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carrying a folding bike - advice

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carrying a folding bike - advice

Old 12-04-23, 08:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN
Would a shoulder strap help take some of the weight off your arm?

I traveled by airline recently, my carry on bag (not a bike) is an older model, was made before wheels were attached to luggage, thus I use the shoulder strap that came with it.
This might help a little, but I'm not sure how it will work with the shape of my bike when folded. It feels like it might dig into my side and still require some awkward holding/leaning to be able to carry it. And I think that kind of unnatural posture I'm taking to hold my bike currently, is what is causing the issues.
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Old 12-04-23, 08:11 AM
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Originally Posted by tcs
I suggested a shoulder strap in post no. 3. Our OP seems to have rejected that suggestion out of hand without giving a reason. Ce la vie.
You did - thank you for that! I didn't mention it because you offered so many options I was focusing on the ones I thought might be more viable as I try to narrow down what the problem is with my current bike and how best to resolve it.

As I said just now, the strap option is interesting, but my gut feeling is that, even if it relieves the problem a little, it's not going to completely solve it - and I am at a point where I need to solve this problem completely as I can't currently use my bike as putting that much weight on that arm (and potentially the awkward way in which I have to hold it when carrying) is not allowing the problem to heal.
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Old 12-04-23, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by tcs
In post no. 3 I pointed out a rack that would allow the OP's existing bike to roll on casters. The OP seems to have rejected that suggestion out of hand without giving a reason.
You did point this out too! Again - thank you! And again, I didn't mention it as there were so many other helpful things in your post, I just focused on the ones that seemed the best options.

As I said above, having a rack with wheels will help at some points, but it doesn't solve having to carry the bike down stairs or escalators or through incredibly busy London stations and irritating strangers as they go to and from work. It could help for sure, but not resolve completely.
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Old 12-04-23, 08:54 AM
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The combination of a shoulder strap and a clean rectangular parallelepiped folded shape is the easiest to carry. If is lightweight, its even better.

The Brompton (+ clones, Dahon Curl...) and the Tern BYB are examples of such folding bikes.

To carry my Brompton without problem (easy of carry and stealth) I use a Radical Design cover bag specially designed for the Brompton that has a shoulder strap (+ 2 handles).
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Old 12-04-23, 01:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Jipe
The combination of a shoulder strap and a clean rectangular parallelepiped folded shape is the easiest to carry. If is lightweight, its even better.

The Brompton (+ clones, Dahon Curl...) and the Tern BYB are examples of such folding bikes.

To carry my Brompton without problem (easy of carry and stealth) I use a Radical Design cover bag specially designed for the Brompton that has a shoulder strap (+ 2 handles).
What is a Brompton like to carry without the bag or shoulder strap? Or do you think a shoulder strap is essential for being able to carry with ease?

I also have to carry a quite large backpack with my work stuff in it - primarily laptop and change of clothes - so can I carry a shoulder strapped bike with a backpack already on?
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Old 12-04-23, 04:40 PM
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Its possible to carry the Brompton with shoulder strap but its easier to use a shoulder strap for instance if it must be carried on a long distance.

The bag is useful when its better not to show that its a folding bike.

I never tried to carry the Brompton with a shoulder strap + a backpack, so I do not really know if it is a good solution, but I am afraid it won't work well because when carrying my Brompton in the bag with the shoulder strap, its often on the side of my back where the backpack will also be..
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Old 12-06-23, 05:19 AM
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Originally Posted by bunyboy
...
I also have to carry a quite large backpack with my work stuff in it - primarily laptop and change of clothes - so can I carry a shoulder strapped bike with a backpack already on?
I have carried luggage (not a bike) with a shoulder strap for distances that I would not have wanted to just hold the luggage with my hand, while wearing a small light backpack. Am using my hand and elbow of that arm to try to keep the strap from sliding off my shoulder.

It is not an ideal solution, but it beats hanging on to it with your hand.

I prefer a large backpack with two shoulder straps for serious distances with a large heavy bit of luggage, but I doubt you want to have a custom made backpack made that holds your bike.

I am not familiar with your bike model, and I am not going to research it. My Airnimal Joey with 24 inch wheels would be too big when folded to try to carry it with a shoulder strap. I am only willing to carry my Joey for short distances, several tens of meters is ok but not several hundreds of meters.
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Old 01-09-24, 03:39 AM
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Original post:

The video in post 3 on wheeling a Dahon is excellent. However I would add: If you can wheel it folded, you can often wheel it unfolded, it wheels better, and it may carry up stairs better; When folded and the handlebar or seat up, you may be better able to pull it up stairs. But if not, when unfolded, you can lift part of the weight with your back hand (I lift at the seatstay behind the seatpost, rather than relying on friction by grabbing the seat post), and part of the weight with your front hand, by grabbing around the handlebar stem low, where it is larger diameter and easier to grip and steer if necessary. The front is lower weight, so easier to rely on friction from your grip to lift. However, my aft hand is that far back, because my bike is very heavy aft with loaded panniers; With an empty bike, you may be able to lift with your back hand by grasping the large monobeam forward of the seat tube. And as suggested, yes, you can attach a carry strap to the seat stay aft, and around the stem base forward, and sling the strap over your shoulder, to take all the weight there. Just make sure you keep the strap away from the chain area, to stay clean, and not jam up the drivetrain.
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