Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Folding Bikes
Reload this Page >

Folding bike as a touring bike?

Folding Bikes Discuss the unique features and issues of folding bikes. Also a great place to learn what folding bike will work best for your needs.

Folding bike as a touring bike?

Reply

Old 05-06-18, 12:10 AM
  #26  
Serenity Yee
Senior Member
 
Serenity Yee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 69
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Exactly. Comfort is key. Well, that goes with any bike but this is for the long run. To and fro.
Serenity Yee is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-18, 12:41 AM
  #27  
Abu Mahendra
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bali
Posts: 2,164

Bikes: In service - Bannard Sunny minivelo, Dahon Dash Altena folder. Several others in construction or temporarily decommissioned.

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 836 Post(s)
Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
my beef is limited option for handlebar.

wouldnt want to go long distance on flat bar.
you can install any bar you want on a folder. Lots of people tour on flat bars no problem. I myself have done exactly that.

Last edited by Abu Mahendra; 05-06-18 at 06:57 PM.
Abu Mahendra is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-18, 08:59 AM
  #28  
reppans
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 741

Bikes: Brompton M6R, Specialized Tricross Comp, Ellsworth Isis, Dahon Speed P8

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 297 Post(s)
The handlebar point is an important one - I like the ability to vary both grip position and lean angle for both comfort and aerodynamics. Handlebar mods often impact the fold, so may or may not be an issue depending upon how often you fold. Bar ends are an easy fix for grip variety, but do little to change lean angle/aerodynamics. My Dahon's quick release telescopic steering stem doesn't do it for me as I'm constantly changing riding position depending on road incline and wind direction. I have Ergon GP2s, but for me personally, rigging a drop/aero postion in my Brompton M bars made the single biggest difference in narrowing the pace and comfort gap to my gravel bike - enough so that I'm now indifferent to riding either on pure exercise loops. Next time around, I think I'll go with the Brompton P bars - that seems like the best compromise between a good fold and a comfortable/aerodynamic tourer - screw the aesthetics All that said, it's hard to beat how drop bars have good access to brakes/shifters from multiple grip positions and lean angles.




reppans is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-18, 10:59 AM
  #29  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 4,954

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 899 Post(s)
You can see from my photos in post 23 above that I have drop bars on my folder.

But if there is something about your particular bike that would prevent you from installing drop bars, perhaps these could be an option? I have never actually seen these, only photos.
https://www.amazon.com/Origin8-33617.../dp/B0013G6PB8

And if you wanted to ride on the hoods but did not want to change brake levers, these could be added.
https://www.amazon.com/Cane-Creek-St.../dp/B000ZTNXDW
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-18, 07:22 PM
  #30  
pinholecam
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 309
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 114 Post(s)
Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
my beef is limited option for handlebar.

wouldnt want to go long distance on flat bar.
For me, flat bars are fine with Ergon3 grips.
They give enough variation in hand positions to not feel sore over many hours/days of riding.
In fact, they are the most comfortable compared to my Tri and road bike setups.
The only big ding against them is that there is no going lower against a headwind.
pinholecam is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-18, 07:31 PM
  #31  
Abu Mahendra
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bali
Posts: 2,164

Bikes: In service - Bannard Sunny minivelo, Dahon Dash Altena folder. Several others in construction or temporarily decommissioned.

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 836 Post(s)
Yeap, Ergon GP3's the ticket...






Originally Posted by pinholecam View Post
For me, flat bars are fine with Ergon3 grips.
They give enough variation in hand positions to not feel sore over many hours/days of riding.
In fact, they are the most comfortable compared to my Tri and road bike setups.
The only big ding against them is that there is no going lower against a headwind.
Abu Mahendra is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-18, 09:18 AM
  #32  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
 
mtb_addict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,686
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1825 Post(s)
Originally Posted by pinholecam View Post
For me, flat bars are fine with Ergon3 grips.
They give enough variation in hand positions to not feel sore over many hours/days of riding.
In fact, they are the most comfortable compared to my Tri and road bike setups.
The only big ding against them is that there is no going lower against a headwind.
Wish can put a brake lever on bar ends, as well as the normal position. ( 4 levers)

Last edited by mtb_addict; 05-08-18 at 10:35 AM.
mtb_addict is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-18, 11:35 AM
  #33  
avole
Logic free zone
 
avole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: France
Posts: 557

Bikes: Brompton, Time, Bianchi, Jan Janssen, Peugeot

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 321 Post(s)
To get back to the OP, yes, you can tour with a folding bike. The advantage is in being able to take it with you in any train or bus. On the road, you simply cannot beat a full-size road bike for comfort, speed, and weight carrying ability, not to mention slogging up those pesky hills.
avole is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-18, 10:58 AM
  #34  
Paul Braithwait
Senior Member
 
Paul Braithwait's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Carlisle, in England's Lake District, just a few miles south of the border with Scotland.
Posts: 319

Bikes: A Bianchi C2C road bike, a steel framed touring bike and a Xootr Swift folder which has made the rest redundant!

