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Wheel axle skewer locks

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Wheel axle skewer locks

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Old 11-27-18, 08:47 AM
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tomtomtom123
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Wheel axle skewer locks

Has anyone used axle skewer locks, like the Abus NutFix, IXOW, or Zefal gravity locks? How do you rate them? And did you find the correct length for the 74mm front hub?

What about a lock for the 34mm seatpost?
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Old 11-27-18, 01:35 PM
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Hexlox

Hexlox makes skewers that you have to cut to size for the wheels, and they also make a quick release binder bolt set for the seatpost. Both work very well on my dahon mu sl
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Old 11-27-18, 03:52 PM
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Hm... looks very interesting. Although locking the seatpost makes it inconvenient when needing to fold and unfold quickly. Currently I have my saddle cable locked to the rear rack, and will lock that cable to an immovable object when parking (in addition to a U-lock to the bike frame). So stealing the saddle would require cutting the cable, or unscrewing 4x screws on the rack if I forget to attach the cable lock to something. The thud-buster seat post though isn't locked to anything, so one Hexlox would be effective at keeping the saddle and seatpost together (but I think the bolt uses a 3.5mm hex, which might not work with Hexlox). So if I can lock the seatpost and saddle together and skip the hexlox on the seatpost clamp, at least both components are secured by a cable lock. But I guess if I'm in a situation where I'm not folding the bike frequently, I could switch the seatpost clamp to a Hexlox bolt.

If I'm leaving the bike for a long time, I usually fold the bike and pass the cable lock through both wheels and frame, then U-lock the frame to an immovable object. If I'm only going to the grocery store, I don't fold the bike and don't lock the wheels. The Hexlox skewers might be good in this situation. However, I'm not sure if thieves target 20" wheels because of low demand, but I guess they'll take anything they see that are easy to grab.

It's not easy to U-lock the rear wheel together with the frame to a vertical parking-post because of the angle and distance of the stays and tubes to the wheels.
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Old 11-28-18, 06:14 PM
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Location?

I'm using a bolt skewer, such as Schmidt supplies for their Brompton dyno hubs ,
I got an extra for my standard 24 spoke front wheel on my Bike Friday Tikit..
which had a lever QR..

hex 'allen' wrench secures it..

10cm, wide from most sources is easier to find than 74..

skewers probably .. threaded then heat treated,
so cutting and re threading is less than simple.
Especially if thread is rolled in ,
so rest of skewer, is thinner than the threaded part..




..

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Old 12-01-18, 07:12 AM
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I do not have a bike with a 74mm hub, can't comment on that.

But when I do bike touring I use the skewers that any 5mm allen wrench will work on. I do not want any complicated skewer designs and I certainly do not want one that needs a special tool that I might lose. I am assuming that a bike thief is an opportunist and will only steal what is easy to steal quickly. And I am assuming that the opportunist thief does not carry around a multi tool to remove the wheels.

And my errand bike, I use the bolt on skewers instead of quick release. But on that bike I have the quick release seatpost, so I (like you) have a thin cable holding the saddle to the bike frame.
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Old 12-01-18, 11:32 AM
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The narrower hubs, are a folding bike thing..
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Old 12-24-18, 01:08 PM
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I decided to try the Hexlox because it seems to be the most adaptable and simplest system to use. They said their short road skewer have threads starting at 84-85mm so it might be short enough to fit on the 74mm front hub. I'll use an angle grinder to cut off the end.

I will replace the quick release seat post lever with their bolt, and on days or on trips where I expect to do a lot of folding, I will switch it back to the quick release. If the bolt is on, and I need to fold the bike, I'll put the small hexlox key on my keychain, along with a 5mm allen wrench that comes with a keychain holder at the end. I guess undoing and redoing the bolt might add around 15 seconds to the folding.

I'll put it on my bar end grips and the T-handlebar extension to prevent the shifters or the whole handlebar from being stripped off, the handlepost clamping screw, the wheels, and the dropout hanger and rear derailleur, and the seatpost clamp and saddle screw. I added an additional key to leave at home in case I lose the original key. All together the cost was 160€ after a 10% coupon code was applied. I missed the 25% black friday coupon which would have been another 26€ off.

I don't plan yet to put them on the rear rack because they need 4 screws which would cost 48€ to fit with hexlox, or the front deraileur which looks beaten up. Although it would be very inconvenient to lose the rear rack during a tour, although I assume the rack and FD are the least tempting components to thieves. My Sugino 24mm spindle cranks can't be removed unless the thief has a left hand screw to insert into the compression bolt. the 5mm hex hole on the bolt got stripped so I drilled it out and threaded it left-handed in order to get it off. Although one component that is easy to steal is the MKS EZY Superior quick release pedals. The old EZY with safety clips would probably be better at confusing thieves if they don't know about MKS quick releases.

I will probably get it next week and I'll give a review.
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Old 12-24-18, 05:16 PM
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I was disappointed with Hexlox. I could not get rid of it fast enough. I got them from the Kickstarter. Very hard to use. The key in general did not work. Perhaps they got their act together but it strikes me know that it is difficult to make unique keys in such a small format.
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Old 12-24-18, 05:47 PM
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You have wheels stolen off a folding bike?

