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Citizen Bike for Heavy Rider

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Old 01-18-18, 10:05 AM
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absurdchrono
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Citizen Bike for Heavy Rider

I'm looking to get back into biking after not touching one for well over a decade at this point. I've been looking for smaller, foldable bikes to get me and my girlfriend, and I found Citizen bikes, and fell in love with their aesthetic, especially their Miami frame. I don't intend to do any sort of racing or long-distants rides, and am mostly trying to use it for the occasional ride down the street to the market or around the neighborhood to try and stay a little fit. The only problem is, I'm pushing 255lbs, and I noticed their bikes are meant for a max weight of ~220lbs. What would happen if I ride on a Citizen regardless of the 'recommended' weight? Do I run a high risk of damaging the bike? Are there alternatives comparable in price that would be a better fit?
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Old 01-18-18, 12:47 PM
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i own a citizen miami and it is a very well built bike and rides very well for running around towne ,etc.The weight limits most brands advertise usaully are lower than they can really support to give a safety margin.If you did damage it atleast you didn't spend alot
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Old 01-18-18, 12:51 PM
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Originally Posted by sdwphoto View Post
i own a citizen miami and it is a very well built bike and rides very well for running around towne ,etc.The weight limits most brands advertise usaully are lower than they can really support to give a safety margin.If you did damage it atleast you didn't spend alot
Well that's good to know at least! I keep seeing Citizen bikes are good starter/beginner bikes. I've never owned a 'road' bike in my life, only ever mountain bikes when I was a kid/teen. This actually helps me out a lot, thank you!
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Old 01-18-18, 02:19 PM
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Most bikes can accommodate more weight than that listed. There is usually a cushion for the sake of added safety.
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Old 01-19-18, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Pinigis View Post
Most bikes can accommodate more weight than that listed. There is usually a cushion for the sake of added safety.
I figured as much. I mean, it's not like i'm +50lbs over the listed weight limit. Good to know that, even in the future, there's a bit of cushion if I ever decide to get another bike.

Originally Posted by avole View Post
However, you are quite a lot above the limit, especially when you include riding gear. Id look at another bike, or do what I did, and go on a diet.
I guess that'd be a problem, but I really don't plan on getting into 'riding gear'. At most I only ever really planned to get a rear cargo rack for small errands like picking up a few groceries here and there.
Even if I could go on a diet (I have dietary restrictions due to health issues from my youth), I don't think that by itself is going to help me shed +30lbs of weight to meet the bike's stated requirements, I think i'd need to include a bit of exercise- which is precisely one of the reasons I'm trying to get a bike. That being said, I did ask for comparable alternatives. Do you possibly have a recommendation of another bike that would be comparable to the Citizen bikes?
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Old 01-19-18, 11:51 AM
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Your low cost Asian bikes may be stressed over the weight limit, just not forever.. You good with that?
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Old 01-19-18, 12:09 PM
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Originally Posted by avole View Post
However, you are quite a lot above the limit, especially when you include riding gear. Id look at another bike, or do what I did, and go on a diet.
By virtue of the fact that the OP is planning on riding a folding bike, any bike, he WILL lose weight. The weight limits are largely posted as a "CYA" by manufacturers from a liability standpoint...but they still have their limits.

That said I can't imagine the difference between "no problem" and "snaps in half at the hinge" is the first 15 pounds ABOVE the listed weight maximum. The longtime durability of any machine used at or near it's maximum limits is usually a bigger consideration than an immediate catastrophic failure.

To the OP: I say "go for it" and you'll be on the downhill side of that limit weightwise as you use the bike soon enough!
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Old 01-19-18, 03:32 PM
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Originally Posted by absurdchrono View Post
I don't intend to do any sort of racing or long-distants rides, and am mostly trying to use it for the occasional ride down the street to the market or around the neighborhood to try and stay a little fit.
Every little helps but honestly the occasional ride down the street and around the neighborhood isn't really going to do much for fitness. It helps if it gets you riding much more down the line, but don't disappointed if you don't see much progress if you're just toddling around town for awhile. Nothing wrong with that, it's mainly what I do--especially in the winter but yeah, expectations. Can you ride a regular size bike and when you lose the 30 pounds, then go with a folder?
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Old 01-19-18, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by avole View Post
It'll be difficult for folding bikes. Dawes, for example come in at under 105kg and Brompton at 110kg. You wouldn't have a problem with non-folders.
I know it'd be difficult, but there's not a lot of options for me. I don't have a lot of space and I'm also trying to minimize the amount of space the bike would cost. Plus, money is also a factor for me. But those are two names I will have to look into now.

Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Your low cost Asian bikes may be stressed over the weight limit, just not forever.. You good with that?
Yeah I assume the lower cost means a shorter 'lifespan', but I'm just worried about the thing suddenly giving out on me one day.

Originally Posted by avole View Post
Riding gear means clothes, by the way. The manufacturers always quote all-up weight.
That's fair, but I figure an extra pound of clothing isn't going to really tip the scale in a considerable way. Then again, I'm not familiar with the stress points of a bike, so I can't say for sure.

Originally Posted by avole View Post
I believe in safety, so go with manufacturer's recommendations. They test, whereas anonymous forum contributors can't. That goes especially for folding bikes, which do have design - and stress - compromises.
Again, fair enough. Safety is a big concern, but at the same time, as I've said, I'm limited, and as long as I'm not running an exponentially high risk of catastrophic failure, I'm highly considering it.
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Old 01-19-18, 04:14 PM
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Originally Posted by FolderBeholder View Post
By virtue of the fact that the OP is planning on riding a folding bike, any bike, he WILL lose weight. The weight limits are largely posted as a "CYA" by manufacturers from a liability standpoint...but they still have their limits.

That said I can't imagine the difference between "no problem" and "snaps in half at the hinge" is the first 15 pounds ABOVE the listed weight maximum. The longtime durability of any machine used at or near it's maximum limits is usually a bigger consideration than an immediate catastrophic failure.

To the OP: I say "go for it" and you'll be on the downhill side of that limit weightwise as you use the bike soon enough!
I like this positive attitude!

Originally Posted by avole View Post
Poor advice. Have you tested bikes to verify what you say? I thought not. Pure supposition, and potentially dangerous.
Apparently, you don't like that positive attitude. The real question is, what is the potential for danger? Is it exceptional to the point of probability, or is it a 'hey this can break at some point because of your weight difference'?

Originally Posted by tdonline View Post
Every little helps but honestly the occasional ride down the street and around the neighborhood isn't really going to do much for fitness. It helps if it gets you riding much more down the line, but don't disappointed if you don't see much progress if you're just toddling around town for awhile. Nothing wrong with that, it's mainly what I do--especially in the winter but yeah, expectations. Can you ride a regular size bike and when you lose the 30 pounds, then go with a folder?
Not to get too terribly into my own personal life, but I currently live a very sedentary lifestyle, and ANY exercise is a positive thing. I'm not expecting to shlack off the pounds in droves, I understand my limits, and I'm honestly just trying to get my body moving again after real life took a whack at me, and that means going for an occasional ride around the block or up to visit friends a mile or so away. I guess when I said get 'fit' I should have said 'have an activity so I don't sit or lie down for nearly 24 hours at a time.'
That being said, I don't have space to store a full sized bike for extended periods of time without it impacting me or my girlfriend's day to day living arrangement. I also don't really have a lot of money to spend on two bikes for myself and one for my girlfriend, so I'm sort of hoping to go with one and have it for a bit before having to replace it, and as far as my living situation goes, a folding bike is about the only way i can see.
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Old 01-19-18, 04:31 PM
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If you are aware , through frequent inspections that the end of your ownership of it being useful is going to not be far off ,

then you should have few surprises ..
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Old 01-20-18, 10:24 AM
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Just to add to the debate. Most frames won't fail immediately when someone well over their weight limit gets on (within reason) but you accelerate the fatigue stress and may be seriously cutting down on the lifespan of the frame. It could last months or a year or so and then fail at the worst possible moment. It's important not to get into the mindset that the frame is strong and you got away with it. Aluminium frames always get weaker with time, they start off much stronger and the decline in strength to the point where the frame fails and that should be many, many years, I would guess maybe 20-40 years for a frame designed for the road (non performance) with a rider within the weight limits.

From what I've seen the Citizen bikes look quite weak, low end single wall rims, freewheels, everything looks fairly poor. I certainly wouldn't consider them to be strong bikes. Giant folding bikes I think are rated to 136kg rider weight but a maximum 160kg load on the bike and the frames have a lifetime warranty. Some folding bikes do have high weight capacities like the Giant models.
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Old 01-20-18, 09:08 PM
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First of all and most importantly, good for you for wanting to get out on a bike, enjoy life and get some exercise. Dont worry about the fact that a ride around the block wont lose 30 lbs. Getting active will, and a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.

As far as recommendations for a folding bike for your weight, I dont know much about new bikes but I do know that vintage Raleigh Twentys are great bikes, affordable and could handle your weight, they are over-built. Great riding bikes, too.

