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Long? Short? Wrong size bike? Factor ostro vam 54

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Long? Short? Wrong size bike? Factor ostro vam 54

Old 05-20-23, 08:45 AM
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Long? Short? Wrong size bike? Factor ostro vam 54

I bought a factor ostro vam size 54 bike with a 110cm stem.
The bike would be comfortable but unfortunately I have problems with my upper back and triceps, my saddle is all forward and I can't tell if these problems are caused by a bike that is too small or too big.

These are the measurements
Height 176cm
Inseam 82.2cm
Foot size 45eu

I ride with a saddle height of 73cm and a bontrager pro aeolus saddle that has about 5cm of center setback (calculated from the toe)
It seems to me that I'm too advanced but as soon as I move back a little or lift the saddle I have problems behind my shoulders (just under the armpits and triceps), to avoid problems I have to pedal lowering the saddle to 72.5cm and keeping it forward.
These problems are pushing me to sell the bike, also because the stem is integrated and it's very expensive and I don't understand if I should make it longer or shorter.
The strange thing is that I have no particular difficulty keeping my hands on the lower part of the handlebars.
Uphill I shoot on the handlebar and I prefer to keep my hands on the control levers rather than on the axis of the handlebar.
Given my body measurements and considering my relatively limited mobility, is a size 54 (55 top tube) with a 110mm stem large or small?
The biomechanics haven't been much help to me
If I ride with a saddle height of 72.5 cm, my toes touch the ground (maybe I'm too short?)
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Old 05-20-23, 10:02 AM
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Did you buy the bike for its sexy looks and aesthetics, or did you buy the bike because you like to ride in the position it provides?
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Old 05-20-23, 10:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Iride01
Did you buy the bike for its sexy looks and aesthetics, or did you buy the bike because you like to ride in the position it provides?
What position? I bought the bike because I liked it. but there is an obvious problem with the weight distribution that had already occurred in the past on a much more endurace bike like the trek domane size 54 and 120 stem, while on other bikes like the emonda tg 54 or the tarmac sl- 6 54 this upper limb problem did not occur
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Old 05-20-23, 10:25 AM
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I hate sounding like a lecture but - in the usual bike fitting, the seat position is established first, then the bars are located to provide the proper lean forward and a reach that allows a proper arm bend. When I look at a bike, one of my first checks is: can the bars be set where I need them with an available stem (and a stem I would actually like to own). All my bikes get ridden and seat, bars and stem tweaked to get just right. And those adjustments change. Sometimes not for years. Sometimes for "this ride". As my conditioning changes. (as true at 70 as it was when I raced at 25.) And with age.

Now this is strictly my opinion, but I see integrated cockpit as a tool for pro racers with teams, sponsors and access to free bikes and as a bike that will serve very experienced riders who know exactly what they need; for the next few years before body changes set in.

And again, my opinion - anyone who sells an integrated bike to someone who does not fit that last category should be willing to take it back. None of this will ever matter to me. I love the range of adjustments you can make with an ordinary stem and by simply swapping one part.
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Old 05-20-23, 10:29 AM
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If you like the Tarmac and the Emonda for how they fit you, then you should be able to get the Factor Ostro set up similarly. The seat tube is 1° slacker on your Ostro, depending on year models of all the other. But you say you have the saddle forward on it.

So look for things like crank length, and whether or not the reach of the bars along with the length of the stem is changing your reach from the saddle up from those other bikes. As well look at the width of the bars. I find too wide can be an issue whereas too narrow is seldom an issue. Though some claim wide opens the chest for breathing, but I've never experienced harder breathing due to narrow bars. I'm on 38 cm wide bars and I measure my shoulders as telling me I can be on 42 cm wide bars. Which I didn't like so I changed them back to 38 cm wide bars.

My first comment is because I see too many people that want a more upright position go for the sexy looks of a bike that is made to give a more aero fit or race fit. And then they screw it up with weirdly angled stems and steerer tube extenders. If you ride the Tarmac and Emonda comfortably then you should be able to do the same on the Factor Ostro.

Last edited by Iride01; 05-20-23 at 10:35 AM.
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Old 05-20-23, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Iride01
If you like the Tarmac and the Emonda for how they fit you, then you should be able to get the Factor Ostro set up similarly. The seat tube is 1° slacker on your Ostro, depending on year models of all the other. But you say you have the saddle forward on it.

