Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Folding Bikes
Reload this Page >

My new Brompton impressions

Folding Bikes Discuss the unique features and issues of folding bikes. Also a great place to learn what folding bike will work best for your needs.

My new Brompton impressions

Reply

Old 06-02-18, 06:49 AM
  #26  
rishardh
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
rishardh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: North Texas
Posts: 429

Bikes: Kestrel Talon; Giant NRS Air; Litespeed Tuscany; Burley Rivazza; Cerverlo RS; BMC SLX01; Litespeed C1r, Merckx Corsa 01, Schwinn Traveller, Brompton M6L

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Originally Posted by FolderBeholder View Post
Nice selection there....
why LM couldnt do the sprung pliers (Wingman style) on more of them than they do mystifies me. For that reason my Wingman is my go-to set. And I added a thumbstud to it what a difference.
Those are their retired tools I've got. Yes, the wingman is also one my favorites due to the big scissors.Your thumbstud sounds like a neat idea.My EDC is a Juice S2 also due to scissors. Having a kid I use the scissors a lot.
rishardh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-18, 06:52 AM
  #27  
rishardh
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
rishardh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: North Texas
Posts: 429

Bikes: Kestrel Talon; Giant NRS Air; Litespeed Tuscany; Burley Rivazza; Cerverlo RS; BMC SLX01; Litespeed C1r, Merckx Corsa 01, Schwinn Traveller, Brompton M6L

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Close ups of the black lacquer finish.


rishardh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-18, 06:52 AM
  #28  
berlinonaut
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 483
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 224 Post(s)
Originally Posted by reppans View Post


Ahhh bummer - does the new plastic version still serve as an anti-roll device? Anyways, there's always the parts market:

clicky
Yes it does - that's it's purpose. It got AFAIK originally invented with the Easy Wheels in the early 2000s as with those mounted the short seat post did not reach the floor anymore. Thus the bung was sold bundeled with them or as a seperate spare-part - it was never a standard part. With the new standard roller wheels size increased, so there was the need for a bung as standard (and possibly it had to be cheap and light but did not need to be as high as the former version for the easy wheels. Here you go: https://brilliantbikes.co.uk/brompto...post-bung.html



Source: Brillianbikes.co.uk
berlinonaut is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-18, 07:33 AM
  #29  
FolderBeholder
Senior Member
 
FolderBeholder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Inland Southern California
Posts: 178

Bikes: 1963 Schwinn, EuroMini Urbano, Magnum Premium 48

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 69 Post(s)
Originally Posted by rishardh View Post
Having a kid I use the scissors a lot.
small world....as a kid I RAN with scissors a lot😜

back to your beautiful Brompton....did you test ride the different gearing and bar choices prior to ordering?
I did, and the test ride changed my precinceived preferences, I ended up ordering an S6L standard gearing....of course the more I read, the more I hope I chose well....second guessing my in-progress build even AFTER testing 3 different configs.
Will find out sometime in late July regardless.
(The power of too much available info.)
FolderBeholder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-18, 07:40 AM
  #30  
ttakata73
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Bangkok: hottest average temperature :(
Posts: 578

Bikes: BirdyGT, Cannondale Hooligan1, Totem KDS-D fatbike, 1998 GT Forte Ti 700c, Brompton M2LX 16", Dahon Dove 14" (6kg)

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 73 Post(s)
I'm not sure if innertubes degrade over time from oxygen exposure like car tires, but I bought a cheap $20 vacuum sealer off aliexpress so all my tubes should be fresh when I need them. I think you could fit a very long vacuum sealed innertube in the frame of a B.
ttakata73 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-18, 09:07 AM
  #31  
reppans
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 749

Bikes: Brompton M6R, Specialized Tricross Comp, Ellsworth Isis, Dahon Speed P8

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 301 Post(s)
Originally Posted by rishardh View Post
Dislikes...
Feels heavier than you think it should. This is trying to carry it folded.
Bromptons are no lightweights (mine is up 34lbs with lock/water/tools/etc permanently attached to it), but FWIW, I still find the compact and locking fold make it my easiest folder (by far) to carry for distance, up staircases, and through tight hallways/doors. For example, how would you carry THIS for 100 yards, or up to a 3rd story attic bedroom?
reppans is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-18, 10:06 AM
  #32  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 36,150

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 132 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5224 Post(s)
Plastic jug lacks the folding pedal, and is wider..

but if there is toxic algae in your city water supply,
you might need a jug of safer water , as well .