If your set on a Citizen, if I were you I would just go for it and not hop any curbs. Good luck to you regardless!
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Old 01-22-18, 11:32 AM
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Used mountain bike for $75. Ride it for a year. Sell it for $75.

Where I live, people put them on the curb. I have in the past. Not worth the trubble to do craigslist for $50.

Edit: I would amend this to say you need to have bike fixit skills to make this work, but if the bike shifts/brakes on a test ride, it's probably OK

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Old 01-22-18, 03:10 PM
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So many opinions. So little time....
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Old 01-28-18, 11:19 AM
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Have you considered a folding adult trike for yourself, and the Citizen for your lady?

You can find folding trikes online.
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Old 01-28-18, 04:11 PM
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The Greenzone folding bikes are rated just slightly higher at 230 lbs. Like the Citizen Miami, the price is very affordable but I think that some of the parts on the Greenzones are of higher quality, such as the crankset and wheels. I don't know but you can check them out here for the "Value Edition".

Black https://www.greenzonebikes.com/foldable-bike-black

Blue https://www.greenzonebikes.com/index...&product_id=71

Orange https://www.greenzonebikes.com/index...&product_id=70

Red https://www.greenzonebikes.com/foldable-bike-red

Their prices include shipping (In the Continental USA) and include a carry bag, water bottle, and cage.

Good luck with what you decide on.

Edward

Originally Posted by absurdchrono View Post
I'm looking to get back into biking after not touching one for well over a decade at this point. I've been looking for smaller, foldable bikes to get me and my girlfriend, and I found Citizen bikes, and fell in love with their aesthetic, especially their Miami frame. I don't intend to do any sort of racing or long-distants rides, and am mostly trying to use it for the occasional ride down the street to the market or around the neighborhood to try and stay a little fit. The only problem is, I'm pushing 255lbs, and I noticed their bikes are meant for a max weight of ~220lbs. What would happen if I ride on a Citizen regardless of the 'recommended' weight? Do I run a high risk of damaging the bike? Are there alternatives comparable in price that would be a better fit?
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Old 01-30-18, 12:20 PM
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The greenzone bikes also look quite poor in components in my opinion.

There is a nicely equipped folding bike for $300 here.

https://www.amazon.com/Sundeal-Foldi...d+folding+bike

The factories look pretty modern with some decent tooling.

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Old 01-30-18, 12:46 PM
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A pricier option might be the Bike Friday, they do offer some models with reinforced frames that will support heavier riders. There is a Diamond Llama model that is able to support up to 330 lbs. Also a heavy rider option to their Pocket Rocket model that will support up to 260 lbs.
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Old 01-30-18, 01:00 PM
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You might want to consider a steel framed folding bike. They tend to be stronger and give more warning if the frame is going to fail. However such bikes are normally at the bottom end of pricing for mass produced bikes and normally have the lowest quality components fitted to the frame. Ideally you'd want a steel frame, double wall wheels and decent freehub based drivetrain. I suppose you could buy 2 folding bikes and swop out the components to give you exactly what you wanted and sell on the folding bike you have spare (i.e. aluminium frame but entry level parts). 10% over the maximum weight limit given should be ok for a while anyway. 240 would probably be ok with 265lbs especially if you treated it well.
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Old 01-31-18, 09:55 PM
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Let's Keep It Real!

I think one of the reasons why I don't participate in this group very often anymore is because of what I privately call, "Escalation of Recommendations". Someone posts they just need a very basic, affordable folding bike for riding in the neighborhood, at the park, to pick up a couple of items at the grocery store a few blocks away etc. and the answers slowly but surely start to point to the pricey "boutique bikes".

For uses like the ones aforementioned, I don't think high-end components are going to make much of a difference, but will sure spike up the cost quite a bit.

The OP just wants a bike to ride locally and close to home. To be quite frank, any decent steel framed bike would work and still keep well within budget.

Just my two cents for what it's worth.
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Old 02-04-18, 05:02 AM
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There are entry level bikes using weak, short life components and there are one step up bikes that start using better quality components like entry level freehubs, double wall rims etc. For me the entry level components are false economy for most people especially heavier riders. Unless the rider is both light in weight or rides rarely and in decent weather only I would advise against entry level. In the US folding bikes with decent components seem to start around $250-300 and in the UK maybe 220. I would consider those prices extremely affordable especially with the savings compared to using motorised or public transport. Sometimes they can pay for themselves in a few months.
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