviously fitted quite large. I didnít try a smaller size as I came across this one and assumed it would be correct/scared a 54 would be too small/too big of a jump from what Iím used to. I took it for a small test ride but having never been on a modern 54cm so I donít have much to compare it to. Steel 54cm bikes do feel quite small for me though but the geometry is of course different. The original owner had a 70cm stem on it originally and was 5ft 8-9. I think in the future I also would like to try a 54cm at some point as well but it is what it is I suppose, to make that decision I think Iíd really need to try one for a decent amount of time.

I have look keo classic pedals on this bike, but I think my saddle might be slightly high compared to average - my knees feel better like that for some reason but Iíll put it down a bit and see how I get on.

I donít have any real issues as such but when I reach the 50 miles/few hours in the saddle mark I get a little lower back pains which again I think may be due to posture. I did a little searching and found that a common solution seemed to be to increase reach a little, hence the trial increase from 90 to 100mm on the stem. I just canít tell if it makes me look rather stretched out as a result. The only other thing I can think of would be saddle fore/aft position but I seem to have the feedback from here and a free online site that it is okay. It also usually feels okay up to that point.
stormy_ll is offline  
Old 07-24-22, 03:55 AM
  #6  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
stormy_ll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: uk
Posts: 91

Bikes: Mercian, Claud Butler, Harry Quinn, BTwin, Johnny Berry

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by cyclezen
Congrats on your very nice new bike!
So my comments are based on your comments and your obvious youthful state.
I would say, don;t compare yourself to everyone you see. They all have their own considerations...
Overall, if how you have the bike setup for you, works on your rides, then you have your answer. Some extended riding time will bring out any issues, which you can then think about and research.
I don;t see any issues with sizing, saddle extension or bar positioning.
Are the stems 'loaners', or do you own both?
If you own both, try one for an extended period (month - 20+ rides) and you can swap to the other for same period.
I've 'kept' only one of your photos, because it's the one most like real riding - you have your sight, head and eyes, looking down the road - NOT down to the road, 1 m in front of your wheel...
IN the pic, you're in a nice, relaxed posture, appropriate for a rider with good flexibility, you're not 'straight arming' the bars (but could use a hair more elbow bend).and shoulders are relaxed down, not up near the ears. If you ride this way, Kudos.
I would 'prefer' the 10. Why?
If you bring your hands back to the 'bend' or Tops' of the bar, you'll be quite upright - no need to be more so...
If you, at some time, decide to get more 'aero' and bend the elbows more, your elbows will stay 'forward' of your shoulders, which means more bar stabilization and also more power. Preferred is to never have the elbows exactly perpendicular to the shoulders, and certainly not behind.
Which ever you go with, keep both - you'll never know how your cycling changes, and down the road you might find the other more appropriate.
Don;t make decisions on what you see others using - you have no idea of what all they are wrestling with.
Neither need be permanent.
That said, I'd say leave the 10 on for now... ride a bunch... evaluate.
Saddle height/setback - your sig says you've been on BF for a while, and likely been riding for that time - you should have a decent handle on saddle height and setback - my guess...
Enjoy the new 'Wheels' !
Ride On
Yuri
Thank you very much Yuri!
The main curiosity for increasing stem length is that I notice a bit of lower back pain after 3-4 hours and I think it may be due to poor posture. After a bit of research I came to the conclusion that it may be best to increase reach a little and hopefully it should put more weight on the saddle. As a result however, I canít tell if I look a bit too stretched out/arms not bent enough for optimal control/comfort. Your comments are reassuring though so Iíll work on my core some more and make active effort to bend my arms more.

All these stems are mine, I think I have a 70 (might be an 80), 90, 100 and 110. The only annoying thing is that the steerer is slightly too long for this 100mm (manufacturer variation?) so I have to steal a spacer from a different bike to compress it all properly.

Iíll see if I have another one that fits on the bike correctly and keep it on for a while, as you say there is no harm in extended trials
stormy_ll is offline  
Old 07-24-22, 06:13 AM
  #7  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
stormy_ll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: uk
Posts: 91

Bikes: Mercian, Claud Butler, Harry Quinn, BTwin, Johnny Berry

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by 79pmooney
My first comment is that your seat looks high. In the first photo, your knee bend is about as straight as I'd ever like to see and you have your foot pointed down. Maybe OK if toes down is how you ride all the time. I mention this because your ideal stem will always be dependent on your seat position. (The seat height guide I and others use is to sit on the bike on a trainer or leaning against a wall and rotate one pedal all the way down. Now I place my barefoot heel on the pedal spindle. Perfect seat height is when I can either straighten my leg or bend my knee a little and not rock my hips at all as I do it. (Some like a slightly higher seat and do the same test with heel-less cycling shoes or slippers. Once you've found what footwear works, keep it!

