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Touring questions

Old 08-02-17, 03:54 PM
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Touring questions

I wasn't sure whether to post this in the touring section or here, but I figured seeing as it's folding bike specific questions I might get more responses here.

First off is choice of bike. I've had a Dahon Mu Uno for years, and have always wanted a folding bike that can replace my main road bike. I've posted on here a couple of times trying to narrow down on one and keep on coming back to Airnimal. I'm not interested in a folding bike to use as part of a commute on public transport, but primarily to make storage inside easier (as well as the possibility of putting into a bag and carrying into a hotel room when touring) and to ease transport on long distance trains and planes. If there are any alternatives that people find better I'd love to hear.

The second question is pannier placement. I'd only be looking to do lightweight touring, with a couple of changes of clothes, and staying in hostels/couchsurfing/hotels. The airnimal Joey can take a front and a rear rack. I hear one of the 'downsides' of front panniers is that they slow down steering. Could this be of benefit on a smaller wheeled bike for the amount I'd be carrying? I'd then also look at using a very small handlebar bag for camera/wallet/phone, and a seat-tube bag for an extra layer/waterproof whilst riding. Would this be a good option, or should I go for 2 rear panniers and a rack-top bag or a larger handlebar bag for the extra layer/waterproof (and the camera/phone/waller if I ditch the small one).

Thanks for any help you can give. Any advice for touring on a folding bike, especially if you've done it with couchsurfing, that you think I may have overlooked would be great to hear.
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Old 08-02-17, 05:46 PM
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If you're going to get a Joey, bring 520 tires and tubes as spares, because they are fairly difficult to find on the road.

You didn't say what kind of distances you're going to be covering, but I'll share a personal bias - I'm not a fan of flat bars, and especially not for long-distance touring. I like a drop bar with the ability to change hand positions to help relieve stress.

Whenever I toured with Bike Fridays, I had no problem bringing my bike into hotels without folding it first. I wasn't staying at high-end hotels, though. I didn't do silly things like use the hotel's white towels to wipe my chain down. If the weather was nasty outside, I'd take the time to clean the tires and frame so that I wouldn't be tracking grime into the hotel. Never had hotel staff ask me to fold the bike first or leave it in a different spot than my room.

I recommend a rear rack with panniers and a racktop bag. If you get panniers, get the kind that can snap or strap together to make them easier to carry. That will carry the majority of your stuff. A small saddle bag and small handlebar bag can carry items you need while pedaling without digging into the panniers/rack bag.

I try to avoid bulky handlebar bags, as the tendency is to stuff them full and weigh them down. A heavy handlebar bag also affects center of gravity by raising it, which is the last thing you want on a tour. I consider the Brompton head tube mounting block the best way to go because steering is independent of whatever weight you've got on the front. If you're going to use a front rack, get a lowrider to keep the center of gravity down.

It almost goes without saying, but bring a basic tool kit along for repairs on the road. Folders tend to need a little more care and feeding than non-folders, and sometimes strange things happen. Always best to be prepared rather than stuck and waiting for a ride into the next town. With a few of my Bike Fridays, I always carried the little headset wrench that came with the bike because of the headset's tendency to loosen with use. If you have room, bring extra spokes and a spoke wrench too.

Last edited by bargainguy; 08-02-17 at 05:51 PM.
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Old 08-02-17, 06:00 PM
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Originally Posted by bargainguy
If you're going to get a Joey, bring 520 tires and tubes as spares, because they are fairly difficult to find on the road.

You didn't say what kind of distances you're going to be covering, but I'll share a personal bias - I'm not a fan of flat bars, and especially not for long-distance touring. I like a drop bar with the ability to change hand positions to help relieve stress.

Whenever I toured with Bike Fridays, I had no problem bringing my bike into hotels without folding it first. I wasn't staying at high-end hotels, though. I didn't do silly things like use the hotel's white towels to wipe my chain down. If the weather was nasty outside, I'd take the time to clean the tires and frame so that I wouldn't be tracking grime into the hotel. Never had hotel staff ask me to fold the bike first or leave it in a different spot than my room.

I recommend a rear rack with panniers and a racktop bag. If you get panniers, get the kind that can snap or strap together to make them easier to carry. That will carry the majority of your stuff. A small saddle bag and small handlebar bag can carry items you need while pedaling without digging into the panniers/rack bag.