Blue-green algae behind low levels of cyanotoxins in Salem area water supply KATU
fietsbob is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-18, 10:44 AM
  #33  
reppans
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 749

Bikes: Brompton M6R, Specialized Tricross Comp, Ellsworth Isis, Dahon Speed P8

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 301 Post(s)
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Plastic jug lacks the folding pedal, and is wider..
Its also heavier, clear, and round - yeah, so what?

but if there is toxic algae in your city water supply,
you might need a jug of safer water , as well .

Blue-green algae behind low levels of cyanotoxins in Salem area water supply KATU
LOL - now there's a tangent!

Last edited by reppans; 06-02-18 at 11:44 AM.
reppans is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-18, 12:37 AM
  #34  
rishardh
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
rishardh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: North Texas
Posts: 429

Bikes: Kestrel Talon; Giant NRS Air; Litespeed Tuscany; Burley Rivazza; Cerverlo RS; BMC SLX01; Litespeed C1r, Merckx Corsa 01, Schwinn Traveller, Brompton M6L

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Originally Posted by FolderBeholder View Post

small world....as a kid I RAN with scissors a lot😜

back to your beautiful Brompton....did you test ride the different gearing and bar choices prior to ordering?
I did, and the test ride changed my precinceived preferences, I ended up ordering an S6L standard gearing....of course the more I read, the more I hope I chose well....second guessing my in-progress build even AFTER testing 3 different configs.
Will find out sometime in late July regardless.
(The power of too much available info.)
I wish I could have test ridden like you did. That would have been ideal. The closest dealer is about 3 hours away. I had to go with measurements given, reviews and pics and was still nervous until I got it and saw it in person because only then I could see what adjustments are needed to set it up as close to my other bikes. As you said you can get a lot of information on the internet but with the handlebar changes, stem changes, frame changes, etc it can be confusing.

I think for anyone uncertain the M bars is a safe choice because you can easily go lower up to a S bar height without any cable changes. As per my research the S stem is about 0.5 inches forward but I was ok with the M stem being a tad closer.

As for gearing I looked at what I use for my commute using Sheldon Brown's gear inch calculator and tried to match it to what was offered and the standard 6 speed was a match with one low and one high gear to spare. Later decided to do the -12% gearing option because I plan to take this bike when I visit Toronto which has some rollers north of the city.

That's how I ended up with a M6L which I converted to a S6L tonight The plan is to ride it as S when commuting and switch it to a M when touring.

Let us know when you get your bike.
rishardh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-18, 12:49 AM
  #35  
rishardh
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
rishardh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: North Texas
Posts: 429

Bikes: Kestrel Talon; Giant NRS Air; Litespeed Tuscany; Burley Rivazza; Cerverlo RS; BMC SLX01; Litespeed C1r, Merckx Corsa 01, Schwinn Traveller, Brompton M6L

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Originally Posted by reppans View Post


Bromptons are no lightweights (mine is up 34lbs with lock/water/tools/etc permanently attached to it), but FWIW, I still find the compact and locking fold make it my easiest folder (by far) to carry for distance, up staircases, and through tight hallways/doors. For example, how would you carry THIS for 100 yards, or up to a 3rd story attic bedroom?

