Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Folding Bikes
Reload this Page >

Commuter Xootr computer tutor

Notices
Folding Bikes Discuss the unique features and issues of folding bikes. Also a great place to learn what folding bike will work best for your needs.

Commuter Xootr computer tutor

Old 07-21-08, 01:08 PM
  #51  
Drops small screws
Thread Starter
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC Metro Area
Posts: 2,604

Bikes: Soma Grand Randonneur, modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL with broken brifter from running it into a hotel porte-cochère

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by tblott3
Pictures, please!
I'll do you one better than that...
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
noteon is offline  
Old 07-21-08, 01:34 PM
  #52  
Archiboy
 
tblott3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: GRR
Posts: 63

Bikes: 08 Xootr Swift, 06 Kona Smoke

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by noteon
It was David Lee. Thanks.
tblott3 is offline  
Old 07-21-08, 02:07 PM
  #53  
Drops small screws
Thread Starter
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC Metro Area
Posts: 2,604

Bikes: Soma Grand Randonneur, modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL with broken brifter from running it into a hotel porte-cochère

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by invisiblehand
Thanks for the pointer to that rack. I never heard of it. Do you like the "quick release" mechanism of the pin? Does it mount well to the seat and/or handlebar post?
The pin is a pretty stiff fit. It doesn't go in as easily as you might expect. But there's also no apparent play in that joint. Yes, it does mount well.

I don't think I like it in front, though--it's heavy enough to significantly reduce maneuverability when it's mounted there. Has anyone found a good front-wheel rack for these bikes?

if the tire pressure is the same as it was on your Matrix, your contact patch is the same.
Is that true even if it's a smaller wheel?

But what I was really getting at was 110-psi skinny tires vs. 70-psi fat tires. I don't think I'd want to attempt this hill with the smaller, harder contact patch of those faster tires while hauling a trailer--especially in foul weather.
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
noteon is offline  
Old 07-21-08, 02:14 PM
  #54  
SERENITY NOW!!!
 
jyossarian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: In the 212
Posts: 8,738

Bikes: Haro Vector, IRO Rob Roy, Bianchi Veloce

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
The contact patch varies depending on the psi the tires are inflated too. So if you weigh 200 lbs and your tires are at 100 psi, then the contact patch is 2 sq. in. If the psi is at 70, the contact patch is about 3 sq. in. That's the simplified version not taking into account how the load is distributed between front and rear, but you get the idea.
__________________
HHCMF - Take pride in your ability to amaze lesser mortals! - MikeR



We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty!
jyossarian is offline  
Old 07-21-08, 02:20 PM
  #55  
Drops small screws
Thread Starter
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC Metro Area
Posts: 2,604

Bikes: Soma Grand Randonneur, modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL with broken brifter from running it into a hotel porte-cochère

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by jyossarian
The contact patch varies depending on the psi the tires are inflated too. So if you weigh 200 lbs and your tires are at 100 psi, then the contact patch is 2 sq. in. If the psi is at 70, the contact patch is about 3 sq. in. That's the simplified version not taking into account how the load is distributed between front and rear, but you get the idea.
Doesn't it also vary depending on the manufactured dimensions of the tire and the size of the wheel?
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
noteon is offline  
Old 07-21-08, 06:15 PM
  #56  
Archiboy
 
tblott3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: GRR
Posts: 63

Bikes: 08 Xootr Swift, 06 Kona Smoke

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by noteon
I don't think I like it in front, though--it's heavy enough to significantly reduce maneuverability when it's mounted there. Has anyone found a good front-wheel rack for these bikes?
Is the rack itself heavy, or is it that bug bag that's heavy?

