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Old 11-26-22, 08:11 AM
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folderjohn
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new here

Hello, is this working now?
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Old 11-26-22, 08:58 AM
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Old 11-26-22, 09:02 PM
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Old 11-30-22, 04:56 AM
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folderjohn
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Originally Posted by Schwinnsta View Post
Welcome
Thank you. It took me a while to figure out I had to do the security thing before I could post.
John
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Old 11-30-22, 05:53 AM
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Yes I do have a question. I have a Dahon Espresso with 26" x 1.50" Kenda Kwest tires and they show a lot of age. Cracking / checking on the sidewalls although plenty of tread left. I make a lot of practice grocery runs learning how much I can carry and how to pack the pannier bags and top backpack. I'll be using the Espresso and, or my Dahon Eco 7 speed for getting groceries, supplies etc. when I start sailing long distance between Maine and the Caribbean. I'm trying to find a new tire 1.75 - 1.95 width that I can air up for loads and air down for just me and a beach towel. I'm 170 -180 lbs. and a payload of 50 - 70 lbs. No not all beer ! Probably some rum too ! Not a lot of info on the web sites that sell tires about max and min. air pressures and even less about load capacity. I was thinking tires made for tandem bikes, heavy riders ? I like the Schwalbe Marathon but some say 40 - 60 psi. others up to 100 psi. I'm looking for 100 + psi tires for heavy loads........... I think ? Right ? Ha ha !

I sure would appreciate any and all advice / knowledge / personal experiences everyone here can share with me.

Thank you, John Hedlund
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Old 11-30-22, 07:00 AM
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Tire pressure is pretty much a personal choice within bounds. The max pressure rating of tires is printed on the side of the tire (and available online) is half the blow off pressure (I think, though this does not matter.) It represents a hard boundary. The minimum pressure is usually on the tire, but this represents a soft boundary, to me. If you have too little pressure, you will have snakebite looking flats on your tubes without actual punctures. I tend to ride toward the softer end of the spectrum. I don't like a harsh ride. Some say there is less resistance at higher pressures. While that may be true, the harsher ride, negates the advantage. I like wide tires that are supple, with supple side walls, that tend to absorb shock. In 26 inch size, I liked Schwalbe Big Apples and Panaracer Paselas, though I do not have a 26" bike anymore. The more supple tires generally are more efficient, faster, but flat more easily. For a lot of people, tire choice becomes a compromise with tolerance to getting flat tires.
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Old 11-30-22, 07:42 AM
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Hello, Iím using Michelin Protek tires size 1,85 x 26 since September. They are on my old commuter bike and filled to 55-60 psi. I weigh about 165 lbs. I carry 25 to 50 lbs in the rear milk crate. Up to now they have performed well. Hope this helps.



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Old 11-30-22, 12:59 PM
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Originally Posted by folderjohn View Post
Yes I do have a question. I have a Dahon Espresso with 26" x 1.50" Kenda Kwest tires and they show a lot of age. Cracking / checking on the sidewalls although plenty of tread left. I make a lot of practice grocery runs learning how much I can carry and how to pack the pannier bags and top backpack. I'll be using the Espresso and, or my Dahon Eco 7 speed for getting groceries, supplies etc. when I start sailing long distance between Maine and the Caribbean. I'm trying to find a new tire 1.75 - 1.95 width that I can air up for loads and air down for just me and a beach towel. I'm 170 -180 lbs. and a payload of 50 - 70 lbs. No not all beer ! Probably some rum too ! Not a lot of info on the web sites that sell tires about max and min. air pressures and even less about load capacity. I was thinking tires made for tandem bikes, heavy riders ? I like the Schwalbe Marathon but some say 40 - 60 psi. others up to 100 psi. I'm looking for 100 + psi tires for heavy loads........... I think ? Right ? Ha ha !
Get new tires. I recommend tire widths in the 35-40mm range for the 26er and 50mm for the 20". Don't worry about the pressure range of the tire. You'll be fine as long as you keep it inflated enough to support the weight that it's carrying. If you go beyond the weight capacity of the wheel, it will show up in the spokes rather than the tire.
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Old 11-30-22, 05:49 PM
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Thank you to everyone for the replies. After doing some searching I found the Schwalbe Marathon 26 x 1.75 I'm considering will handle loads up to 109 kg. = 240 lbs. and comes with 3mm or 5mm puncture protection. Does anyone have experience with puncture protection ? I'm still looking and I hear good reviews about Continental and Kenda tires too.

John
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Old 11-30-22, 09:19 PM
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Nyah
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Originally Posted by folderjohn View Post
Thank you to everyone for the replies. After doing some searching I found the Schwalbe Marathon 26 x 1.75 I'm considering will handle loads up to 109 kg. = 240 lbs. and comes with 3mm or 5mm puncture protection. Does anyone have experience with puncture protection ? I'm still looking and I hear good reviews about Continental and Kenda tires too.

John
Any tire will handle the load that you've been talking about.

The puncture protection is a layer of additional material meant for reducing the likelihood that glass will get through to the inner tube. The tradeoff is that it makes the tire a little bit slower. The Marathons currently available also have a stiff sidewall, which additionally contributes to making the tire slower.

I have Marathon Greenguard tires on two 700c bicycles. If I rode those bicycles more often, I'd probably switch to a different tire on them. On the bicycles that I ride every day - 20" wheels - I use Big Apples due to them being a faster tire.
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