When I started looking for a folding bike speed and being lightweight were top criterias. Almost bought a Dahon Mu 10SL from Thor (sorry Thor). Gave it more thought and realized I got other bikes that are fast and light. Fold size, comfort became the new top criteria and the Brompton came on top. I think mine will be north of 30lbs too once I add the bag and water bottle.
rishardh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-18, 12:58 AM
  #36  
rishardh
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
rishardh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: North Texas
Posts: 429

Bikes: Kestrel Talon; Giant NRS Air; Litespeed Tuscany; Burley Rivazza; Cerverlo RS; BMC SLX01; Litespeed C1r, Merckx Corsa 01, Schwinn Traveller, Brompton M6L

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Converted the M to S type flat bars tonight. Once I cut the new bars to 52cm it took less than 15 mins to do the swap.
rishardh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-18, 02:26 AM
  #37  
berlinonaut
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 483
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 224 Post(s)
Originally Posted by rishardh View Post
Feels heavier than you think it should.
There are some options to make this bike considerably lighter w/o much investment (depending on your needs):

- you have the telescopic seat post on the bike, but (at least on the photos) you seem not to use the telescopic part. Swap it for the non telescopic version would save you several 100g, swapping for a 3rd party titanium or carbon one from ebay even more.
- Not sure about the weight of the Selle SMP saddle. The stock Brompton Saddle is in the ~340g range. There are lighter saddles out there that may fit your bum. If interested I'd recommend looking at the Terry arteria or SQ-Lab (buth there are many).
- you have Schwalbe Marathons on the bike. Failsafe but heavy. Swap them for Schwalbe Kojaks, Marathon Racers or the discontinued Brompton Kevelars and you save again several 100g, with the exact amount depending from the tire choice. Plus those all roll better, again with the amount depending from the tire choice. (Btw.: Keep your tire pressure at 100 PSI - again a world of a difference).
- The original Brompton S-handlebar is about ~110g - surprisingly light. Swap your 3rd party MTB-bar for it and you will almost certainly save on weight.
- Leave pump (~90g) and toolkit (~200g) at home. Obviously a disadvantage when the **** hits the fan but again saving several 100g.
- Get a 2-speed rear wheel and use this instead of your 6-speed as long as you are not going into the hills. The 2-speed is a bit counterintuitive and widely underestimated as it seems pretty limited but it saves ~750g and is a (surprisingly) smooth ride for most people in a much wider area than expected. It is an easy swap back and forth - shifters can be left in place, just the wheel and (depending from your needs) the chainwheel and the chain. A 10 minute job. Most people that I know never swap back to the six speed or only very very occasionally.

Those tiny bits sum up - all in should easily be more than 1,5 kgs of weight saving possible (which is a whole world) just with the things mentioned above. Obviously your mileage may vary, just wanted to open you some possibilities.

BTW: I am wondering why you have the easy wheels mounted to your bike - the new standard wheels roll better in my opinion and come for free with the bike.
berlinonaut is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-18, 06:22 AM
  #38  
reppans
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 749

Bikes: Brompton M6R, Specialized Tricross Comp, Ellsworth Isis, Dahon Speed P8

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 301 Post(s)
Perhaps my point on weight was not clear - if you change the way you carry the bike (i.e., shoulder carry), it will feel MUCH lighter, and you'll be able to carry it much further, and much more easily though tight spots, over stairs, etc. No need to spends hundreds of $$ to save a couple lbs.

A five gallon water jug weighs 40lbs and the pros (household delivery guys) will almost always carry on their shoulder. Try a small stick-on pad on the main frame tube, and resting the folded bike upside down on your shoulder while holding the seat tube to balance it, leaning the left crank arm against your head. For even further carry distances, you can also rest the frame tube across both shoulders (folded or unfolded) which is like carrying 2 water buckets with a pole, again bike upside down.

I personally can not stand carrying the bike suitcase-style more than 10 yrds, or though doorways. When I'm touring, I probably carry the bike over a half mile a day (primarily to stealth camping spots deep in the woods/down a beach, and have once hiked it up a 30 story staircase).

Originally Posted by berlinonaut View Post
...BTW: I am wondering why you have the easy wheels mounted to your bike - the new standard wheels roll better in my opinion and come for free with the bike.
I have the new wheels (2016.... unless they've up graded it again), and recently swapped it the EZwheels. The EZs are slight larger diameter and have better shock absorption (due to the little 'tire') - together that helps it roll significantly smoother over sidewalk irregularities. I also have the rack and X-roller mod, and have rolled my bike and touring pannier many hours/miles baby-stroller style through museums and pedestrian parks while touring.
reppans is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-18, 02:52 PM
  #39  
rishardh
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
rishardh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: North Texas
Posts: 429

Bikes: Kestrel Talon; Giant NRS Air; Litespeed Tuscany; Burley Rivazza; Cerverlo RS; BMC SLX01; Litespeed C1r, Merckx Corsa 01, Schwinn Traveller, Brompton M6L

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Originally Posted by berlinonaut View Post
There are some options to make this bike considerably lighter w/o much investment (depending on your needs):

- you have the telescopic seat post on the bike, but (at least on the photos) you seem not to use the telescopic part. Swap it for the non telescopic version would save you several 100g, swapping for a 3rd party titanium or carbon one from ebay even more.
- Not sure about the weight of the Selle SMP saddle. The stock Brompton Saddle is in the ~340g range. There are lighter saddles out there that may fit your bum. If interested I'd recommend looking at the Terry arteria or SQ-Lab (buth there are many).
- you have Schwalbe Marathons on the bike. Failsafe but heavy. Swap them for Schwalbe Kojaks, Marathon Racers or the discontinued Brompton Kevelars and you save again several 100g, with the exact amount depending from the tire choice. Plus those all roll better, again with the amount depending from the tire choice. (Btw.: Keep your tire pressure at 100 PSI - again a world of a difference).
- The original Brompton S-handlebar is about ~110g - surprisingly light. Swap your 3rd party MTB-bar for it and you will almost certainly save on weight.
- Leave pump (~90g) and toolkit (~200g) at home. Obviously a disadvantage when the **** hits the fan but again saving several 100g.
- Get a 2-speed rear wheel and use this instead of your 6-speed as long as you are not going into the hills. The 2-speed is a bit counterintuitive and widely underestimated as it seems pretty limited but it saves ~750g and is a (surprisingly) smooth ride for most people in a much wider area than expected. It is an easy swap back and forth - shifters can be left in place, just the wheel and (depending from your needs) the chainwheel and the chain. A 10 minute job. Most people that I know never swap back to the six speed or only very very occasionally.

Those tiny bits sum up - all in should easily be more than 1,5 kgs of weight saving possible (which is a whole world) just with the things mentioned above. Obviously your mileage may vary, just wanted to open you some possibilities.

BTW: I am wondering why you have the easy wheels mounted to your bike - the new standard wheels roll better in my opinion and come for free with the bike.

Some very good ideas. Thanks! I am building this bike with weight not being a factor but still want to keep it around or under 30lbs. I am already thinking of a Brompton for my wife and will probably do light weight brompton for her with Ti parts and some of your suggestions. I agree, everything adds up in the end. I once had an obsession to build a road bike under 15lbs (10 years ago).
rishardh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-18, 03:12 PM
  #40  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 36,150

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 132 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5224 Post(s)
and a double crank , from other sources can weigh less than the stock,
and with 'greasy finger shifting' * you add no extra weight for a FD etc.
your 2 speed can be a 4 for those hills ..

* heel can detail to the small one, but .. with a rag or your fingers you pull the chain from the small to the large .
...with a brief stop..

[54-34 replicates what the 'speed drive' geared crank offers]





.....
fietsbob is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-18, 03:30 PM
  #41  
berlinonaut
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 483
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 224 Post(s)
Originally Posted by rishardh View Post
I am already thinking of a Brompton for my wife and will probably do light weight brompton for her with Ti parts and some of your suggestions. I agree, everything adds up in the end.
The ti-version is expensive but in my eyes worth it if you can afford it. I own serveral Bromptons and my favorite clear favorite by far is the 2lx (which is my everyday bike). Light, fast and handy. I am running it with a 60t chainwheel in the meantime (stock is 54-12/16) which makes it very fast in the flat but is obviously not made for hills. The stock 54 is in my opinion a very good choice for most riders.
berlinonaut is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-18, 05:22 PM
  #42  
rishardh
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
rishardh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: North Texas
Posts: 429

Bikes: Kestrel Talon; Giant NRS Air; Litespeed Tuscany; Burley Rivazza; Cerverlo RS; BMC SLX01; Litespeed C1r, Merckx Corsa 01, Schwinn Traveller, Brompton M6L

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
and a double crank , from other sources can weigh less than the stock,
and with 'greasy finger shifting' * you add no extra weight for a FD etc.
your 2 speed can be a 4 for those hills ..

* heel can detail to the small one, but .. with a rag or your fingers you pull the chain from the small to the large .
...with a brief stop..

[54-34 replicates what the 'speed drive' geared crank offers]



.....
'Greasy finger shifting'... lol. Brilliant! Good option for 2 speeders. Don't like the idea you have to stop to shift though but it's a good bail out option. A 'Brompton Granny' haha.
rishardh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-18, 05:53 PM
  #43  
rishardh
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
rishardh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: North Texas
Posts: 429

Bikes: Kestrel Talon; Giant NRS Air; Litespeed Tuscany; Burley Rivazza; Cerverlo RS; BMC SLX01; Litespeed C1r, Merckx Corsa 01, Schwinn Traveller, Brompton M6L

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Originally Posted by berlinonaut View Post
The ti-version is expensive but in my eyes worth it if you can afford it. I own serveral Bromptons and my favorite clear favorite by far is the 2lx (which is my everyday bike). Light, fast and handy. I am running it with a 60t chainwheel in the meantime (stock is 54-12/16) which makes it very fast in the flat but is obviously not made for hills. The stock 54 is in my opinion a very good choice for most riders.

From what I have been told a light weight Brompton will be felt only when carrying the bike. Due to the small wheel size and how fast they spin bike weight is not a factor when riding.Good to note that there is a difference, coming from a person who owns several Bromptons.


I need 40 gear inches for two climbs in my commute and then 75 gear inches on the downhills. I could have gone with the -12% 3 speed (42, 56, 72 gear inches) but it was a no brainer to go with 6 speeds for $80 more without any significant weight increase. If I could setup a 2 speed with 40 and 75 gear inches I would like to know about it but that's a big jump.
rishardh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-18, 12:27 AM
  #44  
berlinonaut
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 483
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 224 Post(s)
Originally Posted by rishardh View Post
From what I have been told a light weight Brompton will be felt only when carrying the bike. Due to the small wheel size and how fast they spin bike weight is not a factor when riding.Good to note that there is a difference, coming from a person who owns several Bromptons.
The difference while riding is very small, though some people say the ti-version would be more comfortable. I am not sensitive enough to recognize a relevant difference. When carrying it makes a whole of a difference (and I have to carry my bikes a lot). The other thing is: Many Brompton riders try to bring down bike weight after some time which can be to a degree done with aftermarket parts but takes research, time and effort. Saving ~750g from the start is a good idea, the more, as you can switch to the ti fork and rear frame later only for even more money. Plus ti is corrosion resistant and will not wear relevantly regarding the looks. The steel will, especially on the chainstay where the frontwheel is hooked in. So in the end ti has some advantages but costs a lot extra. It has however no disadvantages apart from the price. Thus: If you can afford it a good choice.

Originally Posted by rishardh View Post
If I could setup a 2 speed with 40 and 75 gear inches I would like to know about it but that's a big jump.
You could get there by just adding a 39t chainwheel to the stock 54t on the front - exactly 40 to 75 GI. You do not have to stop to downshift (can be done with a heelstrike), but greasy fingers apply for shifting to the big chainwheel. A classical "granny gear" setup.
Bicycle Gear Calculator
berlinonaut is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-18, 07:02 AM
  #45  
12boy
Senior Member
 
12boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: casper wy usa
Posts: 327

Bikes: brompton sl, surly steamroller, fuji track, gary fisher bmx minivelo etc

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
I have 2 rear wheels... a single speed with 12 tooth sprocket and a close ratio (177 %) SA hub for the second. I also have a 53/38 110 BCD chainring set up in front. I use the single wheel in winter with studded tires since I don`t need much top end but the studded tires add a lot of drag so I like the low with the 38 for hills. In the summer the 3 speed set up is great for commuting up hills and in the heat. When the 53 wears out i will replace it with a 54 or 56, but the 53 gives me 84 GI which is prety nice.
12boy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-18, 09:30 AM
  #46  
rishardh
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
rishardh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: North Texas
Posts: 429

Bikes: Kestrel Talon; Giant NRS Air; Litespeed Tuscany; Burley Rivazza; Cerverlo RS; BMC SLX01; Litespeed C1r, Merckx Corsa 01, Schwinn Traveller, Brompton M6L

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Originally Posted by berlinonaut View Post
The difference while riding is very small, though some people say the ti-version would be more comfortable. I am not sensitive enough to recognize a relevant difference. When carrying it makes a whole of a difference (and I have to carry my bikes a lot). The other thing is: Many Brompton riders try to bring down bike weight after some time which can be to a degree done with aftermarket parts but takes research, time and effort. Saving ~750g from the start is a good idea, the more, as you can switch to the ti fork and rear frame later only for even more money. Plus ti is corrosion resistant and will not wear relevantly regarding the looks. The steel will, especially on the chainstay where the frontwheel is hooked in. So in the end ti has some advantages but costs a lot extra. It has however no disadvantages apart from the price. Thus: If you can afford it a good choice.



You could get there by just adding a 39t chainwheel to the stock 54t on the front - exactly 40 to 75 GI. You do not have to stop to downshift (can be done with a heelstrike), but greasy fingers apply for shifting to the big chainwheel. A classical "granny gear" setup.
Bicycle Gear Calculator

Thanks berlinonaut. That's an option I never thought of but dislike dismounting to shift. If I get stronger I might go with the 2 speed and and do a double chain ring setup for lazy days / feel good days.
rishardh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-18, 09:32 AM
  #47  
rishardh
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
rishardh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: North Texas
Posts: 429

Bikes: Kestrel Talon; Giant NRS Air; Litespeed Tuscany; Burley Rivazza; Cerverlo RS; BMC SLX01; Litespeed C1r, Merckx Corsa 01, Schwinn Traveller, Brompton M6L

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Originally Posted by 12boy View Post
I have 2 rear wheels... a single speed with 12 tooth sprocket and a close ratio (177 %) SA hub for the second. I also have a 53/38 110 BCD chainring set up in front. I use the single wheel in winter with studded tires since I don`t need much top end but the studded tires add a lot of drag so I like the low with the 38 for hills. In the summer the 3 speed set up is great for commuting up hills and in the heat. When the 53 wears out i will replace it with a 54 or 56, but the 53 gives me 84 GI which is prety nice.

Neat setup. I might do something like this once I have ridden and have a feel for what I need. Mine will be for touring and commuting.
rishardh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-18, 04:01 PM
  #48  
Caliwild
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 596
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 150 Post(s)
Belated congratulations on your bike! Best "color" in my humble opinion, but I'm biased...

Caliwild is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-18, 07:17 PM
  #49  
rishardh
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
rishardh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: North Texas
Posts: 429

Bikes: Kestrel Talon; Giant NRS Air; Litespeed Tuscany; Burley Rivazza; Cerverlo RS; BMC SLX01; Litespeed C1r, Merckx Corsa 01, Schwinn Traveller, Brompton M6L

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Caliwild View Post
Belated congratulations on your bike! Best "color" in my humble opinion, but I'm biased...


Thanks and that's a beautiful pic that captures how it looks. I tried but could not get a pic to do it justice. Congrats to you too
rishardh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-18, 06:34 AM
  #50  
12boy
Senior Member
 
12boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: casper wy usa
Posts: 327

Bikes: brompton sl, surly steamroller, fuji track, gary fisher bmx minivelo etc

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
When I use the Sheldon Brown gear inch calculator with 16 inch wheels and 1 3/8 tires, 54 tooth chainring and 12 tooth sprocket, I get 72.3 gear inches not 74. Can anyone explain this?
12boy is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service