Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fitting Your Bike
Reload this Page >

Long front-center aero road frame? Maybe?

Notices
Fitting Your Bike Are you confused about how you should fit a bike to your particular body dimensions? Have you been reading, found the terms Merxx or French Fit, and don’t know what you need? Every style of riding is different- in how you fit the bike to you, and the sizing of the bike itself. It’s more than just measuring your height, reach and inseam. With the help of Bike Fitting, you’ll be able to find the right fit for your frame size, style of riding, and your particular dimensions. Here ya’ go…..the location for everything fit related.

Long front-center aero road frame? Maybe?

Old 08-26-23, 01:24 PM
  #1  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Oceanside, CA
Posts: 390

Bikes: 2017 Lynskey Sportive Disc, 2021 Lynskey Pro29, 1977 Schwinn Super LeTour 12.2

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 118 Post(s)
Liked 70 Times in 29 Posts
Long front-center aero road frame? Maybe?

Looking for my first aero road bike. I have pretty short legs and super short femurs, so to fit on a bike without leg pain, I typically wind up on steep seat tube angles with a zero setback post and short cranks. That makes my knees feel great, but I wind up with a lot of forward weight, and barely use my drops at all when I'm headed downhill because I always feel like I'm going to endo. Bike fits help a little, but ultimately, both fitters with whom I've worked have suggested custom frames.

I feel much more comfortable going downhill on slack headtubes, and basically anything with a long front-center that works to forgive the fact that I'm leaning my weight so far forward. There are some gravel bikes out there where I might feel somewhat comfortable going down a steep hill in the drops, but most road bikes seem to have a much tighter headtube angle so they don't steer like boats. I'm also clearly not a geometry pro, so I'm sure there's other stuff at work.

Any suggestions for bikes I might want to look at for a kind of go-fast aero shape? I'm thinking something I could get by with for a couple of beginner triathlons and also take out for 50 to 100 miles and feel like I'm not on an 80s touring or mountain bike.

Random fact. I absolutely loved the fit of my old Giant Omnium track bike. The seat tube angle and reach felt great, but since I only used it on the track, I also never had to go downhill more than coming out of the bank in the turns.
cormacf is offline  
Old 08-26-23, 02:56 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 4,083
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2332 Post(s)
Liked 2,092 Times in 1,310 Posts
Have you considered a TT/Tri bike? They have steep seat tube angles and longer front centers. For instance, if handy building bikes, buy a used Cervelo P and you could use dropped bars for training and in a Tri, put full aero bars on.

A more reasonable choice might be something like a Cervelo Caledonia, it is longer front center than most road bikes. I considered buying one for endurance racing type rides.
GhostRider62 is offline  
Old 08-26-23, 03:32 PM
  #3  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Oceanside, CA
Posts: 390

Bikes: 2017 Lynskey Sportive Disc, 2021 Lynskey Pro29, 1977 Schwinn Super LeTour 12.2

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 118 Post(s)
Liked 70 Times in 29 Posts
I'd never heard of the Caledonia! That looks like a sportier version of my current bike, with more front-center and shorter chainstays. That could be perfect, and allow me to go full upright rando-bike with my Lynskey (it already has dynamo routing, and I have a dynamo 650b wheelset built)!

Originally Posted by GhostRider62
A more reasonable choice might be something like a Cervelo Caledonia, it is longer front center than most road bikes. I considered buying one for endurance racing type rides.
cormacf is offline  
Old 08-26-23, 03:44 PM
  #4  
I'm good to go!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 14,531

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5998 Post(s)
Liked 4,627 Times in 3,192 Posts
I don't think your Omnium is much different in geometry than a Trek Emonda or a Specialized Tarmac. Which are race fit road bikes. So if you still like the low and aero position they give, then you should look at them and see if they'll let you try them out for several miles if possible. Parking lot rides just don't give the same experience.

If your legs are short, then you might try a Trek Domane in a size or two smaller than what others might typically get based on height alone. A smaller size in it will also give you a lower stack and more aero position. All of these bikes are somewhat designed with aero tubes.

Last edited by Iride01; 08-26-23 at 03:48 PM.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 08-26-23, 06:10 PM
  #5  
OM boy
 
cyclezen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Goleta CA
Posts: 4,340

Bikes: a bunch

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 502 Post(s)
Liked 623 Times in 425 Posts
Originally Posted by cormacf
Looking for my first aero road bike. I have pretty short legs and super short femurs, so to fit on a bike without leg pain, I typically wind up on steep seat tube angles with a zero setback post and short cranks. That makes my knees feel great, but I wind up with a lot of forward weight, and barely use my drops at all when I'm headed downhill because I always feel like I'm going to endo. Bike fits help a little, but ultimately, both fitters with whom I've worked have suggested custom frames.

I feel much more comfortable going downhill on slack headtubes, and basically anything with a long front-center that works to forgive the fact that I'm leaning my weight so far forward. There are some gravel bikes out there where I might feel somewhat comfortable going down a steep hill in the drops, but most road bikes seem to have a much tighter headtube angle so they don't steer like boats. I'm also clearly not a geometry pro, so I'm sure there's other stuff at work.

Any suggestions for bikes I might want to look at for a kind of go-fast aero shape? I'm thinking something I could get by with for a couple of beginner triathlons and also take out for 50 to 100 miles and feel like I'm not on an 80s touring or mountain bike.

