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Old 11-06-17, 04:06 PM   #1
Bonzo Banana
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Shimano Tourney TX-800 derailleur

I see this derailleur is getting used a lot now. Seems to be the first Tourney model actually aimed at use with freehub/cassette based drivetrains. Reviews seem great and it looks close to Altus/Acera in design.

Just wondered for those with more experience of this product if it really is the first decent Tourney derailleur. It probably will end up getting fitted to mid level folding bikes in the near future.

Normally the Tourney name is something to be wary of if not immediately avoided because it's normally fitted to low end bikes with freewheels. However apart from the Tourney name seems pretty decent.

2017-2018 SHIMANO Product Information Web

If nothing else its positive that Shimano are trying to push the stronger freehub design into a lower price level.
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Old 11-06-17, 04:30 PM   #2
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Just curious - what kinds of problems are you experiencing with previous gen Tourney derailleurs?

Reason I ask - I work on a fair number of used (non-folding) bikes that sport the Tourney derailleurs. I much prefer the low-end Shimano derailleurs to low-end SRAM, for ex., as far as being able to adjust and keep adjustments, smoothness of shifting, and resistance to being bent. In my mind, Shimano is worlds ahead of SRAM, but that's just my experience, yours may differ.
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Old 11-06-17, 07:48 PM   #3
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I think the bias against older Tourney mechs is more psychological than anything tangible. They're boat anchors, but even cheap Shimano boat anchors work astonishingly well.
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Old 11-07-17, 04:28 AM   #4
Bonzo Banana
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I did have a bike with this derailleur and to be honest it was a pretty hopeless derailleur after riding in rain etc, the spring was weak and shifting was poor unless regularly cleaned and oiled. It seem to have quite a short life before problems appeared with it.



However most of the problems I think are related to the freewheel design. Often freewheel hubs don't have the threads perfectly machined so you get freewheel wobble which makes shifting less precise and the seals on the hub if any allow water in creating bearing problems plus the bearings position means its easy to bend or break the axle. Bending the axle leads to more shifting problems.

Some of the newer Tourney's have the adjusters set in a plastic housing which are more prone to flex.

It's Shimano's entry level deraileur built to a low price and common on the most budget bikes. I don't think they cope with much abuse, rain, dirt etc. I think the small wheels of folders is why many folding bikes use the derailleurs from the mountain bike range rather than road bike because of all the crap that hits them with the derailleur being so close to the road. It's common to see Altus and Acera derailleurs on many folding bikes and less common to see Claris for example at least in the UK. I guess if you are a fair weather cyclist who keeps to the road and is quite light and doesn't do stupid stuff like drops from kerbs etc they are probably fit for purpose.

The Tourney TX800 though a) looks a much stronger design, pretty decent actually and b) is paired to a freehub drivetrain which has many benefits over freewheels. It seems like a huge jump in quality/performance/strength despite the Tourney name.



That said I too find Shimano entry level better than the generic derailleurs you now see fitted to many budget bikes. I've no experience of SRAM entry level derailleurs but I would guess they would be between Shimano and Microshift in quality. There are however quite a range of Tourney derailleurs now both current and past models and these span a wide range of quality/performance I think. The one pictured at the top is pretty much meant to the be the worst I think.

Last edited by Bonzo Banana; 11-07-17 at 05:15 AM. Reason: update
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Old 11-07-17, 08:44 AM   #5
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That top one is the RD-TY18, right? I agree, that design is pretty dreadful. Didn't know it was even being spec'd on any folders these days, but given that most of the money on a folder goes into the frame and engineering, not much left over for parts, which are often bottom of the barrel on entry-level folders.
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Old 11-07-17, 12:56 PM   #6
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The main difference between the two tourney versions lies in the derailer movement with cable pull. The older one has its pivots at right angles so the jockey pulley moves parallel to the wheel axle, relying on chain length to keep the jockey close to the cogs. The newer one has angled pivots so moves the jockey more in a line parallel to the cog outer profile. It gets trickle down tech after decades. But using plastic for housing the pivots will be OK for light duty but regular use should see wear and slop develop.
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Old 11-08-17, 09:26 PM   #7
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I had one on a previous bike and I put in a fair bit of riding using them (maybe 50km a week for 2yrs ), did not have any issues.
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Old 11-09-17, 06:09 AM   #8
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I'm a mid price bike parts snob---I would not think of buying a bike with Tourney derailleurs on it. Buy good stuff to begin with, keep it clean and ride the sh*t out of it. Every mile you don't put on your car because you ride your bike is close to a half dollar in your pocket.

All my bikes have paid for themselves over and over....
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Old 11-09-17, 03:40 PM   #9
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In fairness there are so many levels of bike components in the Shimano range and you can often physically see the difference if you have the opportunity to compare them side by side. You can see the material and manufacturing quality differences. I still feel the TX-800 has taken the Tourney range to a higher quality level especially when paired with a freehub as per Shimano's recommendations. I would of never recommended Tourney before but the TX-800 seems to be the exception. Saying that if I ended up with a TX800 on a bike in the future I might keep an eye out for a cheap Altus or Acera rear derailleur and do a quick swop.
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