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Change fork on Tern

Old 07-06-18, 01:00 PM
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post78
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Change fork on Tern

I have a new Link D7i and I'm experiencing a bit of discomfort on my wrists.
The seat is adjusted to an appropriate height for pedal reach and then lowered slightly to find a middle ground for wrist comfort. The seat is currently as low as I'm comfortable with to avoid hip movement but I still feel that I'm putting too much pressure on my hands. Additionally, the front is a little rough for my liking, which is probably due to the aluminum forks. My saddle is quite comfortable so it's primarily the front that needs either some softening or height adjustment so that I'm not supporting as much weight on my wrists.
I'm 6'1 and this was one of the more comfortable bikes I tested which included Brompton and Dahon (wanted to test a Downtube but couldn't), however it can still use some improvement.

Can I exchange the front fork (aluminum, I believe) with steel? Also, can I use a fork that's maybe an inch longer or would that mess with the rest of the ride too much? The Andros stem seems to limit certain modifications.
I'm open to other suggestions as well.

Thank you.
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Old 07-06-18, 01:21 PM
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Originally Posted by post78 View Post
I have a new Link D7i and I'm experiencing a bit of discomfort on my wrists.
The seat is adjusted to an appropriate height for pedal reach and then lowered slightly to find a middle ground for wrist comfort. The seat is currently as low as I'm comfortable with to avoid hip movement but I still feel that I'm putting too much pressure on my hands. Additionally, the front is a little rough for my liking, which is probably due to the aluminum forks. My saddle is quite comfortable so it's primarily the front that needs either some softening or height adjustment so that I'm not supporting as much weight on my wrists.
I'm 6'1 and this was one of the more comfortable bikes I tested which included Brompton and Dahon (wanted to test a Downtube but couldn't), however it can still use some improvement.

Can I exchange the front fork (aluminum, I believe) with steel? Also, can I use a fork that's maybe an inch longer or would that mess with the rest of the ride too much? The Andros stem seems to limit certain modifications.
I'm open to other suggestions as well.

Thank you.
...if you change the height of the fork, the bike might lose it's ability to have a firm triangle stand on both wheels and the seat post when folded. I experienced that with one of my bikes. The impact on the riding geometry is moderate, the biggest change might be the ground clearance of the Pedals.
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Old 07-06-18, 01:31 PM
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Too much pressure on hands/wrists is caused by a bar that's too high or too close. Change your stem to a longer reach & or lower or both.

I'm unfamiliar with what kind of bike you have, but if it's a standard threadless stem, flip it over 180 degrees, or swap some spacers that are under it to now be on top of it. Either or both would get some weight off your hands and cost exactly 0$

Failing that, a co-op probably has boxes of stems for cheap. Or the shop you bought the bike from has a box of take-offs available for a discount rate. Any good shop would swap out/work with you to make sure the bike they sold you fit right.
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Old 07-06-18, 01:33 PM
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Originally Posted by splithub View Post
...if you change the height of the fork, the bike might lose it's ability to have a firm triangle stand on both wheels and the seat post when folded. I experienced that with one of my bikes. The impact on the riding geometry is moderate, the biggest change might be the ground clearance of the Pedals.
Okay understood. Thanks for the response!

Upon further inspection it looks like Tern offers different lengths and angles of handleposts, which might take care of the height issue. Seems like finding a steel or possibly a suspension front fork is all of have left to do. I think with a slightly higher hand grip I'd feel less of the road and might just need steel.
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Old 07-06-18, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by base2 View Post
Too much pressure on hands/wrists is caused by a bar that's too high or too close. Change your stem to a longer reach & or lower or both.

I'm unfamiliar with what kind of bike you have, but if it's a standard threadless stem, flip it over 180 degrees, or swap some spacers that are under it to now be on top of it. Either or both would get some weight off your hands and cost exactly 0$

Failing that, a co-op probably has boxes of stems for cheap. Or the shop you bought the bike from has a box of take-offs available for a discount rate. Any good shop would swap out/work with you to make sure the bike they sold you fit right.
Thanks for responding! The problem is actually that the handlebars are too low, not too high. I wish to sit a little more upright but I'm having to lean forward too much. With the current handlebar stem I'm able to move the bars farther (or closer), which in turn lowers the bars and is then less comfortable. I currently have them as upright as I can get them but still need another inch or so.

The spacer idea is a good one if the handlepost option doesn't work.

Thanks!
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Old 07-06-18, 02:26 PM
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Update:

Well, according to the website the forks are actually "high tensile steel". They sound like aluminum and ride similarly to other aluminum forks I've been on. This is my first foldng bike so perhaps I'm just not used to the feeling. Maybe it really is just the height that's bugging me...
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Old 07-06-18, 03:24 PM
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Aber Hallo Handlebars, Extenders and Bar Ends
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Old 07-08-18, 06:49 AM
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I have the Ergon GP5s on my Tern. In conjunction with the adjustability of the Andros stem, it can change reach and/or height quite a bit, and doesn’t really have a huge effect on folded size.
Also the extra hand positions are always a good way to avoid numbness.



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Old 07-09-18, 11:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Mtroup View Post
I have the Ergon GP5s on my Tern. In conjunction with the adjustability of the Andros stem, it can change reach and/or height quite a bit, and doesn’t really have a huge effect on folded size.
Also the extra hand positions are always a good way to avoid numbness.