Pitlock is not a crowd funded start up they are well established in Germany, for many years..
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Old 02-01-19, 05:56 PM
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I've only used the Hexlox for a short time now. Here is my brief review.

The old videos that they published are a little bit confusing as to how to install and remove the magnets, so it took me a while to realize how to use them correctly. They show a twisting motion when installing and extracting. But there are no moving parts inside. It is relying on the friction between the cone on the magnet and the depression in the key, for the key to hold onto the magnet. So twisting is not always necessary when extracting, unless you have problems getting the key to grip onto the magnet. Twisting while pressing may help increase the friction. Otherwise you could simply press the key straight in, perpendicularly without twisting. Twisting is needed when removing the key after installing the magnet into the socket head of the screw, but it does not need to be a precise amount of turn. One of the videos says 1/4 turn, but it could be as small as 1/16. The twist simply releases the friction between the key and the magnet, and when you twist, you should not press in, otherwise you'll be increasing the friction which is the opposite of what you want.

The magnet themselves are not extremely strong. But probably strong enough to prevent extraction with simple tweezers. As long as the bottom of the socket head in the screw is flat. I have a few screws on my bike that have a cone pointed depression, or a small hole inside the bottom of the socket head, causing the magnetic bond to be very loose, so the magnet wiggles around inside. The standard hexlox magnet will not work with stainless steel, aluminum, or titanium screws. They have an alternate version for these other materials, that comes with a small adhesive magnetic sheet that you stick inside the socket head.

The socket head bolt skewer set is good. The anti-rotation tabs on the end caps prevents them from being extracted by pliers. There are enough threads on the bolt for the 100mm front hub to be used on 74mm hub for Dahon. You can cut the bolt down with a dremel/proxxon tool, angle grinder, or band saw. I could not cut the bolt with one of those cheap wire stripper/crimpers that have slots for trimming bolts. The steel was too hard. Before you start cutting the bolt, insert an M5 nut. After you cut the bolt, remove the M5 nut and run it back and forth over the cut, to repair the threads on the end. The end cap has a little plastic cover that goes over the socket head to help reduce road dust from getting inside the head.

Security wise, the hexlox magnet is probably an effective deterrent for thieves who don't know how it works. They'll move on to an easier target, as long as you park your bike near other bikes that have easier parts to strip off, and if your components are not expensive enough compared to the other bikes around yours, to justify the effort to steal them.

The hexlox could be defeated by drilling a hole through the magnet. It would probably take less than 10 seconds, if you choose the correct, matching diameter drill bit. I have not attempted to drill it, but probably after a few seconds of drilling, the jagged edges on the material might grip onto the drill bit, and then you could probably pull out the hexlox by the drill bit.

Another way of defeating the hexlox without having to drill a hole, is probably making your own compatible key. If you had some kind of straw shaped material with a rough and flexible surface, with a slightly undersized cone shaped depression on the end, you could press it into the hexlox magnet. If you could generate enough friction, you could extract the magnet.

The benefit of the hexlox is that it is compatible with any existing standard socket head screw that are 4, 5, 6, 8mm. You don't need to change your existing hardware (except for the skewers), and if you decide that you need faster access while on a trip, you could simply leave the hexlox off. The key is very small and can be carried on your normal house key chain. Although I haven't figured out where to put the 5mm allen wrench if I want to adjust my seat height (maybe in my wallet?). In terms of security, the gravity locks from Abus are probably more effective for wheels. But for other components that simply have a standard socket head screw, I don't think there are other options than the hexlox, except for screws with specially designed heads.
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Old 02-02-19, 11:52 AM
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I use the hex socket head bolt skewers that Schmidt supplies in 74 fork types for my Brompton ,
and Bike Friday Tikit I replaced the lever QR with another one.. even Shimano's folding bike dynohub wheels used schmidt's skewers [& 100 for my other 2 dynohub bikes.. ]

Brompton makes a tool kit that stows in the front portion of the frame , accessed when folded, and as a forum member showed, a spare tube can go in the back part of the frame tube...





.....
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Old 02-02-19, 05:35 PM
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The bolt from Schmidt is stainless steel, and the socket is 4mm, so it will not work with a hexlox magnet. Hexlox doesn't make a magnetic adapter for 4mm socket. The hexlox bolt has a 5mm socket and is made of steel, so it is compatible with the hexlox magnet.

The Schmidt set appears to have a knurled nut without anti turning tabs, so it can be easily removed with pliers.
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Old 02-04-19, 04:30 PM
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"you're boned" , says Bender..

Actually the ends are stainless, the ones for their regular hubs those parts are aluminum ../

no EZ shopping online solution..

Just fold & bring the bike Inside with you ..

Or Move to somewhere they don't steal bikes.. I don't have gangs of roving bike strippers here..
we have fish to catch can and freeze, so always work if they want to do any..

a few live on the streets
because they don't want to do much more than collect cans for the deposit. (10c a piece)







...

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Old 02-04-19, 04:43 PM
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ask Pitlock if they can make short ones yet? Germans all learn English , too, now .... particularly to sell to them ...
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Old 02-25-19, 02:17 PM
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I thought of another way to defeat the Hexlox. Apply some superglue (cyanoacrylate) to the end of a stick, hold it to the Hexlox for 10 seconds, and then pull it out.
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