I try to avoid bulky handlebar bags, as the tendency is to stuff them full and weigh them down. A heavy handlebar bag also affects center of gravity by raising it, which is the last thing you want on a tour. I consider the Brompton head tube mounting block the best way to go because steering is independent of whatever weight you've got on the front. If you're going to use a front rack, get a lowrider to keep the center of gravity down.

It almost goes without saying, but bring a basic tool kit along for repairs on the road. Folders tend to need a little more care and feeding than non-folders, and sometimes strange things happen. Always best to be prepared rather than stuck and waiting for a ride into the next town. With a few of my Bike Fridays, I always carried the little headset wrench that came with the bike because of the headset's tendency to loosen with use. If you have room, bring extra spokes and a spoke wrench too.
Thanks for the tips. I'll be buying just the Joey frame and wheels and swapping over the components from my current road bike so it will have drop bars. I'll be hopefully hoping around European cities, so no crazy long distances, but as a result might occasionally treat myself to a nice hotel. Also I'd like to be able to bag it up if I'm coughsurfing just as a sign of courtesy to my hosts.

Do you not think the slower steering effect of a front rack is worth having on a folding bike then? I'm just worried about being twitchy down long descents and was wondering if the weight at the front might nullify this a bit.
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Old 08-02-17, 06:11 PM
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Does having a front rack and bags on a folder make the steering any more stable? I haven't a clue, as I've never toured with this kind of setup. I wouldn't want to hang much weight on the front of any folder (except the Brommie with the mounting block) no matter how it was distributed, but that's just me.

If you wind up going with a front rack, one more thing to consider - does the front rack interfere with the fold? If it does, it negates the ability to fold the bike quickly. I'm not clear that you'll have to bag the bike when visiting a hotel or couchsurfing unless the area you're touring is a congested urban area with tiny apartments or other living quarters. It's nice to want to not inconvenience folks who are putting you up, but if you're racking up a lot of miles each day, chances are you'll want to spend more time resting and relaxing and less time folding and fiddling with the bike.
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Old 08-02-17, 08:17 PM
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I bought the Tyrell IVE precisely to do travelling with.
I left user impression in this thread.
https://www.bikeforums.net/folding-bi...ns-review.html


Its a nice bike to consider for what you plan to do.
It folds small and can be pushed around folded.
Its also using standard deraileur and parts.

I do ride long distances with it and the flat bar with Ergon grip bar end extensions have proven themselves thru all my rides.
The advantages are :
1. Better sighting in the upright position
2. Less hassle to fold the bike
3. Multiple hand positions with the Ergon grip extensions
4. No ache after long rides (Roadbars tend to be setup more aggressively, resulting in neck/shoulder aches on long rides, unless one is very seasoned and/or the position is fitted for longer rides)

Cons :
1. Lack of a more aero position to go faster or in headwinds.


Luggage on the bike wise, I have a small handlebar bag (small camera or phone/wallet), there is an option for a front luggage truss (like the Brompton), so I use a Ortlieb bag when needed on the front which does not affect steering.
On the rear, I have a rack which I usually have a bag for clothes and a tripod.
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Old 08-02-17, 10:19 PM
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A Brompton M6R rekindled my interests in bicycle touring, and it's the bike I would keep if I could only have one - love its versatility.

Smallest/10 sec fold and wheels-while-folded means it's usually easier taking inside with me than locking up outside - that resolves the bike/gear security issue which was a major reason I quit touring decades ago.

Frame-mounted, quick-release, backpackable, 30L/22lbs, single front T-bag carries my fully self-supported touring gear (I'm an ultra-lighter) and does stabilize the small-wheeled handling nicely. Bike folds without needing to remove luggage, and the bike also makes a great luggage cart to wheel my gear around in a number of different configs. With stealth cover, this rig is the near equivalent of a standard 2-item wheeled carry-on air traveler easily wheeled, without detection, through the lobby of a Grand Hyatt, or nice restaurant.

T-bag worn as a backpack, with compact/locking fold bike on top of my shoulders make it by far the easiest bike to carry through tight quarters and for distance - I often hike my rig 1/4 mile into the woods for stealth camping, once up a 30 story staircase, and can easily walk up from my basement to 3rd story attic, narrow hallways and staircases incl., with a hand free to open and close doors along the way. T-bag worn backwards (on chest) and bike resting on my knees and I can fit in a single seat on a bus or train, even front passenger seat of a car making hitchhiking a real option.