Thanks I'll check these out! I'm also looking at riser bars, but they seem to be hard to find for Andros.
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Old 07-10-18, 01:01 AM
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Originally Posted by base2 View Post
Too much pressure on hands/wrists is caused by a bar that's too high or too close.
You have this completely backwards. A lower handlebar causes more weight to be placed on your hands, the same with reach, the longer the reach the more you lean and the more weight moves forward.

To prove this just stand up and lean over, you will fall forwards not backwards.
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Old 07-10-18, 07:10 AM
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Well, if you know so much about bike fit, that goes so contrary to conventional wisdom, who am I to correct you?

Carry on.

In fact go ride a childs bike and let me know just how comfortable the weight distribution is on the 5 contact points.

Then go ride a bike thats 2 or 3 sizes too big and tell me about your lower back pain and theres no weight on your hands because they can hardly reach the bars.

Bike fit is about weight distribution as much as it anything else. Too much hand pressure, numbness, sore shoulders/neck means those parts are unfairly assuming load that should be elsewhere. The pressure comes from fighting the natural muscle supported posture for your skeletal structure dimensions. Adding more load by moving the bars closer is only going to make it worse. Increasing the distance between the flat level seat and the bars reduces the fight between the size of you, and the space you have. Tilting the seat up a few degrees can help in this regard as well.

But go ahead peddle wrong information. I'm not going to do an online fit clinic. The 10 bikes I own of various different types and the countless bikes I have set up &/or adjusted for others along with the 10's of thousands of happy miles thos bikes have done pale in comparison to your sage internet wisdom.

OP: Are your wrists straight?

Last edited by base2; 07-10-18 at 11:12 AM.
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Old 07-13-18, 04:14 AM
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Originally Posted by base2 View Post
Well, if you know so much about bike fit, that goes so contrary to conventional wisdom, who am I to correct you?

Carry on.

In fact go ride a childs bike and let me know just how comfortable the weight distribution is on the 5 contact points.

Then go ride a bike thats 2 or 3 sizes too big and tell me about your lower back pain and theres no weight on your hands because they can hardly reach the bars.

Bike fit is about weight distribution as much as it anything else. Too much hand pressure, numbness, sore shoulders/neck means those parts are unfairly assuming load that should be elsewhere. The pressure comes from fighting the natural muscle supported posture for your skeletal structure dimensions. Adding more load by moving the bars closer is only going to make it worse. Increasing the distance between the flat level seat and the bars reduces the fight between the size of you, and the space you have. Tilting the seat up a few degrees can help in this regard as well.

But go ahead peddle wrong information. I'm not going to do an online fit clinic. The 10 bikes I own of various different types and the countless bikes I have set up &/or adjusted for others along with the 10's of thousands of happy miles thos bikes have done pale in comparison to your sage internet wisdom.

OP: Are your wrists straight?

Really not sure what planet you are on. Its basic physics that everyone should simply understand from experience living. Lean forward and your center of gravity moves forward, thus more weight is being placed on the bars when lengthening the reach. Changing the stem height has the same effect, lowering it puts your center of gravity more forward, raising it more backward. If a low stem and long reach were most comfortable/less pressure then cruiser bikes would be identical to pro TT bikes, but they arent.

Please just follow the logic: Learn over and keep leaning over. Eventually you will fall over forward right? Why do you think this is? Its because your weight is going forward, and thus when you are on a bike that forward weight is going though your arms. Being on a bike doesn't except you from physics. I am not sure how you can claim so much experience yet not know the first thing about riding a bike.

Is there anyone else out there who thinks a slammed long stem = least pressure on the bars?
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Old 07-13-18, 06:00 AM
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Originally Posted by kidshibuya View Post
Really not sure what planet you are on. Its basic physics that everyone should simply understand from experience living. Lean forward and your center of gravity moves forward, thus more weight is being placed on the bars when lengthening the reach. Changing the stem height has the same effect, lowering it puts your center of gravity more forward, raising it more backward. If a low stem and long reach were most comfortable/less pressure then cruiser bikes would be identical to pro TT bikes, but they arent.

Please just follow the logic: Learn over and keep leaning over. Eventually you will fall over forward right? Why do you think this is? Its because your weight is going forward, and thus when you are on a bike that forward weight is going though your arms. Being on a bike doesn't except you from physics. I am not sure how you can claim so much experience yet not know the first thing about riding a bike.

Is there anyone else out there who thinks a slammed long stem = least pressure on the bars?
i think you are partialy right.
lower/farther steam leads to agressive style os riding, witch is more aero, but put pressure on all upper torso...back, neck, arms, shoulders, wrists and hands. All will suffer.
to a ridding like thath become confortable all muscles must be build, witch is not a overnight task. This is only for fit riders.
Non fit riders can have a mutch more pleasing using bike riding going for confortable/ moderated upper/closer steam, witch still uses 5 points contact but focus more on lower muscles.
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Old 07-13-18, 09:17 AM
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I realize it's counterintuitive, but Base2 may be right. The correct way to dial your position is to get the saddle-to-pedal dimensions right, then put the bars at a comfortable reach and height. If they're too close/high, your body will have the sensation of trying to "push through" the grips to get to the correct location, causing hand pressure. Which is certainly a common issue with taller folks on 'one size fits all' folders.
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