I've looked all over for a good front rack solution and was just about to look to a custom fab solution when I came across your post with the crossrack. The crossrack is the best solution I've seen.
tblott3 is offline  
Old 07-21-08, 06:37 PM
  #57  
Archiboy
 
tblott3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: GRR
Posts: 63

Bikes: 08 Xootr Swift, 06 Kona Smoke

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I was also thinking of trying one of the Sherpas as it seems you can strap them to the fork as opposed to the brakes.

https://www.oldmanmountain.com/Pages/...rontRacks.html

It seems like it would ride higher than intended but that you could get a wider variety of bags to work. Not being much of a bike tinkerer, it was an experiment I was hoping to avoid with the Crossrack.
tblott3 is offline  
Old 07-21-08, 06:52 PM
  #58  
Drops small screws
Thread Starter
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC Metro Area
Posts: 2,604

Bikes: Soma Grand Randonneur, modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL with broken brifter from running it into a hotel porte-cochère

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by tblott3
Is the rack itself heavy, or is it that bug bag that's heavy?
The bag. I mean, the rack has some weight, but the bag, loaded with laptop, clothing, phone/tools/credit cards/inner tube/lock, is 17 pounds. There's some significant inertia to overcome when turning.

I also discovered the Crossrack, when mounted on the steering tube, actually works against me when I'm trying to walk the bike up that one &^%!!! hill. (I didn't feel confident enough to try to pedal up it this evening after 2 hours on the bike in 90° weather, or whatever it was.) When the Crossrack and Bug were on the seatpost, I was able to push the bike up the hill with significant effort, but no panic. When they're on the front, the back wheel comes off the pavement as I walk it up by the handlebars, so I'm pushing a rig that consists of one front wheel and two trailer wheels. The back wheel became just part of a unicycle trailer hitch.

("Walk it up by the handlebars" is a polite phrase for what was more like extending my arms as far as possible and getting my body as close to parallel with the hill as practicable.)

I don't have a solution for this yet, but it was slightly scary when I realized what was going on, and that the only things preventing the trailer from rolling backwards down the hill were the front brake and my body. It took a while to get to the top.
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538

Last edited by noteon; 07-21-08 at 06:57 PM.
noteon is offline  
Old 07-21-08, 07:59 PM
  #59  
Part-time epistemologist
 
invisiblehand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 5,870

Bikes: Jamis Nova, Bike Friday triplet, Bike Friday NWT, STRIDA, Austro Daimler Vent Noir, Hollands Tourer

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 122 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by noteon
Is that true even if it's a smaller wheel?

But what I was really getting at was 110-psi skinny tires vs. 70-psi fat tires. I don't think I'd want to attempt this hill with the smaller, harder contact patch of those faster tires while hauling a trailer--especially in foul weather.
Well, my caveat is that I am no physicist nor engineer. I spent my two semesters of physics thinking about girls. It just turns out that I have a knack for taking tests.

As you are probably already aware, PSI = pounds per square inch. Therefore, to get a square inch contact patch on a tire inflated to 100 psi, you need 100 pounds of force. There might be other factors associated with tire construction that I am omitting. But I would be the wrong person to explain it or confirm it. What will change with a smaller/fatter tire is the shape of the contact patch. One of the reasons why fatter tires will have less rolling resistance than skinny tires if you held tire construction constant.

https://www.schwalbetires.com/tech_in...ing_resistance
__________________
A narrative on bicycle driving.
invisiblehand is offline  
Old 07-21-08, 08:07 PM
  #60  
Part-time epistemologist
 
invisiblehand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 5,870

Bikes: Jamis Nova, Bike Friday triplet, Bike Friday NWT, STRIDA, Austro Daimler Vent Noir, Hollands Tourer

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 122 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by noteon
The bag. I mean, the rack has some weight, but the bag, loaded with laptop, clothing, phone/tools/credit cards/inner tube/lock, is 17 pounds. There's some significant inertia to overcome when turning.

I also discovered the Crossrack, when mounted on the steering tube, actually works against me when I'm trying to walk the bike up that one &^%!!! hill. (I didn't feel confident enough to try to pedal up it this evening after 2 hours on the bike in 90° weather, or whatever it was.) When the Crossrack and Bug were on the seatpost, I was able to push the bike up the hill with significant effort, but no panic. When they're on the front, the back wheel comes off the pavement as I walk it up by the handlebars, so I'm pushing a rig that consists of one front wheel and two trailer wheels. The back wheel became just part of a unicycle trailer hitch.

("Walk it up by the handlebars" is a polite phrase for what was more like extending my arms as far as possible and getting my body as close to parallel with the hill as practicable.)