I rigged mine as comfortably as my 700x32 gravel bike, including a drop-bar 3-position equivalent, and can tip comfort either way just by tire air pressure. However, I do forfeit rough off-road capability, and I'm about 3%/0.5mph slower on the Brompton.

CLICKY
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Old 08-03-17, 02:04 AM
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Originally Posted by reppans
A Brompton M6R rekindled my interests in bicycle touring, and it's the bike I would keep if I could only have one - love its versatility.

Smallest/10 sec fold and wheels-while-folded means it's usually easier taking inside with me than locking up outside - that resolves the bike/gear security issue which was a major reason I quit touring decades ago.

Frame-mounted, quick-release, backpackable, 30L/22lbs, single front T-bag carries my fully self-supported touring gear (I'm an ultra-lighter) and does stabilize the small-wheeled handling nicely. Bike folds without needing to remove luggage, and the bike also makes a great luggage cart to wheel my gear around in a number of different configs. With stealth cover, this rig is the near equivalent of a standard 2-item wheeled carry-on air traveler easily wheeled, without detection, through the lobby of a Grand Hyatt, or nice restaurant.

T-bag worn as a backpack, with compact/locking fold bike on top of my shoulders make it by far the easiest bike to carry through tight quarters and for distance - I often hike my rig 1/4 mile into the woods for stealth camping, once up a 30 story staircase, and can easily walk up from my basement to 3rd story attic, narrow hallways and staircases incl., with a hand free to open and close doors along the way. T-bag worn backwards (on chest) and bike resting on my knees and I can fit in a single seat on a bus or train, even front passenger seat of a car making hitchhiking a real option.

I rigged mine as comfortably as my 700x32 gravel bike, including a drop-bar 3-position equivalent, and can tip comfort either way just by tire air pressure. However, I do forfeit rough off-road capability, and I'm about 3%/0.5mph slower on the Brompton.

CLICKY
Very impressive!
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Old 08-03-17, 06:32 AM
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Originally Posted by pinholecam
I bought the Tyrell IVE precisely to do travelling with.
I left user impression in this thread.
https://www.bikeforums.net/folding-bi...ns-review.html
Thanks for the tips. I did look at the IVE after seeing your very good review a while back. I have to admit the wheel size worries me a bit, and I was really hoping to find a bike I could buy as just a frame-set to save some money.

You make some good points about flats vs drops, but I think I've just ridden on drops so much now that flat bars just don't feel right any more. When you do cyclocross style riding you get used to drop bars for every situation.
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Old 08-03-17, 06:35 AM
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Originally Posted by reppans
A Brompton M6R rekindled my interests in bicycle touring, and it's the bike I would keep if I could only have one - love its versatility.
Thanks for the very informed post.

The neatness and compactness of folded Bromptons has always appealed, and I'm English so it's kind of a natural attraction, but the small wheel size does concern me a bit for touring. What sort of distances and terrain do you ride it over? Would you ever descend and alpine pass on it when loaded or is that a big no go?
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Old 08-03-17, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Dheorl
Thanks for the very informed post.

The neatness and compactness of folded Bromptons has always appealed, and I'm English so it's kind of a natural attraction, but the small wheel size does concern me a bit for touring. What sort of distances and terrain do you ride it over? Would you ever descend and alpine pass on it when loaded or is that a big no go?
Good point. I live and tour along the US New England coastline so the terrain tends to be flat to hilly - no real mountains. I'm a recreational cyclist and tend to bicycle tour ~50 miles/day in more densely populated urban and coastal vacation areas where the bicyclists/bicycling infrastructures are more common, the sightseeing is denser, and parking/accommodations are scarcer - ie., places where a bicycle has a cost/hassle sightseeing advantage. I'm also into RVs, motorcycles, kayaking and backpacking and so for rural/mountainous road touring, I'll use the RV or motorcycle - ie, places where the sights are distant and parking/camping accommodations are plentiful. I'm not a fan of rural bicycle touring since our rural arterial roads have little to no shoulders, high speed differentials, and rare fellow cyclists - too much 'sitting-duck' vehicular exposure for little reward (for me). Also not an exercise nut - I'm into the most efficient mode of transport for any given sightseeing tour and often choose a bicycle to minimize my sightseeing cost/hassle/effort (ie, popular/densely populated areas). So yeah, for me, I'd be more likely to take the bus to that mountain top Alps village, cycle around it to see everything I wanted, maybe stealth camp in nearby woods, then back on the bus back down to the next destination .

If I were to consider riding the occasional mountain pass, I'd add a 2nd manual-shift chainring, wear my rain cape as a air brake, and/or descend slower (yes 349 wheels are scarier over 30mph, the front luggage has a stabilizing effect, although extra weight will burn more brakes), and/or need to stop more frequently to let the small rims cool. If many mountain passes, then there's the expensive disk brake mod, or better yet - a different bike - but I though you mentioned mostly hopping around European cities and no crazy distance riding.

Last edited by reppans; 08-03-17 at 09:12 AM.
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Old 08-03-17, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by jur
Very impressive!
Appreciate that Jur, esp. coming from you - THE master folding bike tourer!
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Old 08-03-17, 09:38 AM
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I think the steering stability is better on low trail small wheel bikes with front weight on them.
My Brompton uses a front bag, my Bike Fridays have pannier racks , and share the pannier set.


Abundant CGOAB posts of folding bike touring, most popular seems Bike Friday.. their travel bikes fold and come apart,

in combination.. to go in a suitcase.. you have many options in the build menu, they then work from..

including frame sizing... most folding bikes are one size only...

Brompton makes 1 frame but several bar masts and seat post options to adjust the bike fit some..

one of the shop owners of the Portland Brompton dealership tours on his , he is a mid sized guy..

Touring bag + a Carradice saddle bag.

Heinz Stuke did 50 byears of touring on a variety of bikes , in recent decades, used a Bike Friday ,
... then when they became his bike sponsor, a Brompton.





...

Last edited by fietsbob; 08-03-17 at 09:57 AM.
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Old 08-03-17, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Dheorl
...Thanks for any help you can give. Any advice for touring on a folding bike, especially if you've done it with couchsurfing, that you think I may have overlooked would be great to hear.
S & S couplers on your current or new bike?
Folding Travel Bikes using S and S Machine Bicycle Torque Couplings™
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Old 08-03-17, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by reppans
Good point. I live and tour along the US New England coastline so the terrain tends to be flat to hilly - no real mountains. I'm a recreational cyclist and tend to bicycle tour ~50 miles/day in more densely populated urban and coastal vacation areas where the bicyclists/bicycling infrastructures are more common, the sightseeing is denser, and parking/accommodations are scarcer - ie., places where a bicycle has a cost/hassle sightseeing advantage. I'm also into RVs, motorcycles, kayaking and backpacking and so for rural/mountainous road touring, I'll use the RV or motorcycle - ie, places where the sights are distant and parking/camping accommodations are plentiful. I'm not a fan of rural bicycle touring since our rural arterial roads have little to no shoulders, high speed differentials, and rare fellow cyclists - too much 'sitting-duck' vehicular exposure for little reward (for me). Also not an exercise nut - I'm into the most efficient mode of transport for any given sightseeing tour and often choose a bicycle to minimize my sightseeing cost/hassle/effort (ie, popular/densely populated areas). So yeah, for me, I'd be more likely to take the bus to that mountain top Alps village, cycle around it to see everything I wanted, maybe stealth camp in nearby woods, then back on the bus back down to the next destination .

If I were to consider riding the occasional mountain pass, I'd add a 2nd manual-shift chainring, wear my rain cape as a air brake, and/or descend slower (yes 349 wheels are scarier over 30mph, the front luggage has a stabilizing effect, although extra weight will burn more brakes), and/or need to stop more frequently to let the small rims cool. If many mountain passes, then there's the expensive disk brake mod, or better yet - a different bike - but I though you mentioned mostly hopping around European cities and no crazy distance riding.
I guess europe is a very different beast to most of the USA. Hoping around cities and mountain riding are by no means mutually exclusive; one ride I'd love to do is Southern France to central Italy, which would occur among others passing the Mont Blanc and Matterhorn massifs on the route I'd do. One town I'd look to stop off in on the way has 3 bike shops for a population of 1,400, so fellow cyclists are not in short supply
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Old 08-03-17, 11:09 AM
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Originally Posted by 1nterceptor
It is something I've considered but being an aluminium frame I'm not sure it would be suitable, and also wouldn't make the bike as packable as I'd like. Thanks for the suggestion though.
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Old 08-03-17, 11:22 AM
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My Bike Friday has the front rack, I prefer to put the weight there. It does reduce any twitchiness from the frame. And carries the panniers low enough it doesn't impact center of gravity. I also have the rear rack. For touring, balanced weight is key.
For folding, the front rack does not affect the fold (except sometimes I have to push it off the tire to unfold, wide tires). The rear rack definitely enlarges the fold so I only use the rear rack if I have to do so.
Ideal for touring to me is pannier front rack with tent strapped across the top, and a big saddle bag on back because it's easier to take off than the rear rack for folding purposes. You can sling the saddle bag over your shoulder but you need to do something else with the rack once you remove it. Large minnehaha saddle bag is good and reasonably priced.
Pack light, wash often, lol.
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Old 08-03-17, 07:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Dheorl
Thanks for the tips. I did look at the IVE after seeing your very good review a while back. I have to admit the wheel size worries me a bit, and I was really hoping to find a bike I could buy as just a frame-set to save some money.