You may find leaning forward and reaching further easier with a lower seat and more knee bend. This will have rewards both in comfort and your legs will thank you for being more aero on that long upwind day,

Select a stem that feels right with all or perhaps all but one spacer under the stem. Because, if you ride enough, you'll get more comfortable and want more reach. Well, removing 1 cm of spacers is almost exactly the reach addition of 2 cm more (horizontal -17 degree) stem. (Neat little college budget trick as well as the way to make a whole bunch of stems work in a pinch.)

Another point: Your elbows. From these photos it is hard to tell how much you have them bent. More is always better! (Within reason.) Too straight and bad things happen when you hit the pothole you didn't see. (Yes, little excuse for not seeing it riding solo but in races, in pacelines, in dense traffic, that pothole might be only 3' away before it's even in sight. Riding solo? Daydreaming is one of the perks!)

Shortly after college, I joined the racing club of Boston. The racers there with a lot of experience quickly told me to lower my seat! Then in rides, stressed elbows bent and rotated out so all contact with other riders happened on those non-rigid arms and kept my handlebars free from hooking other rider's hands, bars or legs.
Thank you for the detailed response

I tend to like my saddle height slightly high as you say! I do the extended leg with shoes on rather than without and find this works for my knees. Too low and they get pain on the medial side rather quickly. I shall try lowering it a mm or two but doubt Iíll stray that far since Iíve used this pedal/shoe/height combo for a while now on a different bike and it seems to have worked well. It is an interesting prospect though and if it makes things a bit better then why not
Toes down may be a result of my cleat position which I kind of set centrally and left it to be but itís never given me any issues so I assume itís fine to leave as is. That stuff is all a bit of black magic to me I canít also promise it wasnít a result of thinking too hard since I was cycling on videoÖ

As for spacers I think there is one 5mm one but I am trying thinking of removing it, only issue as I said is that the steerer tube is a little long for the 100mm stem so Iíll have to figure that out. Iíll keep that one on there, take the spacer below out and make sure to keep good arms. Thank you for your comments

Last edited by stormy_ll; 07-24-22 at 06:18 AM.
stormy_ll is offline  
Old 07-24-22, 06:26 AM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Valley Forge: Birthplace of Freedom
Posts: 1,301

Bikes: Novara Safari, CAAD9, WABI Classic, WABI Thunder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 366 Post(s)
Liked 459 Times in 240 Posts
Take a long ride or two with each and use the one which is more comfortable.
__________________
Be watchful, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong. Let all that you do be done in love.
stevel610 is offline  
Old 07-24-22, 09:55 AM
  #9  
I'm good to go!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 15,215

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 51 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6321 Post(s)
Liked 4,914 Times in 3,385 Posts
Originally Posted by stormy_ll
Your first comment makes me worried…! I used to ride a 57cm triban 3 (my first more modern road bike), and have come from a bunch of steel bikes that were obviously fitted quite large.
Well for one thing, don't ever imagine a size given for one model of bike as being the size you need for another model of bike. If I go through the sizing recommendations for different models of bike on Specialized's site, I get different recommendations for different models. And it's been like that ever since the vintage days and before. Overwhelmingly though, people want something simple to grab on to and wrongly they still hold on to one size as being their size for any bike. Absolutely not true.... though many bikes are in fact close enough for you to get by and not notice since many people can get by on a range of sizes.

I sort of wonder if you would do better on a lower stack bike. Or at least straighten you back some and roll your pelvis forward. That might get you looking at saddle tilt or even a new saddle with proper cutout or profile.

I too grew up with way oversize frames for my 180 cm height (5' - 11"). I spent over 35 years on a 64 cm frame that I rode comfortably. But since turning 50 I've been steadily sizing down the frames and finding the smaller frames fit better and more fun since they are sportier handling and not riding like a big luxury sedan on the open road.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 07-24-22, 11:50 AM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
phughes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,132
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1060 Post(s)
Liked 1,319 Times in 759 Posts
Originally Posted by stormy_ll
Hello everybody,

I have bought this new (to me) Cube Attain Pro frame recently for building up my endurance/longer distance cycling and club rides with a bit more relaxed geometry. Therefore, the aim is to have comfort whilst maintaining a little bit of a performance stance.

The issue is that im struggling to choose the correct stem length - I am 5ft 10 on the dot and have a cycling inseam of 32Ē - the frame size is a 56.

