Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Folding Bikes Discuss the unique features and issues of folding bikes. Also a great place to learn what folding bike will work best for your needs.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 02-09-18, 08:18 PM   #76
Abu Mahendra
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bali
Bikes: Dahon Dash P18, Dahon Dash Altena, Bannard Sunny.
Posts: 1,375
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 458 Post(s)
With its longer wheelbase, longer chainstays and bosses/eyelets galore, the LHT is closer to a tourer. Among Surleys, it is the Straggler that's closer to a so-called gravel bike. 'Gravel' can be thought of as Cyclocross Plus. I am aiming to buil a Straggler this year once the 2018 model in Blueberry arrives here.

Something like this, but with Abu's knack for aesthetic considerations...




Quote:
Originally Posted by reppans View Post
Have a look at the Surly Long Haul Trucker, one of the most popular touring bikes in the US - it's just a variation of the gravel bike theme.

Sorry if I was not clear, but my point is that any type of bike can be seen as a compromise vis-a-vis another type of bike. For me, overall, a folder (and specifically the Brompton) provides the most options, and least compromises, for how and where I prefer to tour. A more traditional touring rig, such as mine shown above, is what actually made me quit touring decades ago, and the Brompton is THE bike that got me back into it (and I've owned folders since '91). There are many reasons, but the three most important for me are 1) security (the B comes inside most places, often carting my gear); 2) skipping the particularly nasty sections like dangerous traffic and pouring rain (multi-modal options); and 3) easiest bike to carry distance, specifically hiking/bushwhacking deeply into the knarly Eastcoast woods for secluded/private wild camping, nearly as nice as backpacking.
Abu Mahendra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-18, 08:20 PM   #77
BikeLite
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 638
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
nm

Last edited by BikeLite; 02-10-18 at 03:39 AM.
BikeLite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-18, 08:21 PM   #78
BruceMetras
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: San Rafael, California
Bikes:
Posts: 2,035
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 88 Post(s)
Quote:
Avole, the new folding bike forum troll.
That's not really fair. He has a personal opinion as do those who debate him. And as far as I can tell, has remained polite/respectful.

Touring means different things to different people. Jur has done some amazing tours on his small wheeled folders.
Jur's cycling photo albums/photo essays

Apparently Avole has as well on traditional touring rigs.

This has been a pretty good discussion .. Reppans packing his Brompton through the woods for his touring adventure, opened my eyes some as to what can make for a touring rig.
BruceMetras is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-18, 12:01 AM   #79
reppans
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: New England
Bikes: Brompton M6R, Specialized Tricross Comp, Ellsworth Isis, Dahon Speed P8
Posts: 593
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 225 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abu Mahendra View Post
With its longer wheelbase, longer chainstays and bosses/eyelets galore, the LHT is closer to a tourer. Among Surleys, it is the Straggler that's closer to a so-called gravel bike. 'Gravel' can be thought of as Cyclocross Plus. I am aiming to buil a Straggler this year once the 2018 model in Blueberry arrives here.
Yes, you are correct. I tend to oversimplified the term 'gravel bike' to encompass everything from quick handling CX bikes to stable tourers as long as they have drop bars, and clearance for wider off-road capable tires. My Tricross was designed as do-it-all bike with a relatively upright riding position and relaxed geometry between that of a CX bike and true tourer, and it does have standard mounting points for front and rear racks and fenders.

In any case for us small-wheeled fans, I think riding any full sized bike, regardless of geometry, will feel like a truck/touring bike .
reppans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-18, 06:37 AM   #80
Bonzo Banana
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 359
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 125 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by avole View Post
Who is making a negative claim?? You misunderstand.

Also, because one person has toured on a folding bike really proves nothing. I mean, I have too, but it isn't the perfect tool for touring, you'd have to admit.
I've seen many comments on touring with folding bikes and generally they have been very positive but maybe I'm missing your point somehow. I've seen people comment on touring with Bromptons across Asia, taking on buses and trains, storing in their hotel room and riding great distances through amazing countryside etc. It sounded like the perfect way to tour to me. I guess they weren't the fastest bikes or the strongest but the convenience seemed amazing and a full sized rigid bike with the much greater inconvenience seemed like the compromise.

Also if you want a bike they whole family can use and quickly adapted to rider height etc then a normal rigid bike is the compromise or you want a bike that can be easily stored or transported then the normal bike etc is the compromise.

I guess there are compromises everywhere when you think about it but a folding bike may be the least compromised for many uses.

