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Downtube folding bike

Old 12-30-06, 09:40 AM
  #876  
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Tim:

Regarding the pedals, I have both the plastic and alloy one. I actually like the plastic better. The alloy one is really heavy. Neither one are designed for big loads anyway. If you're planning to stand on your pedals, you should plan to buy a sturdier one. But for casual pedalling, the plastic one works fine.

Curious: Was your pedal spinning problem solvable by loosening the pedal? Do you have a pedal wrench, if not a normal crescent wrench can solve it.

Re: metal filings - I wasn't sure from your post. Did YOU find metal filings in your tire, or did you just raise that hypothetically.

I have 4 Downtubes now. I, like many others here, have found them to be tremendous values. More so than any other bike manufacturer I can think of. Are they perfect? No. But, for the $200 you paid on eBay for your bike, you got one smokin' deal. Spend a couple of hours tweeking and upgrading, and you've got yourself a wonderful bike that will last a long long time.

If you can't wrench, or don't want to, but still expect perfection, you have the option to shell out $3000 for Bike Friday. Even then, you won't be guaranteed perfection.

We've also found Yan to be exceptional to deal with on problems. Again, more so than any other manufacturer on the market. What issues are you experiencing with him?
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Old 12-30-06, 10:47 AM
  #877  
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Yan:

I noticed you're starting to list 2007 models on your website. Are there any significant differences between that and 2006 1/2 that we should be aware of?
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Old 12-30-06, 03:33 PM
  #878  
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Originally Posted by SesameCrunch

Regarding the pedals, I have both the plastic and alloy one. I actually like the plastic better. The alloy one is really heavy. Neither one are designed for big loads anyway. [Thanks. My previous plastics flexed under load -- I had hoped the advertised alloys would be better.]

Curious: Was your pedal spinning problem solvable by loosening the pedal? Do you have a pedal wrench [yes], if not a normal crescent wrench can solve it. [The problem is in the bearings, not the attachment to the crank.]

Re: metal filings - I wasn't sure from your post. Did YOU find metal filings in your tire, or did you just raise that hypothetically. [Yes, I found filings, along with many other problems.]

I have 4 Downtubes now. I, like many others here, have found them to be tremendous values. [Agreed.]

We've also found Yan to be exceptional to deal with on problems. Again, more so than any other manufacturer on the market. [Yep -- the experience of most on this list.] What issues are you experiencing with him? [The big one is the pedals, but there are others. I suspect most on this list would also call the pedals defective and expect replacement, perhaps even with the advertised product.] [
[My replies above]

Air, thanks for jogging my memory. Readers who want to try the duct-tape flap can either form the curve directly on the fender or use a water bottle to pre-form before sticking to the fender. Both worked for me. Looking forward to seeing your flaps (which may last longer) and your magnet latch,

Tim
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Old 01-03-07, 01:25 AM
  #879  
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Flat Prevention?

First flat this past Sunday -- of course, miles from home. Silver lining -- noticed a groove in the left rear wheel rim braking surface > extracted a metal filing embedded in the brake shoe, another item for the trouble check lists when I have time to do them.

Question: In this 20" tire world what really works to prevent flats? On my touring bike I have tried Tuffy liners (cracked with aging and sawed into tube), Slime (clumped at bottom of stem and made inflation difficult), and Kevlar belts (some improvement but not bullet proof). My best solution has been cutting the sidewalls off old tires and putting the old treds inside the new tires. Obviously, weight and speed issues are secondary. I misread the IXNS description and expected the larger (tougher?) 1.75" tire on the rear, where I usually experience the most flats. People on this list have mentioned swapping for "Big Apples", but that seems mostly for speed. ????

Tim
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Old 01-03-07, 03:16 AM
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@Tim - get some Scwhalbe Marathon Plus tyres - they will withstand all but v large, sharp fragments: 20x1.75 (47-406) 70 Max PSI, Weight 710g.
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Old 01-03-07, 04:53 AM
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Well, I just fınshed a two week tour of Turkey on my modıfıed mını and ıt was a blast! The bıke handled great, and ıt was very easy to fold up and take on the dolmuş when I dıdn't want to rıde on the busıer roads. I wrıte more and post pıcs later ın a couple of days. I do have a lıttle problem wıth the SA hub. It has become very squeeky and a lıttle stıcky. When I lıft the wheel and spın the pedals, there seems to be some frıctıon ın the hub that slows down the spın of the wheel. If I remember correctly, I am not supposed to and any lube around the seal of the hub? Is thıs correct?
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Old 01-03-07, 06:29 AM
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Originally Posted by SesameCrunch
As an update, I bought a Tiagra front derailleur off eBay and installed it to protect against chain drop. I did not route/install cables for the FD, since I don't intend to shift with it. I bought a double derailleur, but I should have gotten a triple. It needed the wider cage. I ended up just manually widening the cage so it could accommodate the entire 9 gears. I'm hoping that will take care of the problem for good.

