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Putting leg down at light

Old 09-14-22, 10:22 PM
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Wallonthefloor
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Putting leg down at light

I always put my right leg down when I stop. I am now noticing knee pain when walking up stairs after my bike ride. I think Im over extending my leg a bit when putting my foot down.. should I just use my other leg sometimes or stand off the saddle?
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Old 09-15-22, 12:32 PM
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Maybe just lean the bike more so you don't have to keep your leg overextended at the stop. Or simply get off the saddle. However more often than not, I'll lean the bike and stand on my left foot at stops. Only when I expect it to be a stop for a long traffic light do I get off the saddle and use both feet.

But if your knee is bothering you, you need to do something. Don't just assume it's the leg down at stops. Might be several other things.
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Old 09-16-22, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Maybe just lean the bike more so you don't have to keep your leg overextended at the stop. Or simply get off the saddle. However more often than not, I'll lean the bike and stand on my left foot at stops. Only when I expect it to be a stop for a long traffic light do I get off the saddle and use both feet.

But if your knee is bothering you, you need to do something. Don't just assume it's the leg down at stops. Might be several other things.
I'm trying to think of the origination of this knee pain and that is one of the factors. It might have started when I got my new used GT mountain bike at first I rode it a few miles test riding and the seat was a bit too low and then I stood and its chain shifted improperly as I was getting going and I landed on my feet awkwardly to save myself from planting. So since this just came to mind I think the tumble off the saddle and landing on my feet hard maybe twisting a bit has injured my knee. Should I still keep riding properly? The bike has since been fixed up by the shop it had a really bent derailleur hanger.
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Old 09-16-22, 12:38 PM
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With pain you sort of have to judge for yourself if it's something you can ride through while it takes care of itself or not. But if intense pain and especially if any swelling around the knee, then I would be taking a few days off the bike for it to get better.

If you can make adjustments that alleviate that pain, then I'd suppose it's okay. But if you are moving out of the proper fit position of things like saddle height, then you might eventually have some other issues. But temporarily for a week or so till your pain goes away might be okay.

Since this is a new to you bike, is the q-factor (distance between the crank arm planes) different from what you rode before. Or is the length of the cranks significantly different than the bike prior. As well, are you using cleats? If so, then possibly your cleat angles need to be adjusted so your knee joint moves without binding or twisting as your go from the bottom pedal stroke to the top pedal stroke.
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Old 09-16-22, 01:07 PM
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It feels great to ride with the same measured seat height as to my other bikes. Cranks are the same length. Just that stumble off the moving bike hurt me and its painful to climb on my singlespeed and walking up stairs. I am going to ride my e bike and use the motor as much as possible.
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Old 09-16-22, 10:44 PM
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This seems to me to be a rehab issue. For every injury, there's a way to rehab it. The trick is to figure out what that is. My first instinct would be to try walking, just plain walking. We are built to walk. Try around the block, then gradually longer up to say 3 miles. Depending on the injury, this might be a little uncomfortable to start with, but might loosen up and feel fine after maybe 1/2 mile - or not. Sometimes I'll do deep unweighted squats to loosen up and strengthen knee tissues. Play around with various things.
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Old 09-19-22, 07:05 AM
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Agree with Carbonfiberboy, except for the squats. I have to listen to my body, here. I do a deep squat when I get down to do a saddle measurement, with some discomfort upon standing back up. It's one of the ways I discover I may have an injury. It abates if I only do partial squats until the knee feels stronger, maybe ľ, then Ĺ, then ĺ. One of the therapies (according to Dr. Road Fan) is walking, and another is gentle pedaling at medium cadence and low effort, and I also try to think about linear/vertical knee tracking, all very gentle. Also necessary is no leg hyperextension or foot pressing the pedal at BDC - that means the saddle is too low. I think the benefit here is something related to knee self-lubrication.

The 2 and 3 mile walks also work and relax my hip ball joints.
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Old 09-19-22, 07:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Wallonthefloor View Post
I always put my right leg down when I stop. I am now noticing knee pain when walking up stairs after my bike ride. I think Im over extending my leg a bit when putting my foot down.. should I just use my other leg sometimes or stand off the saddle?
I cycle a lot in the City and am constantly stopping at relights. I run clipless SPD pedals so what I do is unclip left foot , stop, get off saddle as I am putting left foot down..I also slightly lean the bike for a comfortable unclipped leg on the ground position

If your bike is properly fitted then you should not be able to reach the ground with either foot while still seated in the saddle. When seated in the saddle and the crank in the 6 o'clock position you should only have a very slight bend at the knee. Based on that, fully extending your leg when unclipped should not allow stable footing on the grounds while still in the saddle unless you are leaning the bike at an odd angle thus hyper-extending your leg.