I remember reading about a teacher whose bikes were constantly stolen at School until he finally settled on the cheapest nastiest low end bike he could get his hands on, made it look as horrible as possible and upgraded a few key parts just to keep it reliable. At the time of writing which was a few years ago it had not been stolen so he got to ride everyday without issue which benefited his health and wealth plus he enjoyed riding. The right bike for him was actually the wrong bike for most people.
Bonzo Banana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-18, 11:15 AM   #81
avole
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: France
Bikes: Brompton, Time, Bianchi, Jan Janssen, Peugeot
Posts: 239
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 142 Post(s)
As I've said,I have toured with the Brompton, for most of the reasons you say. However, I've also taken my road/touring bike and from the riding speed, comfort and loading point of view it wins hands down. That includes covering some of the same terrain in Oz, especially close to the great divide whear a large gear range is a virtual must.

I can sympathise with the teacher, by the way. My superb Trek was stolen in Holland, even though I'd used several chains and had only popped into a shop for 5 minutes to get some water. I replaced with a bright purple and silver cheapo Peugeot for exactly the same reason as the teacher, and, 15 years later, the bike, never locked in its entire life, is still with me. Don't use it much now, but will dig it out this summer as it is great on unmade roads and forest tracks.
avole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-18, 01:26 PM   #82
berlinonaut
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 299
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 135 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by avole View Post
As I've said,I have toured with the Brompton, for most of the reasons you say. However, I've also taken my road/touring bike and from the riding speed, comfort and loading point of view it wins hands down. That includes covering some of the same terrain in Oz, especially close to the great divide whear a large gear range is a virtual must.
The issue is that "your Brompton" does not equal "any folding bike", not even "any Brompton". You just started a thread about after many years you decided to make your Brompton fit your body by buying a longer seat post and different bars. So obviously you have been touring with a bike that did not fit you - no wonder that other bikes have been more comfortable. Has nothing to do with the Brompton being a folding bike or folding bikes in general. Regarding the gears: It is possible to fit different gear setups like Shimano Alfine or a Rohloff hub even to a Brompton aftermarket and many folders offer these already as stock options. So again the issue is the consequence of a semioptimal single decision of your's and has neither any connection to the Brompton or folders in general. And regarding the "is a virtual must": Heins Stücke has been touring with a Sachs 3-speed hub for the most parts of his decade-long bicycle travels. A pretty good proof that material is overrated - it may be more comfy but is by no ways a must. Regarding luggage: When traveling with a Brompton you have to limit luggage to a degree. But on the other hand: The t-bag takes more than 30 liters and a Backpack on the rear carrier takes 50 liters or more - should be sufficent for bicycle travels. And there are other folders on the market that just take the same panniers and bags to the same amount than any full sized bike. Thus again not an issue of the Brompton or folders in general but of your very own decision.

Extrapolating from your experience with a single bike that seems not have been used to it's possiblities as foundation to the claim "folders are no good for touring" is just not valid.
berlinonaut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-18, 01:52 PM   #83
avole
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: France
Bikes: Brompton, Time, Bianchi, Jan Janssen, Peugeot
Posts: 239
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 142 Post(s)
Take a deep breath, go outside, look at the stars and marvel at the skies. Then ask yourself if it really matters.

There was a man 2500 years ago who worked it out.
avole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-18, 04:16 PM   #84
linberl
Senior Member
 
linberl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: SF Bay Area
Bikes: 2003 Bike Friday (restored & sold: 1997 Trek 720, 1993 Trek 520)
Posts: 1,448
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 523 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by avole View Post
As I've said,I have toured with the Brompton, for most of the reasons you say. However, I've also taken my road/touring bike and from the riding speed, comfort and loading point of view it wins hands down. That includes covering some of the same terrain in Oz, especially close to the great divide whear a large gear range is a virtual must.

I can sympathise with the teacher, by the way. My superb Trek was stolen in Holland, even though I'd used several chains and had only popped into a shop for 5 minutes to get some water. I replaced with a bright purple and silver cheapo Peugeot for exactly the same reason as the teacher, and, 15 years later, the bike, never locked in its entire life, is still with me. Don't use it much now, but will dig it out this summer as it is great on unmade roads and forest tracks.
I'm curious. Is the brompton the only folding bike you have toured with? Or are there other folders you have toured with (which ones)?
linberl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-18, 04:29 PM   #85
SparkyBeacon 
Tourer
 
SparkyBeacon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Indianapolis
Bikes: Birdy folder, Bike Friday, Burley tandem, Nishiki fixie conversion, Dahon "Coca-Cola" Speed P8
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tkrocks2 View Post
I travel on very rough roads that would better suited for a mtb.
The Birdy folder has some modest suspension front and rear. I like how it smooths out rough pavement.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Birdy right side 800x600.jpg (94.6 KB, 101 views)
SparkyBeacon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-18, 05:50 PM   #86
Abu Mahendra
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bali
Bikes: Dahon Dash P18, Dahon Dash Altena, Bannard Sunny.
Posts: 1,375
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 458 Post(s)
19-113 gear-iches on tap

Quote:
Originally Posted by avole View Post
...a large gear range is a virtual must...