I don't have a solution for this yet, but it was slightly scary when I realized what was going on, and that the only things preventing the trailer from rolling backwards down the hill were the front brake and my body. It took a while to get to the top.
Have you thought about mounting it to the head tube ala Brompton?
__________________
A narrative on bicycle driving.
invisiblehand is offline  
Old 07-21-08, 08:14 PM
  #61  
Drops small screws
Thread Starter
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC Metro Area
Posts: 2,604

Bikes: Soma Grand Randonneur, modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL with broken brifter from running it into a hotel porte-cochère

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by invisiblehand
Have you thought about mounting it to the head tube ala Brompton?
Oops. I think I've been using the wrong term. The steering tube goes inside the head tube--so I've been mounting it to the head tube.

I'll put it back on the seatpost for tomorrow's commute (which is sans children) and do some pondering.
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
noteon is offline  
Old 07-21-08, 10:01 PM
  #62  
jur
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Albany, WA
Posts: 7,393
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 321 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by noteon
Oops. I think I've been using the wrong term. The steering tube goes inside the head tube--so I've been mounting it to the head tube.
The head tube is the frame part, the steerer tube is the upper part of the fork, the word you're after is not clearly defined for folders, but for the Swift riser tube, stem riser or something along those lines will be it. Dahon call theirs a handlepost, but functionally it is slightly different.
jur is offline  
Old 07-22-08, 11:44 AM
  #63  
Drops small screws
Thread Starter
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC Metro Area
Posts: 2,604

Bikes: Soma Grand Randonneur, modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL with broken brifter from running it into a hotel porte-cochère

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Ah, thanks.

One thing I'm still not used to is the lack of a top tube that can rest against the inside of my leg while I'm standing. The Swift has fallen over half a dozen times while I was getting a drink of water or talking to somebody.
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
noteon is offline  
Old 07-22-08, 06:07 PM
  #64  
Drops small screws
Thread Starter
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC Metro Area
Posts: 2,604

Bikes: Soma Grand Randonneur, modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL with broken brifter from running it into a hotel porte-cochère

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
I discovered today that the rear right brake pad has been rubbing not just the rim, but the tire. I first noticed a sort of low-level buzz (that I couldn't track down) at certain moments during my commute yesterday, so I'm guessing this is a recent development--maybe from when David Lee kicked my bike over.

The tire looks OK, but here's my question. Are the stock brakes on the Swift any more finicky than other brakes? I've followed online directions for brake adjustment several times, and just have a hard time moving this pad away from the rim. The spring adjustment screw doesn't seem to do anything at all, and if I bend the spring, the difference is minimal.

This also happened when I took it out of the suitcase and put it back together on its first flight away from home. Eventually I got it so it wasn't rubbing, but I never got it adjusted the way I liked it.

Not being as young and omniscient as I used to be, I'm more than prepared to chalk this up to the mechanic's incompetence--but first I want to make sure I'm not up against an actual thing that doesn't work right. Anybody have difficulty adjusting these?
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
noteon is offline  
Old 07-22-08, 06:23 PM
  #65  
jur
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Albany, WA
Posts: 7,393
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 321 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Swift brakes are standard. It could be that the spring is located in the wrong hole of the brake boss mounting plate - check, there should be 3 holes for choosing different spring tensions. Perhaps yours are not matched. If they are, then you could step up the tension by selecting the next hole for the spring end to locate in.

Cheap V-brakes also have a tendency to break and lose their proper operation. No amount of adjustment will get them going properly. Since brakes are so important safety-wise, it is worth getting a good set.
jur is offline  
Old 07-22-08, 06:45 PM
  #66  
Drops small screws
Thread Starter
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC Metro Area
Posts: 2,604

Bikes: Soma Grand Randonneur, modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL with broken brifter from running it into a hotel porte-cochère

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
So these are cheap ones? If so, I think I'll just replace them. I'm towing precious cargo.

Time to get the Kool-Stops on there too, now that I think of it...