So look for things like crank length, and whether or not the reach of the bars along with the length of the stem is changing your reach from the saddle up from those other bikes. As well look at the width of the bars. I find too wide can be an issue whereas too narrow is seldom an issue. Though some claim wide opens the chest for breathing, but I've never experienced harder breathing due to narrow bars. I'm on 38 cm wide bars and I measure my shoulders as telling me I can be on 42 cm wide bars. Which I didn't like so I changed them back to 38 cm wide bars.

My first comment is because I see too many people that want a more upright position go for the sexy looks of a bike that is made to give a more aero fit or race fit. And then they screw it up with weirdly angled stems and steerer tube extenders. If you ride the Tarmac and Emonda comfortably then you should be able to do the same on the Factor Ostro.
I have to figure out if I have to put a longer or shorter stem since the black inc integrated handlebar costs €700 I can't afford to be wrong
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Old 05-20-23, 10:49 AM
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There is nothing good happening by having your saddle far forward. You probably need it moved back, then need to raise and shorten the stem. You're essentially leaning way forward from your description and need to reach up above your shoulder's working angle to reach the hoods.

54 is not a bad size for your height and inseam.
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Old 05-20-23, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Kontact
There is nothing good happening by having your saddle far forward. You probably need it moved back, then need to raise and shorten the stem. You're essentially leaning way forward from your description and need to reach up above your shoulder's working angle to reach the hoods.

54 is not a bad size for your height and inseam.

So should I mount at least a 10cm or even a 9cm stem? but isn't that too short on a size 54 bike? Even on the domane size 54 and on the emonda also size 54 (which have a higher stack and smaller reach) I still tended to come forward, maybe I shouldn't raise the saddle again to increase the saddle-handlebar difference? The sensation of pulling with the hands on the handlebar especially uphill, I have read that it can depend on a limited handlebar saddle height difference
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Old 05-20-23, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by 3dbiker
So should I mount at least a 10cm or even a 9cm stem? but isn't that too short on a size 54 bike? Even on the domane size 54 and on the emonda also size 54 (which have a higher stack and smaller reach) I still tended to come forward, maybe I shouldn't raise the saddle again to increase the saddle-handlebar difference? The sensation of pulling with the hands on the handlebar especially uphill, I have read that it can depend on a limited handlebar saddle height difference
Why would a 90mm stem be too small for a 54? Stems come in a range, and that range applies to all bike sizes.

I don't know what you're supposed to do, I just know that your description of your fit sounds like it is too far forward and uncomfortable. And it sounds like you are in that position because you have this wrong idea that certain size bikes get certain size stems.
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Old 05-20-23, 11:02 PM
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Originally Posted by 3dbiker
So should I mount at least a 10cm or even a 9cm stem? but isn't that too short on a size 54 bike? Even on the domane size 54 and on the emonda also size 54 (which have a higher stack and smaller reach) I still tended to come forward, maybe I shouldn't raise the saddle again to increase the saddle-handlebar difference? The sensation of pulling with the hands on the handlebar especially uphill, I have read that it can depend on a limited handlebar saddle height difference
The starting point for your saddle set back should be where you can maintain your preferred back angle using only your back muscles. If you have to use your arms to support your torso, you're too far forward. Many newbs will move the saddle forward to shorten the reach, under the mistaken belief that reach is causing their shoulder and back pain. It isn't. They're essentially doing pushups to keep from falling forward. After establishing your back angle and saddle setback, find out where your hands want to go and adjust your stem rise and length to put the brake hoods under them. Generally, the back angle and angle of the humerus form an 80-90 degree angle. The current fashion if for a slightly shorter but lower reach to achieve a similar back angle, compared to, say 20-40 years ago.

I can't get into specifics without seeing how you sit on the bike. Besides leg length and overall height, arm length and posture will also be a factor. If you ride with a curved or humped back, it will shorten your effective reach by 1-2 cm.

Also consider that the cockpit shape of this bike is low. Factor markets it as "comfortable," but if you're used to riding a Domane or an H2 Emonda with a full complement of stem spacers and/or the stem flipped upwards, there is no way you're going to get comfortable on this bike without some body rehab.

Last edited by oldbobcat; 05-20-23 at 11:15 PM.
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Old 07-30-23, 10:05 PM
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Hello, it seems to me that the stem is too long for your height, but since there are more problems after changing the positions and height of the saddle, perhaps the best thing to do is to change the bike. Its just my opinion.
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