The bike may have other limitations, but gearing (19-113GI) is not one of them. And it is a folding bike.
Abu Mahendra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-18, 02:43 AM   #87
avole
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: France
Bikes: Brompton, Time, Bianchi, Jan Janssen, Peugeot
Posts: 239
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 142 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by linberl View Post
I'm curious. Is the brompton the only folding bike you have toured with? Or are there other folders you have toured with (which ones)?
Interesting and sad you had to ask this.

In fact I tried all the folding bikes in two bicycle shops, but they failed at the first hurdle, the fold. If they didn't fold to the same size as the Brompton, they weren't going to fit in the cupboard where they would be kept, and none did. In fact, some when folded weren't that much smaller than a few of the normal bikes in the shop, which led me to wonder what purpose they were meant to serve. I'd almost given up when one shop owner showed me a picture of a folder that looked like it filled the bill ...

Don't ask me what brands, by the way. Some were Dahons I think, others might have been produced locally.
avole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-18, 05:53 AM   #88
tds101 
Grumpy old man,...
 
tds101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Mastic Beach, NY
Bikes: 7+,...
Posts: 2,186
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 326 Post(s)
How about this?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg maxresdefault.jpg (207.1 KB, 90 views)
__________________
If it wasn't for you meddling kids,...


Last edited by tds101; 02-11-18 at 05:58 AM.
tds101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-18, 10:20 AM   #89
linberl
Senior Member
 
linberl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: SF Bay Area
Bikes: 2003 Bike Friday (restored & sold: 1997 Trek 720, 1993 Trek 520)
Posts: 1,448
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 523 Post(s)
My guess is they were all bikes that had hinges in the main frame. You might reconsider if you ever got your hands on a Birdy or a BF...in terms of the ride. The REAL compromise is that you give up a bit of compactness to get a ride equivalent to a traditional bike, but the bike still folds and is easier to travel with than a non-folding bike. And, actually, the Birdy folds down quite compactly and still has a great ride with full suspension. You don't find them sitting in dealer stores, though. Maybe your expectations for the size of your cupboard are unrealistic, lol.
linberl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-18, 12:33 PM   #90
avole
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: France
Bikes: Brompton, Time, Bianchi, Jan Janssen, Peugeot
Posts: 239
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 142 Post(s)
No, I found a bike.

LOL.
avole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-18, 03:44 AM   #91
Bonzo Banana
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 359
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 125 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tds101 View Post
How about this?
That's an image that looks like it has a story beyond it with that bull looking straight at the cyclist.

The limited storage capacity doesn't compare to a full size standard bicycle.

Bonzo Banana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-18, 04:15 AM   #92
berlinonaut
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 299
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 135 Post(s)
Oh, and these are folders:





Obviously they have limited luggage capacity in comparison to the full size that Bonzo posted...

Regarding the monocycle: It does not fold and has a big wheel - thus it is perfectly suited as a touring bike.
berlinonaut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-18, 07:29 AM   #93
tds101 
Grumpy old man,...
 
tds101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Mastic Beach, NY
Bikes: 7+,...
Posts: 2,186
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 326 Post(s)
This is also a non-compromising folder,...I just haven't had the urge to tour.

__________________
If it wasn't for you meddling kids,...

tds101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-18, 12:19 PM   #94
reppans
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: New England
Bikes: Brompton M6R, Specialized Tricross Comp, Ellsworth Isis, Dahon Speed P8
Posts: 593
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 225 Post(s)
reppans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-18, 06:52 PM   #95
edelay
Senior Member
 
edelay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Bikes: Dahon Curve D8 (Sturmey Archer X-RF8), Crius Smart 3.0 5 speed
Posts: 281
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by berlinonaut View Post
I wondered the same thing and fitted one myself. The 8-gear hub that I haed in my steel Brommi was the S/A XRF8w. In theory it sounded like a very good idea, the practice turned out to be different, at least for my taste. Weight is one thing (and a big one), drag is another (also a big one). The third was the shifting. It turned out that the XRF8w needed constant adjustment (and I mean constant!) and quite reliably often missed a gear while riding. Especially the sixth often did not make it. Furthermore it eats shifting cables for breakfast, becoming totally unreliable once it has eaten another one every couple of months. I have another XRF8w in a 20" bike that shows the same behaviour in every aspect, thus it seems not to be a single-hub-event. So from today's perspective I would not buy the hub again and can understand why Brompton did not go down that route.