BTW, I like your website.
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
noteon is offline  
Old 07-22-08, 07:48 PM
  #67  
Drops small screws
Thread Starter
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC Metro Area
Posts: 2,604

Bikes: Soma Grand Randonneur, modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL with broken brifter from running it into a hotel porte-cochère

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
OK, I got down on the floor with it, turned all the lights on, and unhooked one of the springs... but I don't see the three holes.
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
noteon is offline  
Old 07-22-08, 07:58 PM
  #68  
jur
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Albany, WA
Posts: 7,393
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 321 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
The 3 holes are not on the brake arm but on the stud mount on the bike frame itself. You have to undo the bolt that holds the v-brake to the stud and pull it off to see the 3 holes and adjust the setting. It might be that yours doesn't have the 3 holes but I have never seen one without.
jur is offline  
Old 07-22-08, 08:02 PM
  #69  
Drops small screws
Thread Starter
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC Metro Area
Posts: 2,604

Bikes: Soma Grand Randonneur, modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL with broken brifter from running it into a hotel porte-cochère

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Thanks. I'll check it out tomorrow morning.

I did notice, while I was down there, that the combination of repeated cable adjustments and heel strikes has finally broken the cable off at the securing nut. *sigh*
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
noteon is offline  
Old 07-22-08, 09:28 PM
  #70  
Senior Member
 
alhedges's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Naptown
Posts: 1,133

Bikes: NWT 24sp DD; Brompton M6R

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
I have never really found the spring adjustments to help much when I have brake rubbing problems; those I usually have to fix by loosening the securing nut, adding a tiny bit of cable back in, and then fine tuning by using the knurled adjustment knob by the brake levers.
alhedges is offline  
Old 07-25-08, 09:30 AM
  #71  
Drops small screws
Thread Starter
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC Metro Area
Posts: 2,604

Bikes: Soma Grand Randonneur, modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL with broken brifter from running it into a hotel porte-cochère

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
I dropped the bike off at Chelsea Bicycles after taking the boys to preschool. If they can get the work done by the time I need to pick the boys back up from preschool, it'll have new brakes installed today.

Taken this morning, just before snapping down the mesh cover and heading out:

__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
noteon is offline  
Old 07-25-08, 10:47 AM
  #72  
Senior Member
 
what bike?'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 338
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
nice you seem to be doing a good job modding that xootr, its a nice bike shame i cant afford one after buying the trek, if i was to get another folding bike after the trek i would look at one of those , you children seem to enjoy the bike rides in the back
what bike? is offline  
Old 07-25-08, 10:55 AM
  #73  
Drops small screws
Thread Starter
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC Metro Area
Posts: 2,604

Bikes: Soma Grand Randonneur, modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL with broken brifter from running it into a hotel porte-cochère

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by what bike?
nice you seem to be doing a good job modding that xootr, its a nice bike shame i cant afford one after buying the trek, if i was to get another folding bike after the trek i would look at one of those , you children seem to enjoy the bike rides in the back
They love it. The usual refrain (repeated endlessly, the way toddler demons torment the evil in the fifteenth circle of Hell) is No preschool! Daddy, I don't want to go to preschool! No preschool! I don't want preschool! No preschool! No preschool, Daddy! No preschool!

Then I say, "Who wants to go to preschool in the bike trailer?"

And there's one more No preschool... as the new thought works its way through the little brain cells...

Bike trairer! Bike trairer! We go to preschool in the bike trairer! Come on, Daddy! Come on, let's go! Let's go in the bike trairer!

Thanks for the comment about the mods. I feel like this is the first time I have enough experience and information to make a bike into something that suits my needs. Now if I can just do the same for the trailer as they approach its weight limit...
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538

Last edited by noteon; 07-25-08 at 01:57 PM.
noteon is offline  
Old 07-25-08, 06:13 PM
  #74  
Drops small screws
Thread Starter
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC Metro Area
Posts: 2,604

Bikes: Soma Grand Randonneur, modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL with broken brifter from running it into a hotel porte-cochère

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
We made it up the goddamn hill today.

I just wanted to say.
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
noteon is offline  
Old 07-26-08, 02:30 AM
  #75  
Senior Member
 
what bike?'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 338
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
congratulationson getting up the hill, and its nice to see you've came up with a solution to your children getting in a mood with you because your making them go to school
what bike? is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.