Get your fit checked at a bike shop. My .02

Good luck!
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Old 09-19-22, 08:37 AM
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Originally Posted by raqball View Post
...
If your bike is properly fitted then you should not be able to reach the ground with either foot while still seated in the saddle. ...
Correct. Putting your foot down while still in the saddle is not a thing. You shouldn't be able to do it, nor should it be attempted. The exceptions would be a "pedal forward" bicycle that's made for that, or I guess a recumbent. On a normal bike, if you're stopped, you are out of the saddle, period. If you can put your foot down while stopped, your saddle is too low and that alone can cause knee pain.
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Old 09-19-22, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Jeff Neese View Post
Correct. Putting your foot down while still in the saddle is not a thing. You shouldn't be able to do it, nor should it be attempted. The exceptions would be a "pedal forward" bicycle that's made for that, or I guess a recumbent. On a normal bike, if you're stopped, you are out of the saddle, period. If you can put your foot down while stopped, your saddle is too low and that alone can cause knee pain.
Did you fellas mean to say, "...foot all the way down..."? Because I've always managed to do it tippy-toe.
In my estimation, anyway, performing this alone would not create a knee problem. Sounds like it stems from something else.
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Old 09-19-22, 05:44 PM
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Originally Posted by roadcrankr View Post
Did you fellas mean to say, "...foot all the way down..."? Because I've always managed to do it tippy-toe.
In my estimation, anyway, performing this alone would not create a knee problem. Sounds like it stems from something else.
The knee problem may indeed stem from something else, and just be revealing itself when he does what he's doing. That doesn't change that there's a right way and a wrong way to stop and start on a bicycle, and reaching down with your tippy-toe to stabilize yourself while stopped is not the right way. There are a lots of broken arms and collarbones, in people's own driveway. There are some excellent videos on Youtube on how to start, stop, dismount, and restart again. It's worth drilling. If you can't do a track stand, you better learn the right way to stop and restart.
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Old 09-19-22, 05:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Jeff Neese View Post
The knee problem may indeed stem from something else, and just be revealing itself when he does what he's doing. That doesn't change that there's a right way and a wrong way to stop and start on a bicycle, and reaching down with your tippy-toe to stabilize yourself while stopped is not the right way. There are a lots of broken arms and collarbones, in people's own driveway. There are some excellent videos on Youtube on how to start, stop, dismount, and restart again. It's worth drilling. If you can't do a track stand, you better learn the right way to stop and restart.
Maybe...except you two stated earlier in your comments that a rider could not touch the ground with the front part of their foot.
Tippy-toe might be an exaggeration. The inability to do this suggests one's saddle is too high.
Anyway, no need to admonish me. I typically trackstand at stops. Or lean over with the ball of my foot planted. Or entirely off my saddle.
For upwards of fifty years, I might add. So perhaps you can address your seat height issue or something else that causes you to klutz out.
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Old 09-19-22, 07:55 PM
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Originally Posted by roadcrankr View Post
Maybe...except you two stated earlier in your comments that a rider could not touch the ground with the front part of their foot.
I said nothing of the sort. Please stop making things up because your tippy-toe thing is absurd and a bad idea to pass along as advise to someone who is already experiencing issues...

Here is what I actually said:

extending your leg when unclipped should not allow stable footing on the grounds while still in the saddle unless you are leaning the bike at an odd angle thus hyper-extending your leg.

Now let me guess... Your
tippy-toe nonsense qualifies as stable footing in your mind right?
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Old 09-19-22, 08:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Jeff Neese View Post
Correct. Putting your foot down while still in the saddle is not a thing. You shouldn't be able to do it, nor should it be attempted. The exceptions would be a "pedal forward" bicycle that's made for that, or I guess a recumbent. On a normal bike, if you're stopped, you are out of the saddle, period. If you can put your foot down while stopped, your saddle is too low and that alone can cause knee pain.
Originally Posted by raqball View Post
I said nothing of the sort. Please stop making things up because your tippy-toe thing is absurd and a bad idea to pass along as advise to someone who is already experiencing issues...

Here is what I actually said:


Now let me guess... Your tippy-toe nonsense qualifies as stable footing in your mind right?
I never gave any advice. In fact, you guys did by saying a rider could not touch the ground while seated.
The excerpt from your post, that Jeff Neese confirmed: "If your bike is properly fitted then you should not be able to reach the ground with either foot while still seated in the saddle." This advice suggests and infers the OP should raise his saddle height.
I never recommended anybody to perform this maneuver, but I have done it for fifty years without any issues.
Perhaps you should re-read your narrative in the morning with a clear mind.
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Old 09-19-22, 08:38 PM
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Originally Posted by roadcrankr View Post
Perhaps you should re-read your narrative in the morning with a clear mind.
Or.... Perhaps you should stop giving out terrible advise / info to the OP who is already experiencing issues..

Of course you can contort your body and lean the bike to make it happen. Just because you can does not mean you should. Nevermind someone who is already having issues.

If you want to balance on your tippy-toes then have at it I guess.. If your bike is properly fitted then you simply should not be able to get solid footing when seated in the saddle..