I've ridden (but not owned) Bromptons that were fitted with a Shimano Nexus premium. Much, much better. Fitting is more complicated and the weight is more or less in the same ballpark. But it has less drag and shifting works totally reliably.
If you still want the S/A 8-speed in your Brompton: There is a kit from Ben Cooper/Kinetics or you can buy the Hub from i.e. SJS and do the rest yourself.
It is funny, I have used both a Nexus 8 and a Sturmey Archer X-RF8w and agree with you. I remember adjusting the Nexus 8
once over 4 or 5 years. The X-RF8, I've just put in my 2nd cable in 6 months. Now granted a cable is cheap and easy to install. The friction and noise of the X-RF8 still bothers me but both have reduced a bit since I've racked up over 5000 kms on it.
edelay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-18, 08:08 PM   #96
Abu Mahendra
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bali
Bikes: Dahon Dash P18, Dahon Dash Altena, Bannard Sunny.
Posts: 1,375
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 458 Post(s)
Apropos IGH...

i am in the midst of building my Bali Bambu 26er. The frame has horizontal dropouts so I got to thinking about lacing up a wheel with an IGH. Problem is i font know which IGH meets my requirements:
1. Not insanely heavy
2. Not insanely expensive
3. Range of at least a 11-36 cogset
4. Smooth shifting
5. Efficient, not draggy or friction prone
6. relatively Maintainance free
7. takes disk rotors
8. black color
does such a thing exist?

Quote:
Originally Posted by edelay View Post
It is funny, I have used both a Nexus 8 and a Sturmey Archer X-RF8w and agree with you. I remember adjusting the Nexus 8
once over 4 or 5 years. The X-RF8, I've just put in my 2nd cable in 6 months. Now granted a cable is cheap and easy to install. The friction and noise of the X-RF8 still bothers me but both have reduced a bit since I've racked up over 5000 kms on it.
Abu Mahendra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-18, 09:19 PM   #97
edelay
Senior Member
 
edelay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Bikes: Dahon Curve D8 (Sturmey Archer X-RF8), Crius Smart 3.0 5 speed
Posts: 281
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abu Mahendra View Post
i am in the midst of building my Bali Bambu 26er. The frame has horizontal dropouts so I got to thinking about lacing up a wheel with an IGH. Problem is i font know which IGH meets my requirements:
1. Not insanely heavy
2. Not insanely expensive
3. Range of at least a 11-36 cogset
4. Smooth shifting
5. Efficient, not draggy or friction prone
6. relatively Maintainance free
7. takes disk rotors
8. black color
does such a thing exist?
You must have seen my Shimano Nexus 8 (SG-8R30) vs Sturmey Archer 8 (x-rf8w) vs SRAM i-Motion 3 post last year
https://www.bikeforums.net/19384942-post6.html

The Nexus was my clear favorite and I think it meets all of your conditions above, except that model I had weighed 2 kg.

I have a Sturmey Archer S-RF5 (w) on my Crius. It isn't made anymore but you can still source them. I haven't put enough km's on it to recommend it or not. Quiet and low friction. Perhaps the shifting isn't the smoothest. There are newer models, but I don't have any experience with them.
edelay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-18, 09:58 PM   #98
Abu Mahendra
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bali
Bikes: Dahon Dash P18, Dahon Dash Altena, Bannard Sunny.
Posts: 1,375
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 458 Post(s)
Thanks...

My LBS has the Alfine 8 at 1,680 grams (claimed). I am thinking this laced up with Surly Rabbit Hole rims...

Quote:
Originally Posted by edelay View Post
You must have seen my Shimano Nexus 8 (SG-8R30) vs Sturmey Archer 8 (x-rf8w) vs SRAM i-Motion 3 post last year
https://www.bikeforums.net/19384942-post6.html

The Nexus was my clear favorite and I think it meets all of your conditions above, except that model I had weighed 2 kg.

I have a Sturmey Archer S-RF5 (w) on my Crius. It isn't made anymore but you can still source them. I haven't put enough km's on it to recommend it or not. Quiet and low friction. Perhaps the shifting isn't the smoothest. There are newer models, but I don't have any experience with them.
Abu Mahendra is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:33 PM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION