Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Folding Bikes
Reload this Page >

Vilano Urbana Single Speed Folding Bike

Folding Bikes Discuss the unique features and issues of folding bikes. Also a great place to learn what folding bike will work best for your needs.

Vilano Urbana Single Speed Folding Bike

Reply

Old 05-08-18, 03:56 PM
  #1  
mirfi
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mirfi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 201

Bikes: DownTube FS9, Montaque paratrooper, Nano mini-velo, Motobecane CX, Raleigh 20, MIFA folder, ROG Pony

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Vilano Urbana Single Speed Folding Bike

Hello All, bought a Vilano Urbana from Walmart((RoadBikeOutlet). $199. Arrived today. Initial findings.

Seat post 31.8 FU FENG, seat tube has sleeve in it. Contacted customer service for size without shim.
Tires INNOVA (47-406) 20x1.75 35PSI 240K 2.5BAR
Prowheel crankset 170.
Crank 52t Cog 16t Gear inches 60.7
No name folding pedals, expect to last a couple hundred miles.
Packaged nicely, lot of tape, foam, zip ties, cardboard.
Reflectors for front, for rear and one on each wheel.
28 spoke wheel, look like steel.
Has three threaded holes on each side of rear frame for rack/fender.
Threaded hole in fork for fender mount.
Two threaded holes on top tube for bottle holder.
Extra two foot long Velcro strap excellent for holding folded bike together.
Quick Release on seat post, fold, handlebar stem and handlebar height.
Everything is tight, except seat post tube which is incredibly loose.
Tires needed American air, they flat donít care, will be upgraded soon to 65psi wheels.
Bike needs to be disassembled and greased.
Rear hub is too tight. With bike upside down, cranked pedals until rear wheel was spinning fast, on its own it slowed down quickly and stopped. i.e. NO RIDING until greased and adjusted.

Unloosened rear lug nut to adjust coaster brake, needed a three foot breaker bar, also needed it on nut adjusting brake.

Unloosened the threaded headset (25,4mm?), needed a one foot pipe on end of long hex key.

What is going on with this "new" forum? My PC, (Win7) is struggling with everything, including text formatting.

Pictures, more info to follow.
mirfi is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-18, 08:33 AM
  #2  
Bonzo Banana
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Merry Old England
Posts: 586

Bikes: Muddyfox Evolve 200, Bicycles4u Paris Explorer, Raleigh Twenty Stowaway, Bickerton California, Saracen Xile, Kona Hoss Deluxe, Vertigo Carnaby, Exodus Havoc, Kona Lanai, Revolution Cuillin Sport, Dawes Kingpin, Bickerton, NSU & Elswick Cosmopolitan

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 215 Post(s)
Interested to hear how it rides compared to your other compact and folding bikes.
Bonzo Banana is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-18, 02:23 PM
  #3  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
 
mtb_addict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,836
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1974 Post(s)
I've always been intrigued by the Urbana's extreme light weight.
Cuz my Boardwalk S1 is like 30 pounds (8 pounds heavier than the Urbana).
I'd like to hear how durable the frame is.
That would be my main concern.
mtb_addict is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-18, 03:29 PM
  #4  
Bonzo Banana
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Merry Old England
Posts: 586

Bikes: Muddyfox Evolve 200, Bicycles4u Paris Explorer, Raleigh Twenty Stowaway, Bickerton California, Saracen Xile, Kona Hoss Deluxe, Vertigo Carnaby, Exodus Havoc, Kona Lanai, Revolution Cuillin Sport, Dawes Kingpin, Bickerton, NSU & Elswick Cosmopolitan

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 215 Post(s)
Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
I've always been intrigued by the Urbana's extreme light weight.
Cuz my Boardwalk S1 is like 30 pounds (8 pounds heavier than the Urbana).
I'd like to hear how durable the frame is.
That would be my main concern.
8lbs heavier is a significant difference I'm assuming that is steel and likely a basic high tensile steel frame. There is so few components on single speed bikes that the frames make up a more significant part of the overall weight. I don't have a problem with the weight difference, likely stronger, more long lasting and the extra weight is a better workout getting it up the hills.
Bonzo Banana is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-18, 05:17 PM
  #5  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
 
mtb_addict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,836
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1974 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Bonzo Banana View Post
8lbs heavier is a significant difference I'm assuming that is steel and likely a basic high tensile steel frame. There is so few components on single speed bikes that the frames make up a more significant part of the overall weight. I don't have a problem with the weight difference, likely stronger, more long lasting and the extra weight is a better workout getting it up the hills.
My bad...Dahon says my hi-ten Boardwalk S1 is only 28 pounds. If the Urbana is really 22 pounds...then it's 6 pounds lighter than mine. Still impressive engineering achievement for a $200 bike. My Boardwalk was $300.

That extra 6 pounds is huge, when you are lifting it into a trunk of a small car! Or carryinhg up a flight of stairs.

Last edited by mtb_addict; 05-09-18 at 05:21 PM.
mtb_addict is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-18, 01:53 AM
  #6  
Bonzo Banana
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Merry Old England
Posts: 586

Bikes: Muddyfox Evolve 200, Bicycles4u Paris Explorer, Raleigh Twenty Stowaway, Bickerton California, Saracen Xile, Kona Hoss Deluxe, Vertigo Carnaby, Exodus Havoc, Kona Lanai, Revolution Cuillin Sport, Dawes Kingpin, Bickerton, NSU & Elswick Cosmopolitan

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 215 Post(s)
I guess its an impressively low weight but with so little fitted to the bike and an aluminium frame it was never going to be heavy. Decathlon do a basic Hoptown/Tilt folding bike with steel frame. I think with gears its 15-16kg but is down to 12-13kg in single speed. So that's a 2-3kg loss approx and if you apply that to many aluminium geared folding bikes which are at 12-13kg you can get down to close or below 10kg. The Urbana sheds the weight of brake levers, brake cables, brake calipers, derailleur, cogset, gear shifter, gear cable and many other sundry parts like rear rack, mudguards and kickstand. The only weight it adds over a conventional geared folding bike is the coaster brake rear hub. The only way you could go much lower is perhaps make the bike fixed gear and maybe run the tyres tubeless unless you start changing components for lower weight parts llike handlebars, seatpost etc.

It seems all the low weight benefits of the Dahon by removing all those gearing parts has been nullified by the use of a heavy high tensile steel frame.
Bonzo Banana is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-18, 07:37 AM
  #7  
mirfi
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mirfi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 201

Bikes: DownTube FS9, Montaque paratrooper, Nano mini-velo, Motobecane CX, Raleigh 20, MIFA folder, ROG Pony

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Hello,
Apologize for lack of photos, (new phone, old brain).

The headset (NECO 842-2) had a film of oil, steerer had zero grease/oil.

The handlebar height adjustment is kinda flimsy but functional (RoadBikesOutlet has an instructional).

Seatpost is 31.8, but seat tube has a shim(?), without the shim I measured 34mm (with a ruler, will follow up with micrometer), so that would be close to the DAHON/Tern 33.9. I'm interested because I will upgrading to a longer post and would prefer without shim.

BTW, the bike in the gray color looks great, really nice finish and the fold locks really tight.

Yesterday evening I took it for first ride, YAY!! it stops and brakes fine, but after about 20-40 feet(?) I really noticed the rear bearings grinding. Oh well.

I sent an email to customercare, so we will see how that goes.

Saw some YouTube videos from EsquireBiker and one had rear wheel issues
mirfi is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-18, 08:11 AM
  #8  
Schwinnsta
Schwinnasaur
 
Schwinnsta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 791
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 104 Post(s)
Thanks for the review. Hope things turn out OK.
Schwinnsta is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-18, 08:43 AM
  #9  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
 
mtb_addict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,836
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1974 Post(s)
I would pull the coaster hub apart and see whats going on in there.

Even if the dealer send you another, you ought to open it up and check for grease and adjust the bearing.
The lock nut on the adjusting cone might be loose or something.
mtb_addict is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-18, 11:34 AM
  #10  
mirfi
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mirfi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 201

Bikes: DownTube FS9, Montaque paratrooper, Nano mini-velo, Motobecane CX, Raleigh 20, MIFA folder, ROG Pony

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Update : Called customer care, supplied my order information details, discussed issue. Real professionals. Being sent a replacement wheel.

A product is only as good as the support team. They are grading at five star plus for me right now.

And mtb addict, yes, I will take apart, just didn't want to in case they wanted it back. My guess is the race(s) are damaged.
mirfi is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-18, 01:10 PM
  #11  
mirfi
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mirfi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 201

Bikes: DownTube FS9, Montaque paratrooper, Nano mini-velo, Motobecane CX, Raleigh 20, MIFA folder, ROG Pony

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)


Yep, 21.5 lbs


Just out of the box, cardboard is hiding wheel reflector.
Had time to load pictures; one shows the high tech scale that confirms the weight 21.5 lbs. The other shows the very nice looking bike.
mirfi is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-18, 02:01 PM
  #12  
Bonzo Banana
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Merry Old England
Posts: 586

Bikes: Muddyfox Evolve 200, Bicycles4u Paris Explorer, Raleigh Twenty Stowaway, Bickerton California, Saracen Xile, Kona Hoss Deluxe, Vertigo Carnaby, Exodus Havoc, Kona Lanai, Revolution Cuillin Sport, Dawes Kingpin, Bickerton, NSU & Elswick Cosmopolitan

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 215 Post(s)
I reckon if they are quick to send out a replacement wheel it could be a common issue especially in light of that youtube video.
Bonzo Banana is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-18, 04:28 PM
  #13  
mirfi
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mirfi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 201

Bikes: DownTube FS9, Montaque paratrooper, Nano mini-velo, Motobecane CX, Raleigh 20, MIFA folder, ROG Pony

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
The arm of the old rear wheel is stamped POWER LC-101R
mirfi is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-18, 09:54 AM
  #14  
mirfi
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mirfi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 201

Bikes: DownTube FS9, Montaque paratrooper, Nano mini-velo, Motobecane CX, Raleigh 20, MIFA folder, ROG Pony

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
All, more updates. Been out of town/work..

1. Customercare sent me a new rear wheel. It's a little 'sticky' and tight, backed bearing off 1/4 turn, will be testing later. Note: I had recently uncovered some ancient rusted department store 20" wheels from a Cinderella bike in the back of my shed, tire held air so I have been riding Urbana with one of those.

2. Needed seatpost to be taller, didn't see any thing I like on the market. So, I cut the 'sphincter' (bottom?) off the end of the seat post (left the saddle end on). and found a 28.6 post would fit in it, but also realized it is 16 gauge metal. A little thin for my hugeness.

Note, old seatpost is 'welded' so it has a noticeable internal seam.

Raleigh Tube 28.6(1.126, 1-1/8) fits inside Urbana Tube 31.8(1.252, 1-1/4), that means the Urbana tube wall is 1/16, (.06) inch thick or 16 gauge

Decided to go with a thicker walled tube. Went to a local Metal Superstore with my bike and the three current seatposts I had lying about.

27.2 mm = 1.07inch = 1 1/16
28.6 mm = 1.125984 = 1 1/8
31.8 mm = 1.252 = 1 1/4

What I (and people there) found was that a 1 1/4" pipe that had .095 thick walls, could accommodate a 27.2" seatpost.

New seatpost vs old seatpost, both are 1.25 inch, note how much thicker the one on the left is.



27.2 fits in new pipe added cuts and clamp. 28.6 (or 27.2 with an old shim I had) fits in end of previous seatpost.

anybody know how/where to 'fix' my fonts(?!).

Pipe is steel and heavy, but only cost me $2, maybe after next trip I'll look for aluminum.


3. Upgraded to Kenda 406x1.75 60PSI tires, the white ones were like $12 a piece.





Could say I had a good day on the bike.

Next upgrade will be replacing front quill stem (25.4mm) with goose neck type and putting on Hi-Rise handlebars (IMO they are much more adjustable and fold away).
mirfi is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-18, 06:29 AM
  #15  
mirfi
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mirfi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 201

Bikes: DownTube FS9, Montaque paratrooper, Nano mini-velo, Motobecane CX, Raleigh 20, MIFA folder, ROG Pony

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)


Enjoying morning ride.
Took Urban on first vacation. Added ding-ding bell, drink holder, basket rack. Very pleased.
mirfi is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-18, 05:02 PM
  #16  
Bonzo Banana
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Merry Old England
Posts: 586

Bikes: Muddyfox Evolve 200, Bicycles4u Paris Explorer, Raleigh Twenty Stowaway, Bickerton California, Saracen Xile, Kona Hoss Deluxe, Vertigo Carnaby, Exodus Havoc, Kona Lanai, Revolution Cuillin Sport, Dawes Kingpin, Bickerton, NSU & Elswick Cosmopolitan

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 215 Post(s)
That bike didn't stay long at original spec. Certainly looks an interesting result. I personally wouldn't like to go down a steep hill relying 100% on that coaster brake especially as it seems to have quality issues. Remember its not just yourself but any pedestrians that could be effected if the coaster brake fails. Those Kenda tyres look nice.
Bonzo Banana is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-18, 05:20 PM
  #17  
mirfi
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mirfi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 201

Bikes: DownTube FS9, Montaque paratrooper, Nano mini-velo, Motobecane CX, Raleigh 20, MIFA folder, ROG Pony

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Bonzo Banana View Post
I personally wouldn't like to go down a steep hill relying 100% on that coaster brake especially as it seems to have quality issues. Remember its not just yourself but any pedestrians that could be effected if the coaster brake fails.
This past week I probably spent 10 hours total on it in Ocean City, Maryland. Was doing slow leisurely rides on the boardwalk and the flat roads. Pretty much what I planned for this bike(and to be easily broken down for plane travel to beach destinations). I hope to never take this bike up or down a steep hill. That being said, using a pedal brake and no front/hand brake was a bit disconcerting. I can see a front brake in the future.
mirfi is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-18, 01:34 PM
  #18  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
 
mtb_addict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,836
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1974 Post(s)
Nah. Unless it's down a mountain. The coaster brake alone is sufficient. Properly maintainence your chain always. SS chains are beefy tough.
mtb_addict is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-18, 06:23 AM
  #19  
Bonzo Banana
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Merry Old England
Posts: 586

Bikes: Muddyfox Evolve 200, Bicycles4u Paris Explorer, Raleigh Twenty Stowaway, Bickerton California, Saracen Xile, Kona Hoss Deluxe, Vertigo Carnaby, Exodus Havoc, Kona Lanai, Revolution Cuillin Sport, Dawes Kingpin, Bickerton, NSU & Elswick Cosmopolitan

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 215 Post(s)
Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
Nah. Unless it's down a mountain. The coaster brake alone is sufficient. Properly maintainence your chain always. SS chains are beefy tough.
It is illegal in many countries to have a bicycle with only one brake and use it on the road. The only exception may be a fixed gear where they accept the fixed gear drivetrain could be considered a brake so you only need a front brake in addition to that. Like most things though Police have more important things to deal with so it isn't always policed and I think here in the UK it would be rare for the Police to stop such a cyclist although the recent case where a woman was killed might make stopping cyclists more likely. To my mind a coaster brake is less effective than a fixed gear bike with regard braking because if the coaster brake mechanism fails you have no way of stopping where as a fixed gear bike doesn't have such a mechanism to fail and the rider dictates the cadence. However I think the main issue for either is the chain breaking in use which instantly removes all braking and while SS chains are more beefy in general they also have much heavier demands placed on them.

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeands...-of-pedestrian
Bonzo Banana is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-18, 07:00 AM
  #20  
Schwinnsta
Schwinnasaur
 
Schwinnsta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 791
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 104 Post(s)
Generations grew up here riding bikes only with coaster brakes. The bikes were heavy but not many knew that. I found freedom and broader horizons on mine.
Schwinnsta is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-18, 09:32 AM
  #21  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
 
mtb_addict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,836
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1974 Post(s)
@Bonzo Banana The parts of coaster hub brake is so robust. I don't see any way it can fail under normal use.

Fixie hubs on the other hand...looks like the cog could loosen and backout danger if not install carefully.
mtb_addict is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-18, 01:07 PM
  #22  
DLBroox
Senior Member
 
DLBroox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Miami, FL
Posts: 944

Bikes: Bianchi San Jose, Dahon Mu Uno

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 86 Post(s)
I have a Mu Uno with a coaster brake and a front brake. I never use the coaster brake. I actually really dislike it to the point of maybe replacing the wheel.
DLBroox is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-18, 03:50 PM
  #23  
tds101 
Grumpy old man,...
 
tds101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Mastic Beach, NY
Posts: 2,532

Bikes: 7+,...

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 441 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Bonzo Banana View Post
It is illegal in many countries to have a bicycle with only one brake and use it on the road. The only exception may be a fixed gear where they accept the fixed gear drivetrain could be considered a brake so you only need a front brake in addition to that. Like most things though Police have more important things to deal with so it isn't always policed and I think here in the UK it would be rare for the Police to stop such a cyclist although the recent case where a woman was killed might make stopping cyclists more likely. To my mind a coaster brake is less effective than a fixed gear bike with regard braking because if the coaster brake mechanism fails you have no way of stopping where as a fixed gear bike doesn't have such a mechanism to fail and the rider dictates the cadence. However I think the main issue for either is the chain breaking in use which instantly removes all braking and while SS chains are more beefy in general they also have much heavier demands placed on them.

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeands...-of-pedestrian
In the USA, which is where the OP is from, having ONLY a coaster brake is 100% legal. How would I know? I'm also in the USA. For world travel it might be different, but we have no such laws in place.

Personally I prefer hand brakes myself,...but I do have a 3 speed with a coaster brake. It's for slower speed, flat ground rides. Hills (big ones) aren't recommended for a coaster brake. It tends to overheat and fail.
__________________
If it wasn't for you meddling kids,...
tds101 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-18, 07:29 PM
  #24  
mirfi
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mirfi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 201

Bikes: DownTube FS9, Montaque paratrooper, Nano mini-velo, Motobecane CX, Raleigh 20, MIFA folder, ROG Pony

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
When I was 12 in1968 nearly all the bikes just had coaster brakes. Especially the ubiquitous 'stngray' style; 20inch tires, banana seat, hi-rise handlebars.

BTW, A cool thing to do and to impress your friends was to go real fast and do a hard sideways skid slide. Wasn't good for the tires.

Bikes with gears(?!?) and handbrakes(?!?!) were just overly complicated, alien, superfluous things that easily broke and were impossible for us to fix and needed adjustments. Impossible for us to fix as we might have had a pair of pliers and a flathead screwdriver and maybe a hammer.

Hard to believe we would do 30 miles rides with no support, gears or money.
mirfi is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-18, 02:08 PM
  #25  
Bonzo Banana
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Merry Old England
Posts: 586

Bikes: Muddyfox Evolve 200, Bicycles4u Paris Explorer, Raleigh Twenty Stowaway, Bickerton California, Saracen Xile, Kona Hoss Deluxe, Vertigo Carnaby, Exodus Havoc, Kona Lanai, Revolution Cuillin Sport, Dawes Kingpin, Bickerton, NSU & Elswick Cosmopolitan

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 215 Post(s)
Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
@Bonzo Banana The parts of coaster hub brake is so robust. I don't see any way it can fail under normal use.

Fixie hubs on the other hand...looks like the cog could loosen and backout danger if not install carefully.
I'd agree about coaster brakes in general being robust but this particular bike seems to have a fairly high failure rate for its coaster brake.
Bonzo Banana is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service