The first two pictures show a 100mm stem and the second two pictures show a 90mm stem. I think from watching footage back I need to work on my posture/keeping a straight back, especially with the shorter stem which produces a more round shape when I get lazy. I am however a little confused because it seems like a lot of people I see out riding are quite upright compared to how I look in these pictures.



I am only a student so cannot afford a professional fitting at this time so any advice as to my reach/posture from anybody here would be greatly appreciated! Thanks



It is difficult to truly determine this with a static picture, but you look more relaxed with the 90mm stem, though neither look especially bad. Also, your seat is too high. You look to have an extreme toe down position, which can make you favor one side or the other, dropping to one side as you ride, causing issues with your hips and back. It can also give you issues with your achilles tendon, not to mention perineum pain.
phughes is offline  
Likes For phughes:
Old 07-24-22, 03:46 PM
  #11  
OM boy
 
cyclezen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Goleta CA
Posts: 4,430

Bikes: a bunch

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 545 Post(s)
Liked 687 Times in 461 Posts
Originally Posted by stormy_ll
Thank you very much Yuri!
The main curiosity for increasing stem length is that I notice a bit of lower back pain after 3-4 hours and I think it may be due to poor posture. After a bit of research I came to the conclusion that it may be best to increase reach a little and hopefully it should put more weight on the saddle. As a result however, I canít tell if I look a bit too stretched out/arms not bent enough for optimal control/comfort. Your comments are reassuring though so Iíll work on my core some more and make active effort to bend my arms more.

All these stems are mine, I think I have a 70 (might be an 80), 90, 100 and 110. The only annoying thing is that the steerer is slightly too long for this 100mm (manufacturer variation?) so I have to steal a spacer from a different bike to compress it all properly.

Iíll see if I have another one that fits on the bike correctly and keep it on for a while, as you say there is no harm in extended trials
One cm of stem length is going to have much effect on reach. If the slightly longer reach feels better, that's good. Bending the elbows a bit, also isn;t going to affect reach; it's just a matter of developing the habit. Your hand position on the hoods is good, because you have the meat of the palm on the bar, rather than pressuring the ulnar channel - less chance of hand pain/hands falling asleep.
A recent other thread brought up a great article on position/posture as relates to 'aero' advantage, don't remember who posted it or I would note the contribution, but I bookmarked for future reference : UCI Banned Road Position Aerodynamics - which isn't really the main take-away - if the numbers are reasonably close to reality, then it certainly tells a bunch about posture/position.
Quite some years back I decide the 'aero hoods' position felt as good/better than being on the 'drops' (flats of drops). So I mostly never uses the drops/flats, mostly use elbow bend to get aero, and only use the 'hooks' (lower bar bend below the levers) for tech downhill and sprinting... Another reason to get comfortable in various elbow bend positions.
My opinion about frame size - the attain certainly seems 'compact' enough for you. I don;t envision any advantage to going smaller.
Going to a 53 from the 56 reduces Effective TT from 560 to 537 - a very sizable (and very short) change. You could get a 'feel' for that by using your 70mm stem for a bit...
Then there's stack, and ST angle affecting the saddle placement. We're not tawkin Gravel Bike here, this is a road bike.
Per your 1st comments, you bought the Attain for the 'relaxed' geometry. The 56 is already quite 'relaxed'. But I can't see this being anything but 'snappy' and nicely quick handling.
Don't do 'Old Man' things, that will happen by itself... in time. LOL!
Ride On
Yuri
cyclezen is offline  
Old 07-25-22, 04:46 AM
  #12  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2022
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by stormy_ll
Hello everybody,

I have bought this new (to me) Cube Attain Pro frame recently for building up my endurance/longer distance cycling and club rides with a bit more relaxed geometry. Therefore, the aim is to have comfort whilst maintaining a little bit of a performance stance.

The issue is that im struggling to choose the correct stem length - I am 5ft 10 on the dot and have a cycling inseam of 32Ē - the frame size is a 56.

The first two pictures show a 100mm stem and the second two pictures show a 90mm stem. I think from watching footage back I need to work on my posture/keeping a straight back, especially with the shorter stem which produces a more round shape when I get lazy. I am however a little confused because it seems like a lot of people I see out riding are quite upright compared to how I look in these pictures.
The 100 mm position looks good. You look a bit cramped in the 90 mm photos. Personally I think for your age you can even go longer to a 110 or even more maybe.

That said, maybe you can try playing around with the rotation of your handlebar a bit.

Currently the flat part of the drops seem to be too angled to my eye. I'd set them up more parallel to the ground. In this position the hands always feel like they're about to slip off, and if the reach to the levers is off, then in the drops you would find it difficult covering the brakes confidently in a descent.
ebonho is offline  
Old 07-31-22, 02:07 PM
  #13  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
stormy_ll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: uk
Posts: 91

Bikes: Mercian, Claud Butler, Harry Quinn, BTwin, Johnny Berry

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by phughes
It is difficult to truly determine this with a static picture, but you look more relaxed with the 90mm stem, though neither look especially bad. Also, your seat is too high. You look to have an extreme toe down position, which can make you favor one side or the other, dropping to one side as you ride, causing issues with your hips and back. It can also give you issues with your achilles tendon, not to mention perineum pain.
Hello, I have tried moving down the saddle height a little to be more like what I think would be a ďnormal saddle heightĒ to the people who have stated my saddle looks a bit high. I went for a quick spin today (about 20 miles) and experienced quad soreness after coming back - this is not something I think I have ever experienced.

Should I stick with it considering there has been a change to the saddle height? Throughout the ride I moved it around 7mm lower than where it was before. It is worrying me a bit that I am starting to have new pains as I am planning to join a 100m ride in early sept. Could it make sense that compensation from my lower leg had reduced the need for quad strengthening in the past?

This has been accompanied with keeping the 100mm stem and moving the cleats back about 2mm.

Thanks a lot
stormy_ll is offline  
Old 07-31-22, 02:18 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
phughes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,132
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1060 Post(s)
Liked 1,319 Times in 759 Posts
Originally Posted by stormy_ll
Hello, I have tried moving down the saddle height a little to be more like what I think would be a ďnormal saddle heightĒ to the people who have stated my saddle looks a bit high. I went for a quick spin today (about 20 miles) and experienced quad soreness after coming back - this is not something I think I have ever experienced.

Should I stick with it considering there has been a change to the saddle height? Throughout the ride I moved it around 7mm lower than where it was before. It is worrying me a bit that I am starting to have new pains as I am planning to join a 100m ride in early sept. Could it make sense that compensation from my lower leg had reduced the need for quad strengthening in the past?

This has been accompanied with keeping the 100mm stem and moving the cleats back about 2mm.

Thanks a lot
Any change in fit will take a while for your body to adjust to. For seat height look up Steve Hogg Seat Height How Hard Can it Be? I am traveling and am using my phone or I'd post the link. I don't have time at the moment.
phughes is offline  
Old 07-31-22, 04:04 PM
  #15  
OM boy
 
cyclezen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Goleta CA
Posts: 4,430

Bikes: a bunch

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 545 Post(s)
Liked 687 Times in 461 Posts
Originally Posted by stormy_ll
Hello, I have tried moving down the saddle height a little to be more like what I think would be a “normal saddle height” to the people who have stated my saddle looks a bit high. I went for a quick spin today (about 20 miles) and experienced quad soreness after coming back - this is not something I think I have ever experienced.
Should I stick with it considering there has been a change to the saddle height? Throughout the ride I moved it around 7mm lower than where it was before. It is worrying me a bit that I am starting to have new pains as I am planning to join a 100m ride in early sept. Could it make sense that compensation from my lower leg had reduced the need for quad strengthening in the past?
This has been accompanied with keeping the 100mm stem and moving the cleats back about 2mm.
Thanks a lot
Not surprised. That's a significant change in saddle position. It not only affects the leg extension (height), but also moves you/your pelvic area/hips forward some.
This does change how and when muscle group engagement happens. If it's different enough, it will affect how your muscles react.
Your pics are NOT definitive on your leg extension, 2 vary greatly when cranks are full vertical, one doesn't even apply. SO I wouldn;t even guess on whether a change might be a plus.
Some riders like a 'lower' extension, so do great a little higher... How you do, none of us can know.
IF you haven't had any issues before, especially as relates to what your longer distance riding performance has been, why screw with it now?
Your legs might adapt to the new position, in a month, and they might not... If you believe your old position would get you through the upcoming 100 (miles?) ... make a change now?
You could - massage your quads and get the soreness out, then raise the saddle 1/2 up (3-4 mm) and try again...See how that feels...
or you can go back to your original height, get thru your planned ride and then some time in the future, make smaller adjustments and ride for a longer period before making other/additional changes.
I usually recommend changes no more than 3 -4 mm on saddle moves, height and setback. Big changes for riders who ride regularly/often can prove problematic.
Unless you're gaining something or fixing something, why make a change ?
As for us Online Bike Philosophers, we earn what we get paid... LOL!
Ride On
Yuri

Last edited by cyclezen; 07-31-22 at 04:14 PM.
cyclezen is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.