Random fact. I absolutely loved the fit of my old Giant Omnium track bike. The seat tube angle and reach felt great, but since I only used it on the track, I also never had to go downhill more than coming out of the bank in the turns.
To your Qs
Feeling 'On Top of', vs 'In/behind' is a combination of a couple of things, not just front/ctr, but also stack, stem angle and length, and bar config (compact,short/long drop, reach), Realized Reach would really work in conjunction with the other elements. A longer reach is not necessarily felt as 'too much forward'.
You don;t give info on your stem nor the bars.
Anyway, Can't get too deep, too much to write... LOL!
ALSO, are you or have you been a predominantly MTB rider? If so, the move back and forth between modern mtb spec bikes and road bikes can be a bit disconcerting - mtb = 'in', road still usually feels 'on top of'...
You also don;t give a Frame size for your Lynskey - that important to any comment/conversation!
Here's a GEO comparison of 5 bikes , Lynskey SPortive, SPec ROubaix, Spec Shiv, Spec Transtion (older TT design), Cervelo Caledonia
Key things to look at
STACK !!! compared to reach
Front-Ctr...
all else is in consideration also.
TT/Tri bikes have Long Length, low stack, and short front ctr (relatively).
Lynskey has quite Short Front/Ctr and ALSO LOW STACK, compared to most 'do-it'all' road bikes.
Compare both those measurements with either the Roubaix or Cervelo, Roubaix & Caledonia have longer Frt-Ctr, Caledonia has LOWER stack than Lynskey...
To be more 'IN' on a bike, than your Lynskey, you might look for higher stack & a bit more Frt-Ctr...
Many other bikes to review with Specs similar to Roubaix, when comes to Stack & Frt/Ctr.

Give info on your Lynskey frame size, stem info and bar info... if youo want further discussion...
Experiment: not knowing what the stem/bar config currently is - you could get/buy an inexpensive stem +16 deg, 10mm longer than current stem (given the current is a 6 or 7 turned down) mount it turned up
mount it 'up' - 10 mm long would be approx 'realized STACK' increase of 20mm (2cm). Would get you closer to what the Roubaix stack might feel... (or any other bike with more stack.
AERO - frame aero is less important that rider position/posture/setup , helmet, might be close to wheel aero...
A TT/TRI frame, in my mind, would be a considerably less pleasant 'distance road ride' machine. Metric century - TT or road bike? no comparison...
Clip-on aero bars work, if properly setup...
Aero 'Look' - that's up to you, as to importance.
a bit more, but enough for now...
Ride On
Yuri
cyclezen is offline  
Old 08-27-23, 01:07 PM
  #6  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Oceanside, CA
Posts: 390

Bikes: 2017 Lynskey Sportive Disc, 2021 Lynskey Pro29, 1977 Schwinn Super LeTour 12.2

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 118 Post(s)
Liked 70 Times in 29 Posts
Had 30 minutes to kill this morning, so I popped around the corner to the local bianchi dealer and road a Sprint. It actually felt kind of great without any adjustments other than saddle height. I only wrote it a few blocks, so I would need to do more to figure out if it handles well in the downhills, but this gives me some hope that maybe sportier, racier bikes are just generally better for my body shape than the more traditional early 2000s endurance geometry I've been riding.

Also, it was the first bike I've ever ridden with wireless shifting, and as much as I thought I would hate it, it's pretty magical, especially for someone who is starting to have the beginnings of arthritis soreness in the hands.
cormacf is offline  
Likes For cormacf:
Old 08-27-23, 04:52 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Kontact's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6,608
Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4140 Post(s)
Liked 1,330 Times in 868 Posts
I don't know why short femurs automatically means your saddle needs to be far forward. KOPs is one a way of making sure you have adequate setback, not an important biomechanical relationship that needs to be maintained. If you have atypical body dimensions you have to be smart about how you approach fit. Your femurs do not run the show.

I'd highly recommend you put your saddle height and setback in a normal place on a bike with a relatively low stack height.
Kontact is offline  
Likes For Kontact:
Old 09-02-23, 03:16 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Right where I'm supposed to be
Posts: 1,596

Bikes: Franklin Frames Custom, Rivendell Bombadil

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 101 Post(s)
Liked 178 Times in 111 Posts
I recently purchased a Velo Orange Rando frame specifically because it has a much longer front-center that typical non-custom frames. Of course when looking at geometry you must take into account everything, and specifically for your saddle tip-to-bars you have to start with where your saddle is going to be in relation to the BB to begin with. Whether the OP would choose a medium or large, either one has a whole lot more front-center than any other frame listed here.

https://bikeinsights.com/bikes/5e668...o-orange-rando

Even then, as was noted by cyclezen, we know nothing of the OP's bike in question to begin with. Drop bars can vary wildly in both reach and drop, and same for stems. It may or may not be frame reach the OP really needs. I've found videos from John Cobb to be very helpful for myself in regards to positioning, so much so that I'm running my bars lower than I ever had or even considered, and I'm more comfortable than ever on the bike doing it.
https://speedandcomfort.com/pages/fitting-tips
https://speedandcomfort.com/blogs/comfort-issues?page=2
Garthr is offline  
Old 09-03-23, 10:10 AM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
oldbobcat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Boulder County, CO
Posts: 4,328

Bikes: '80 Masi Gran Criterium, '12 Trek Madone, early '60s Frejus track

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 488 Post(s)
Liked 422 Times in 321 Posts
The Felt F series geometry has a relatively long reach and low stack. I like these bikes a lot but they should fit you better.
oldbobcat is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.