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Folding Bikes Discuss the unique features and issues of folding bikes. Also a great place to learn what folding bike will work best for your needs.

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Old 08-14-16, 09:38 AM   #26
edelay
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>> I bought a Spurcycle bell when we visited Copenhagen in the begining of August this year.
Spurcycle: better bicycle bells and other enduring bike accessories.

That is the bell I had hoped to find. Simple, retro. I'll buy one online today.

>> On traveling with a Brompton next time: Bromptons are nice, but we decided we would use some 20" beaters nex time. Reason is security. I would not lock up and leave a Brompton for 5 minutes in Denmark (and I would guess other places with similar infrastructure for bikes) a bike is a bike, and bikes are left in the bikeracks. You can not bring them into shops and museums as easily as you can do other plases, an you can be punished with a fee for taking them into parks.

Yeah, there is something to be said about having an old beater and not worrying about it.

>>Next time you should take the ferry between Oslo and Copenhagen. Plenty of space for bikes and also for you,

I would have loved to, but my wife was concerned about being sea sick at night. She has a lot of plane, train, cair, boat issues regarding that.

> We use detatchable pedals so that could be a good upgrade for your Curve.

I'll make that purchase in the next few days using the cash back rewards from the trip I just finished.

>Is it possible to find a smaller suitcase for it?

Perhaps.

Oh same bad news... I have been going for rides since I got back home... just to help me get through the jet lag. Noticed that when I applied the front brake, I could feel it pulsing. Thought the rim was getting thin and about to fail. Checked it out and the front rim had gone out of true. Trued that up. Check the back rim too and had to true it a bit as well. From the original post in this thread I had expressed concerns about the front rim and it looks like there was too much pressure on it.

Did a few more fixes and tweaks that I had been meaning to do... when I was out for a test ride I noticed that the chain ring is warped. I'll need to replace that... but was planning already to get one that wasn't welded onto the cranks.

So, unlike I had originally thought, the bike did suffer some damage. This will be the last time I use a soft case with a good bike... or use a soft case with a beater.
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Old 08-14-16, 02:04 PM   #27
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@ edelay

The bell was in the 1905 shop I mentioned to you

Sea sick: You eat your dinner early. No alcohol. At 18.30 you take one tablet for (against) travel sickness. At 20.30 you are on your back in your cabin- and stay there. Works when there is a restless sea. Often it is as quiet as in a bath tub.

Damage on the Curve: I guess one of the great things about the Brompton is that it is protecting its own drivetrain when folded. Also the compact fold is not only about size but since the parts "stay close together" it kind of distributes the impacts so not just one part (like a wheel or a chainring) take the beating. Can be solved by using a hardcase. Look into the trailer solution BF and also Origami (and others) use if you can find a good hard case. May be the best way of dealing with the suitcase once you reach your destination.

Keep us update with what you do for upgrades and future traveling.
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Old 08-15-16, 05:03 AM   #28
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Glad to hear your trip went well and especially like the self portrait. As for Spurcycles bells, I purchased four of them for the wife on I for our Rivendells and Bromptons. Pricey but great bells.

I have been to Copenhagen, but never cycled while I was there but cycled in Paris (what a nightmare). I feel your pain when cycling in Paris though I suspect with us being tourists we are not privy to the best routes for getting around the city.

It sounds like your "Dahon in a legal suitcase" was a success.
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Old 08-15-16, 08:37 PM   #29
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Glad to hear your trip went well and especially like the self portrait. As for Spurcycles bells, I purchased four of them for the wife on I for our Rivendells and Bromptons. Pricey but great bells.

I have been to Copenhagen, but never cycled while I was there but cycled in Paris (what a nightmare). I feel your pain when cycling in Paris though I suspect with us being tourists we are not privy to the best routes for getting around the city.

It sounds like your "Dahon in a legal suitcase" was a success.
I'll source a hard case and will use that. This should prevent the minor rim and chain ring damage.

P.S. Man... just missed out on getting a Dahon Dove this weekend. A single speed would have been perfect for this trip.
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Old 08-16-16, 11:10 AM   #30
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I took a Dahon Helios SL to Puerto Rico in a Dahon bag on Jet Blue once. They also bent the chainring, on the return flight. Hard case for me from now on.
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Old 08-16-16, 11:29 AM   #31
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I took a Dahon Helios SL to Puerto Rico in a Dahon bag on Jet Blue once. They also bent the chainring, on the return flight. Hard case for me from now on.
I've flown with Jetblue with a bike on board a few times; no issues so far.
To Aruba with a Citizen Tokyo(w/ rear der.) in a standard Samsonite suitcase. Size & weight were within the limits:
I've flown with Jetblue with a bike on board a few times; no issues so far.
To Aruba with a Citizen Tokyo in a standard Samsonite suitcase. Size & weight were within the limits:
2013 Citizen Tokyo in a suitcase by 1nterceptor, on Flickr