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
You can see from my photos in post 23 above that I have drop bars on my folder.

But if there is something about your particular bike that would prevent you from installing drop bars, perhaps these could be an option? I have never actually seen these, only photos.
https://www.amazon.com/Origin8-33617-Drop-Ends/dp/B0013G6PB8

I had these on my Xootr Swift for a while but they are not as comfortable as proper drop 'bars.



And if you wanted to ride on the hoods but did not want to change brake levers, these could be added.
https://www.amazon.com/Cane-Creek-St.../dp/B000ZTNXDW




Paul Braithwait is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-18, 09:24 AM
  #35  
larry_too
Dahon Mariner ?
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Northern Virginia/DelMarVa
Posts: 16

Bikes: Dahon Mariner 26" Wheel 21 speed. Trek 830 and Series 3.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
New here and don't really know what I have. It is a 26" wheel 21 speed Dehon, marked a Mariner but looks more like an Expresso without the fancy folding stem or folding pedals.
Told that it had an original list at $700 though I didn't pay that much.
If someone can explain how to add a picture here, I have a couple

Larry
larry_too is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-18, 05:31 PM
  #36  
pinholecam
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 309
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 114 Post(s)
Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
Wish can put a brake lever on bar ends, as well as the normal position. ( 4 levers)
You can actually thread a Mtb trigger shifter into a thinner diameter fixie road bar.

XT Trigger shifter on road bar by jenkwang, on Flickr
Then add road style brakes.

​​
20170106-DSC02623 by jenkwang, on Flickr

You can find plenty of such bars on Taobao or ebay.
Just make sure that the angle of the bend is not too acute too as it will prevent the mtb shift from threading thru

Last edited by pinholecam; 05-15-18 at 05:31 PM.
pinholecam is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-18, 09:48 AM
  #37  
CanadaWriter
Senior Member
 
CanadaWriter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 68

Bikes: Dahon Boardwalk D8

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Abu Mahendra View Post
It was my daily driver, toured with it in Taiwan a few weeks ago...
Dude that's Taroko! Fantastic! Did you do the East Coast?
CanadaWriter is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-18, 03:28 PM
  #38  
larry_too
Dahon Mariner ?
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Northern Virginia/DelMarVa
Posts: 16

Bikes: Dahon Mariner 26" Wheel 21 speed. Trek 830 and Series 3.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Interesting,
Wonder haw many more are required?
larry_too is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-18, 05:33 PM
  #39  
Abu Mahendra
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bali
Posts: 2,164

Bikes: In service - Bannard Sunny minivelo, Dahon Dash Altena folder. Several others in construction or temporarily decommissioned.

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 836 Post(s)
Originally Posted by CanadaWriter View Post
Dude that's Taroko! Fantastic! Did you do the East Coast?
You got it, dude! That's the wondrous Taroko Gorge alright. So is this...



​​​​Yes, i cycled from Taipei to Taitung via the Northern Cross Highway and the East Rift Valley on the East Coast. Loved Taiwan, and hope to return soon.
Abu Mahendra is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-18, 08:27 PM
  #40  
CanadaWriter
Senior Member
 
CanadaWriter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 68

Bikes: Dahon Boardwalk D8

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Abu Mahendra View Post
i cycled from Taipei to Taitung via the Northern Cross Highway and the East Rift Valley on the East Coast. Loved Taiwan, and hope to return soon.


Same! This is just before the bridge to Yuli (about halfway between Taitung and Hualien) with that sign that shows how you're between the Philippine and Eurasian plate.
CanadaWriter is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-18, 09:42 PM
  #41  
SparkyBeacon 
Tourer
 
SparkyBeacon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 54

Bikes: Birdy folder, Bike Friday, Burley tandem, Nishiki fixie conversion, Dahon "Coca-Cola" Speed P8

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
42 gears

Originally Posted by travelinhobo View Post
Thanks for all the replies. I ha be no idea what all those numbers mean, but I'll learn when I get into this. I did notice on the bike pics that gears are lmtd. with only one cog in the front. I need gears.
I tour on a Bike Friday New World Tourist. It originally had 21 gears. I wanted even lower gears because I want to be able to pedal the loaded bike up steep hills. I added a chain ring and now I have 42 gears; some are really low.