You make some good points about flats vs drops, but I think I've just ridden on drops so much now that flat bars just don't feel right any more. When you do cyclocross style riding you get used to drop bars for every situation.

There will always be a compromise between fold size and wheel size.
The 18" wheel is a compromise between the 20" and the 16".
Better fold size than the 20" and faster/better ride than the 16".
In fact, my experience with the bikes has been that the 18" on the IVE only looses in max speed vs 406 and 451.
Other factors, the 18" have done well beyond expected.
That includes comfort (due to 1.5" tires and running at 55-65psi), ability to handle some trail/gravel due to the 1.5" tires and good cruising speed (in which case its not that different to 406/451).

The other thing is that I run 1x10, and the 18" does get to a lowish 26.7GI which is what I have found sufficiently low to get up the inclines I encounter.

The wheelbase is long, hence the bike is stable at speed and on downhills. (1058mm)



Flatbar wise, you might be surprise.
I come from a road/tri bike background too and had the same apprehensions regarding the 'inferiority' of flat bars.
But now, I do appreciate the on the IVE after so many tours/long rides.

Furthermore, afaik, a road bar on any bike with a holding handlebar mast will be either clunky in the fold or interfere with folding.


Do look around.
Cheers
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Old 08-04-17, 09:30 AM
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I too am a Flat Bar with Bar ends fan. With Adjustable height handlbars on my Dahon MU D10 or my Swift I can lower the handlebars or raise them depending on my whim.

Putting all the load on the rear of the bike will probably make you shimmy down high speed hills. Strap your stuff on---do not use bunji cords which will add wiggle. There are some cool low rider front pannier racks that I would go with.

Short Rear rack with just a top bag would be excellent to balance your load. When going with panniers on the back you will need to go with a full size bike rack to keep your heels from hitting the panniers---even then with my feet they usually collide.

Buy a complete bike---not just frame and wheels because then you will have everything to fit for sure. Sometimes coming up with a strange part to fit your folder will be a real pain. You can replace some of the parts with gear you already have and sell your excess on ebay.

I have stripped thousands of bikes and sold the parts and frames separate on ebay---you get way more for the parts than the full bike usually.

I call your type of travel---Credit Card touring---
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Old 08-04-17, 09:31 AM
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Recently in Washington DC I stayed at a Marriott for a week and I was in and out with my folder---it was always clean---and no issues at all.
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Old 08-04-17, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Dheorl
It is something I've considered but being an aluminium frame I'm not sure it would be suitable, and also wouldn't make the bike as packable as I'd like. Thanks for the suggestion though.
better to get a new frame then built up with the BTC, rather than a retrofit .. steel or titanium ..

R&E in Seattle build their 20" wheel 6 Pack, the main frame tubes have BTC on both ends .. it then is in 6 parts ..

Custom all the way. in Steel , made one at a time.





....

Last edited by fietsbob; 08-04-17 at 10:54 AM.
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Old 08-04-17, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Dheorl
Thanks for the tips. I'll be buying just the Joey frame and wheels and swapping over the components from my current road bike so it will have drop bars. I'll be hopefully hoping around European cities, so no crazy long distances, but as a result might occasionally treat myself to a nice hotel. Also I'd like to be able to bag it up if I'm coughsurfing just as a sign of courtesy to my hosts.

Do you not think the slower steering effect of a front rack is worth having on a folding bike then? I'm just worried about being twitchy down long descents and was wondering if the weight at the front might nullify this a bit.
Front loading generally works well with low trail bikes. You can get a low trail bike by having a "normal" sized wheel with a lot of rake or a small wheel. The Airnimal with a 24" wheel might not be low trail.