From Puerto Rico with a Brompton in it's original cardboard box. Size & weight were within the limits:
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Old 10-18-17, 09:37 AM   #32
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Did you have to separate the frames apart to fit in the luggage or could it just be folded?
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Old 10-18-17, 11:46 AM   #33
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Did you have to separate the frames apart to fit in the luggage or could it just be folded?
For most 20 inch and 16 inch folders; folding the frame should be enough to fit them in a standard luggage.
May have to remove wheels, seat post, etc.:
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Old 11-06-17, 07:59 AM   #34
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First off, I really like Amsterdam. What a beautiful and interesting place. Have been for a ride most mornings, only the rain prevented the other rides.

The bike situation is very similar to Copenhagen as follows:
- lots of black utility bikes with upright riding positions
- common for people to ride one handed (very dangerous) using a phone or carrying something
- large number of cargo bikes, usually with kids in them but other loads too
- paths tend to be seperated from roadway by at least a curb sometimes by parking

The differences from Copenhagen are as follows:
- gasoline powered scooters are allowed to ride in the bike lanes, some do at very high rates of speed. Had one overtake me and somehow not hit me at a high rate of speed
- bike lanes more extensive than Copenagen. Provisions for a bike on almost every street
- all bikes are locked up with 1 or 2 heavy locks
- while helmets were fairly uncommon in Copenhagen they are very rare in Amsterdam.
- Cooenhagen is actively trying to engineer better biking into their city (example the green wave) while Amsterdam appears to already know how to this and the infrastructure is already in place
- no bike rental stations like in Copenhagen (Paris, London, Vancouver...) perhaps it isn't needed?

I don't know why I waited over 30 years to visit this city. If you ignore all of the frat boys on pot and hooker vacations it is a very enjoyable place to be.
Great Report! Thank you.
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Old 11-06-17, 08:17 AM   #35
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Did you have to separate the frames apart to fit in the luggage or could it just be folded?
It depends upon the bike, your time situation and the case you have available.

20" bikes:
(split approach)
With my split a frame you can have your bike packed and unpacked and rideable pretty quickly. As little as 5 minutes. I do this with a Dahon Visc (d18) and will try it soon on New Mariner D8 and Vitesse frames which have the right setup for a nice conversion. Importantly, the rear wheel is not removed and this changes your time and approach. Seat Post and Handlebar of course must be also removed and I have a cable splitter on the front brake so that handlebar and cable can otherwise stay connected to the rear half, full chainline attached.

(unsplit approach)
However, some frames are difficult to split because of their latch. Those ones I remove the wheels like I am assuming in the video below. "the shape" of case tends to change (more square) to fit it all in. For me it, when I have done it this way it has taken me about 30 minutes to really get things apart, packed well and back together. But I can do it with the Mu's this way. It is important, I think, to have it "down" how to remove your rear wheel adn reinstall it. Can be more complicated with an internal hub, but worth the practice anyway as you will get flats some day anyway and need to go through the process. Quick Release Hubs and derailleurs are generally easier t his way.

Do note that either way, I almost always unbolt the main derailleur bolt from the hanger for travel. It just is good insurance against having trouble at the other end with your gearing.

16" Dahon bikes except te Curve, as well as Dahon Curl and Brompton Bikes can generally fold into a suitcase without any real dissassembly. On my Visc SL 16" I remove the Seatpost and handlebar. No wheel removal and no frame split required. The Curve 16 though, in my experience, falls into the dissassemble mode like the 20" bikes above. That said it seems some folks have worked it out on the Curve in some other threads here -- quite impressive into the backpack BTW.

In all cases, the size of the Case is a determinant. Split bikes, for me, can fit into off the shelf suitcases to fit the 62" airline measure. Disassembled bikes fit generally into "right sized" boxes. Maybe the Origami Case is the right size box for this approach. I would like to get one to try.

One strong element for the disassembly approach is you can have the Mu Frame bike fit. Mu's are nice bikes as is the Curve which is a slight variant of it. I think this is also the Origami and Tern approach as well. I would like to get more experience with their bikes.

I lean towards the "speed" of packing and reassembly but I have a system for modifying the bikes too to make this work on the 20" scale. That first change does take me a few hours to implement on any bike, so its an "investment" one way or another.

Traveling with a bike this way, however you do it, is really a fantastic way to experience the world.

Last edited by L Arnold; 11-06-17 at 08:19 AM. Reason: some details
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