Now all my planned modifications are complete. I'm very happy with it. It's a gorgeous bike (see pictures posted earlier). Guess I'll have to go find another bike to tinker with, eh?



hi seseamecrunch,

have you any pictures of your front deraillier set up? my chain drop has come back with a vengence ripping off the plastic chain guard. i think its time for me to solve the problem. a photo would be great to give me some guidance.

nice bike by the way.

barney
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Old 01-03-07, 07:29 AM
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I'd get the schwalbe marathons as suggested (they just came out with an ultra). The big apple's also have great puncture protection.
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Old 01-03-07, 12:22 PM
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hello

Hi,
I'm sure you have received tons of replies on the downtube folding bike already.
I just purchased a 9 speed No suspension.( XIIINS )The bike is high quality.Well worth the price.
I havent ridden it yet to comment on the ride. Will be doing so this weekend.
Tony
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Old 01-03-07, 01:39 PM
  #885  
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Originally Posted by barneybarney
hi seseamecrunch,

have you any pictures of your front deraillier set up? my chain drop has come back with a vengence ripping off the plastic chain guard. i think its time for me to solve the problem. a photo would be great to give me some guidance.
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Old 01-03-07, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by barneybarney
hi seseamecrunch,

have you any pictures of your front deraillier set up? my chain drop has come back with a vengence ripping off the plastic chain guard. i think its time for me to solve the problem. a photo would be great to give me some guidance.

nice bike by the way.

barney
Here are two photos. Just the usual FD install. Don't have cables. Also, remember to get a triple FD as I had to manually widen mine. I did 45 miles yesterday, pretty fast ride without a single problem!!!
One installation tip - I put in a longer outer limit screw and used that to control the location of the FD over the chainring. Works great.


Good luck!

Last edited by SesameCrunch; 01-03-07 at 07:38 PM.
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Old 01-03-07, 02:03 PM
  #887  
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Originally Posted by Crankypants
Well, I just fınshed a two week tour of Turkey on my modıfıed mını and ıt was a blast! The bıke handled great, and ıt was very easy to fold up and take on the dolmuş when I dıdn't want to rıde on the busıer roads. I wrıte more and post pıcs later ın a couple of days.
Where's the emoticon for "green with envy"?

I was born in Ankara, but have never visited as an adult. Please post pics and stories. I'm also very interested in your experiences touring with the Mini.
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Old 01-04-07, 01:31 AM
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Fear&Trembling and BigMacFU, many thanks for the clue on the tires --
https://schwalbetires.com/bike_tires/...n_plus_details

Though I have not had time to check it out, there seems to be a discount that folks on this list might appreciate available at
https://www.bicycletouring101.com/SchwalbeOffer.htm

Tim
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Old 01-04-07, 04:15 AM
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cheers sesemecrunch - looks great. thanks for the photos. your pics also remind me to clean my DT!
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Old 01-04-07, 07:17 AM
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Nice find Tom, that's pretty cool of schwalbe
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Old 01-04-07, 09:26 AM
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Hi Sesamecrunch,

Looks like a great set up, thanks for the pictures. I have one question though - you have a dual chainring set up (like mine), so how do you switch the chain to the smaller ring, with the deraillur in the way? Do you have to adjust the limit screws every time, or is your modified cage wide enough that it can accomodate the chain being on either ring, without changing its position?

Thanks in advance,
Morgan
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Old 01-04-07, 02:10 PM
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Morgan: I don't use the small ring at all. This crankset was one I had sitting around. I find the 53/32 combo enough to tackle everything I want to ride. I left the 39t on instead of having a loose chainring lying around the parts bin.