There are some good comments in the thread. ERTO 406 is a good tradeoff point for folding bikes. Small enough fold. Pretty good performance. Lots of tire and tube choices as well as folding bike manufacturers in that size.
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Old 08-04-17, 11:33 AM
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My 406 Credit Card tourer

These images may spur some ideas...







* Tires - Schwalbe Marathon Supreme 1.60", folding
* 18-109GI on tap
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Old 08-04-17, 11:52 AM
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I have bar ends on several of my flat bar bikes and they certainly help with different hand grip positions but they don't vary back angle much and that's proving more important to me on longer rides. The adjustable height handlebar stems, like on my Dahon Speed P8, don't do the trick either since I like to change grip and back angle at every few miles. Drop bars have the best grip/back angle variety for me, not to mention best shift/brake control from a number of different positions (incl. incl interrupter levers), but yeah, they tend to ruin compact folds.

Brompton's P bars are a great solution for a compact touring folder, but are ugly in my eyes. Rigging an aero drop position in the bottom of my M bar's "U" was also a great free mod that added comfort, and the aero benefits cut the speed/efficiency gap to my gravel bike in half. The narrow space results in an overlapping grip which took some getting used to (and is still disconcerting to ride in faster downhills) but with hands together, it is a bit more aero like tri-bars - a blessing in headwinds.
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Old 08-04-17, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by pinholecam
There will always be a compromise between fold size and wheel size.
The 18" wheel is a compromise between the 20" and the 16".
Better fold size than the 20" and faster/better ride than the 16".
In fact, my experience with the bikes has been that the 18" on the IVE only looses in max speed vs 406 and 451.
Other factors, the 18" have done well beyond expected.
That includes comfort (due to 1.5" tires and running at 55-65psi), ability to handle some trail/gravel due to the 1.5" tires and good cruising speed (in which case its not that different to 406/451).

The other thing is that I run 1x10, and the 18" does get to a lowish 26.7GI which is what I have found sufficiently low to get up the inclines I encounter.

The wheelbase is long, hence the bike is stable at speed and on downhills. (1058mm)



Flatbar wise, you might be surprise.
I come from a road/tri bike background too and had the same apprehensions regarding the 'inferiority' of flat bars.
But now, I do appreciate the on the IVE after so many tours/long rides.

Furthermore, afaik, a road bar on any bike with a holding handlebar mast will be either clunky in the fold or interfere with folding.


Do look around.
Cheers
Good to know the IVE is still stable at high speeds. Is there much in the way of racks for the IVE. I can't see any on their website and it looks like they might be a bit awkward with the way it folds.

Originally I'm from a mountain biking background so have plenty of experience with flat bars, but just prefer drops for virtually everything these days, even lower grade mtb trails. The bike I'm looking into most (Airnimal Joey) and a potential second option (BF Llama) both remove the bars for the fold, so drops shouldn't be much of an issue.
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Old 08-04-17, 04:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Rick Imby
I too am a Flat Bar with Bar ends fan. With Adjustable height handlbars on my Dahon MU D10 or my Swift I can lower the handlebars or raise them depending on my whim.

Putting all the load on the rear of the bike will probably make you shimmy down high speed hills. Strap your stuff on---do not use bunji cords which will add wiggle. There are some cool low rider front pannier racks that I would go with.

Short Rear rack with just a top bag would be excellent to balance your load. When going with panniers on the back you will need to go with a full size bike rack to keep your heels from hitting the panniers---even then with my feet they usually collide.

Buy a complete bike---not just frame and wheels because then you will have everything to fit for sure. Sometimes coming up with a strange part to fit your folder will be a real pain. You can replace some of the parts with gear you already have and sell your excess on ebay.

I have stripped thousands of bikes and sold the parts and frames separate on ebay---you get way more for the parts than the full bike usually.

I call your type of travel---Credit Card touring---
Good to know about your experiences with different panniers.

I'm hoping to get just a frame because I've spent so long getting all the components on my current bike to be right for me that I'd use as many as humanly possible, and from what I gather with something like an Airnimal most of it is standard fit. I'll trust my LBS to point out what won't work.

That and my current bike has been with me long enough there's no way it's being sold. It's being stripped down to the frameset, touched up, polished and hung on the wall

I've heard the term credit card touring, but I've often heard it used to refer to going away for the weekend with pretty much nothing but the bike, some water and a credit card. I'm planning on some clothes for the evenings, change of cycling clothes and spending at least a week or two, so wasn't sure if the term still applied.
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