This is my bike at the end of a week on the C&O Canal Trail. I did not really need low gears on this trip.


Bike Friday New World Tourist, 42 gears
SparkyBeacon is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-18, 10:20 PM
  #42  
2_i 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 2,140

Bikes: Trek 730, Bike Friday NWT, Brompton M6R*2, Trek 830, Trek 720, Dahon HAT060, Dahon HT060,...

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 240 Post(s)
Originally Posted by SparkyBeacon View Post
I tour on a Bike Friday New World Tourist. It originally had 21 gears. I wanted even lower gears because I want to be able to pedal the loaded bike up steep hills. I added a chain ring and now I have 42 gears; some are really low.
So where did you add the ring to have 42? On my full size bike I used to have 36 and went down to 32 and I thought this was a lot. On the low end I go below fat bikes.
2_i is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-18, 11:06 PM
  #43  
Abu Mahendra
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bali
Posts: 2,164

Bikes: In service - Bannard Sunny minivelo, Dahon Dash Altena folder. Several others in construction or temporarily decommissioned.

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 836 Post(s)
Originally Posted by CanadaWriter View Post


Same! This is just before the bridge to Yuli (about halfway between Taitung and Hualien) with that sign that shows how you're between the Philippine and Eurasian plate.
You mean, this place?


Last edited by Abu Mahendra; 05-15-18 at 11:11 PM.
Abu Mahendra is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-18, 05:49 AM
  #44  
SparkyBeacon 
Tourer
 
SparkyBeacon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 54

Bikes: Birdy folder, Bike Friday, Burley tandem, Nishiki fixie conversion, Dahon "Coca-Cola" Speed P8

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
42 gears

Originally Posted by 2_i View Post
So where did you add the ring to have 42? On my full size bike I used to have 36 and went down to 32 and I thought this was a lot. On the low end I go below fat bikes.
This bike has a common setup that Bike Friday used to use. The gearing is the Sachs/SRAM 3x7 for 21 gears. This system has a 3-speed rear hub with internal gears. There was a single front chain ring. I added a second smaller chain ring for a lower gear range.

There is no front derailleur. I normally stick with one gear range for a ride, but it is not difficult to move the chain when stopped.
SparkyBeacon is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-18, 06:53 AM
  #45  
larry_too
Dahon Mariner ?
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Northern Virginia/DelMarVa
Posts: 16

Bikes: Dahon Mariner 26" Wheel 21 speed. Trek 830 and Series 3.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
five

Guess that is how.
larry_too is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-18, 06:54 AM
  #46  
larry_too
Dahon Mariner ?
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Northern Virginia/DelMarVa
Posts: 16

Bikes: Dahon Mariner 26" Wheel 21 speed. Trek 830 and Series 3.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
six

I know, I know, but how else?
larry_too is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-18, 06:55 AM
  #47  
larry_too
Dahon Mariner ?
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Northern Virginia/DelMarVa
Posts: 16

Bikes: Dahon Mariner 26" Wheel 21 speed. Trek 830 and Series 3.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
seven

Only three to go
larry_too is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-18, 06:56 AM
  #48  
larry_too
Dahon Mariner ?
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Northern Virginia/DelMarVa
Posts: 16

Bikes: Dahon Mariner 26" Wheel 21 speed. Trek 830 and Series 3.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
eight

Almost done!
larry_too is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-18, 09:23 AM
  #49  
CanadaWriter
Senior Member
 
CanadaWriter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 68

Bikes: Dahon Boardwalk D8

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
That's it. You had a sunnier day than me. That town Yuli was...not the greatest to spend the night in, although the AirBnB was cheap. That's one great ride though.
CanadaWriter is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-18, 09:51 AM
  #50  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 4,954

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 899 Post(s)
Originally Posted by SparkyBeacon View Post
This bike has a common setup that Bike Friday used to use. The gearing is the Sachs/SRAM 3x7 for 21 gears. This system has a 3-speed rear hub with internal gears. There was a single front chain ring. I added a second smaller chain ring for a lower gear range.

There is no front derailleur. I normally stick with one gear range for a ride, but it is not difficult to move the chain when stopped.
I should think about that. On my folder I have a Sram Dual Drive with an eight speed cassette for 24 speeds, I used the Dual Drive because I can't fit a front derailleur. Before I got the Dual Drive, I tried a double crank but got tired of having a greasy finger to manually change gears, so I went back to a single when I bought the Dual Drive. But there have been a few times I wished I had wider gearing. I have a derailleur cage long enough that I could fit that double crank again.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service