If I ever needed the 39, I could just use the long limit screw to adjust it.
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Old 01-07-07, 06:51 AM
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Yan provided this in another thread, but just so it's permanently catalogued in the downtube thread:

Originally Posted by downtube
I just created a quick checklist for you (and the bikeshop tech):

1. Check to make sure all quick releases are tight, especially the one on the frame and stem.
2. Check the stem to make sure it is attached properly. It is especially important to make sure the quill of the stem is tight; if it is loose it may cause the rider to lose control.
3. Check the headset to make sure it is not too tight (or loose).
4. Check brakes and make sure they are toed in to eliminate noise while braking
5. Check shifting and inspect the rear derailleur hanger.
6. Make sure the brake, derailleur, and stem bolts are tight, but not overtight.
7. Tighten (do not overtighten) crank bolts and pedals.
8. The brakes and shifter should be oriented in a comfortable manner for the rider.
9. The bar ends should be oriented upward for riders that intend on cruising slowly, they should point down for riders that want to get into an aerodynamic tuck position.
10. The stem angle should be close to +60 degrees (pointing up) for riders that want a comfortable cruiser style ride. The angle should be close to 0 degrees for aggressive faster riders. The stem can be flipped (on our 20” bikes) by removing the handlebar and orienting the stem to point inward towards the rider, and replacing the handlebar. Doing so will give the rider 60 extra degrees of adjustment…..altogether 120 of 180 degrees will be possible.
11. The saddle should have and angle between 0 and -5 (pointing down 5 degrees) degrees. A lower angle is more comfortable to sit on. However when the angle is too small the rider will slide down while riding, causing discomfort. It is best to start with a saddle at 0 degrees (parallel to the ground) and go down until the rider feels comfortable sitting with a maximum downward angle of -5 degrees.
12. The proper seatpost height is very important. Most novice cyclists ride with a seatpost that is too low. This will cause the rider to work very hard even at slow speeds, additionally it may cause knee pain. It is also unsafe for the saddle to be too high. A high saddle may allow the riders knee to lock out in a straight position while pedaling. This may cause serious knee damage, hence NEVER allow your knee to be completely straight when pedaling. Ideally a rider should have a slight knee bend while the foot is at its furthest point from his/her hip. A 35 degree angle at the bone (not the visual angle you see…. use a tool to measure) at the furthest point is optimal.
13. Check the bearings at the hubs, and bottom bracket, lube if necessary.
14. Inspect the frame, especially the swingarm on the full suspension bike. Make sure all bolts on the full suspension swingarm are tight.
15. Fill the tires with 60psi of air.
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Old 01-11-07, 07:27 AM
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Well, after reading this thread the other day I decided to try bidding on one on eBay – and I won one at a great price. I’ll report when I receive it…
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Old 01-11-07, 07:16 PM
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FOLDING SOCIETY REVIEW of Downtube IX FS


Look what I found --
FOLDING SOCIETY REVIEW of Downtube IX FS.
-- Wonderful news,, a very positive review.

https://www.foldsoc.co.uk/Mike/downtube.html
https://www.foldsoc.co.uk

Having just read the review it -- If it weren't for all the playful mods I've already done, I would be ready to trade in my VIII FS for a new one....

Big, well deserved congrats to Yan.

Bob Gruber
Dallas, Tx
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Old 01-11-07, 11:19 PM
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Good review but it basically says what we have known for a long time here on the board. The internal hub bikes are even better for my usage.
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Old 01-12-07, 12:12 AM
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After reading testimonials and seeing some modified pics here of the DT, All I can say is .....I WANT ONE TOO!
I just have to decide between the IX (rear derailleur) vs. VIIIH (internal Hub). Although I'm leaning more towards the VIIIH, I just want to know if there's any disadvantage on the internal hub set-up. Someone mentioned a "loss in efficiency" with it. ' not sure what that means.
I like the idea of maintenance free shifting, but I want to make sure I get the right one the first time.
Please help a noob.
Thanks in advance!

P.S.
My intended use for the bike is for commuting to work (12mi round trip) and maybe some light touring. I have a road bike and a comfort bike now, but I want a folder for portability. There's just no more room in the garage for another fullsize bike and my bikes are too large to be taken inside my workplace.

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Old 01-12-07, 07:55 AM
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I'm also a commuter, and I think the internal hub is a great way to go. I myself have the external, but if I were to get another DT, it'd be internal hub just for the sake of not having to worry about maintaining it as much during the wintery and rainy months.
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Old 01-12-07, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by BigMacFU
I'm also a commuter, and I think the internal hub is a great way to go. I myself have the external, but if I were to get another DT, it'd be internal hub just for the sake of not having to worry about maintaining it as much during the wintery and rainy months.
Me too. If I were to get another one, it would be the hub model for hassle-freedom.

I got the derailleur model for tinkering with and it's worked well for that purpose. BTW, I'm toying with the idea of turning my DT into a front wheel drive recumbent with a kit from www.cruzbike.com . Haven't decided for sure whether to convert an mtb or the folder, but it will be fun to do. I've ordered the kit and am waiting anxiously for its arrival.

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Old 01-12-07, 11:45 AM
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Sesame, that'll be one heck of a mod. The link is dead though, I'd like to see what that kit looks like.
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