Argue onwards I guess, to the block list with you..
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Old 09-20-22, 04:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Wallonthefloor View Post
I always put my right leg down when I stop. I am now noticing knee pain when walking up stairs after my bike ride. I think Im over extending my leg a bit when putting my foot down.. should I just use my other leg sometimes or stand off the saddle?
Hi, there. I just wanted to go to the source in this thread to make sure you did not misunderstand what I wrote.
My aim was less about giving advice and more about ensuring you did not raise your saddle too high.
A couple other posters accused me of giving faulty advice. Or "advise" as one said a couple times. LOL
Anyway, they got a little twisted and I certainly did not wish you to fall into that category.
Incidentally, during my ride today, I found myself unclipping from either pedal and getting both my toe and cleat to the pavement without incident. Been doing it far too long that it's become second nature. That move, alone, seems unlikely to hurt someone's knee, in my opinion, but you never know if that's the case 100% of the time. The only thought that came to mind involves a cleat binding tension set too high, like maybe unclipping once it torqued your knee oddly.
All in all, hope you manage to determine the source and heal quickly. Take care.
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Old 09-20-22, 07:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Wallonthefloor View Post
I always put my right leg down when I stop. I am now noticing knee pain when walking up stairs after my bike ride. I think Im over extending my leg a bit when putting my foot down.. should I just use my other leg sometimes or stand off the saddle?
The answer of course is "stand off the saddle." It's possible that not everyone understood what you meant by that.
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Old 09-24-22, 10:43 AM
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As long as your heel is on the pedal at the 6 oclock position and your leg is straight you are at the right seat height. My feet are big enough that I can touch the ground on the saddle.
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Old 09-24-22, 12:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Wallonthefloor View Post
As long as your heel (in a shoe that has no heel) is on the pedal at the 6 oclock position and your leg is straight you are at the right seat height. My feet are big enough that I can touch the ground on the saddle.
Fixed to include a proviso that has been lost in the mists of time. That sizing method was current in the days when bike racers wore shoes with thin leather soles that lacked heels. Thus, many people who apply that method while wearing thicker-heeled shoes are likely riding around with saddles that are set too high. If you look at some videos of racers in action, you'll see that the bend in their knees at the bottom of the pedal stroke is considerably greater than is the case with many casual and sport riders.
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Old 09-27-22, 07:33 AM
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If youíre comfortably sitting at a light with your butt on the saddle and your foot on the ground, on a standard geometry road bike, without leaning the bike way over, itís highly likely your seat is too low.

The fact that the OPís standard practice is to put a foot down at a light, while seated, and heís experiencing knee pain suggests a reasonable probability that his seat height is off.

itís not uncommon for less experienced or knowledgeable cyclists to adjust their seat height precisely for the purpose of putting a foot on the ground while seated, as opposed to for the proper leg extension while pedaling.

If I were the OP, I would check my seat height, or have it checked by someone who knows bike fit.
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Old 09-27-22, 09:25 AM
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The OP didn't say that they had both feet firmly planted on the ground. It might be that they just have the very tips of the toe of their shoes touching the ground.

If the OP is on a bike that has a very slack seat tube angle or has a seat post with an obscene amount of setback, then it's possible their saddle can be at the correct height and their feet touch the ground firmly while in the saddle.

Most of our saddle height and other aphorisms revolve around a road bike geometry. So I wouldn't quite think it necessarily good to use them for other types of bikes such as cruisers with very slack geometry or saddles with large amounts of setback.

Last edited by Iride01; 09-27-22 at 09:29 AM.
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Old 09-27-22, 10:30 AM
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Even if we stick to just pure road bikes, seat height vs the ground can vary quite a bit with the exact same leg extension. BB heights vary. I've had bikes with BBs from 10-3/8" off the ground to a full 11". Pedals and their spindle centerline to top of platform vary quite a bit. So does stack height of cleats if used. Shoe sole design.

I have a bike now with a very low BB (old Raleigh Competition that I would NEVER make a fix gear!) A joy to ride in the city because stops are so easy. I also modified those shoes with additional sole around the cleats for good walking and no marring of expensive floors. My custom road fix gear and a mid '80s Miyata race bike; both with ~10 7/8" BBs and ridden with race-style shoes and cleats. Get reminded every time I ride them that at slow speeds and lights, the seat is a long ways up.

I ride all those bikes with the same crank lengths and knee bend. First stop when moving to one of my high BB bikes is a re-calibration.
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Old 09-28-22, 09:51 PM
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Maybe your saddle is too high or maybe you should just slip off the saddle while waiting for the light to change. It's just weird that standing on an extended leg is causing knee pain.
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Old 10-02-22, 07:48 AM
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I am no longer experiencing knee pain. It was not from the seat height as I had mentioned above I had twisted my knee falling from an improperly shifting bike. It has since gotten better from riding with my e bike singlespeed and taking a few days off.
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Old 10-24-22, 11:52 PM
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Dismount and put one foot on the ground, staying on the saddle with your foot down might be forcing you to over extend the knee.
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