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Everest full size folding mountain bike

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Everest full size folding mountain bike

Old 09-02-08, 10:35 PM
  #1  
Mervic
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Everest full size folding mountain bike

Hello everyone. Found this at e-bay. Anyone know any history about this brand of folder? Looks like it is a new bargain brand foldie, but full size and DS with disc brakes. Must have come from China or Taiwan. Check link https://cgi.ebay.ca/26-EVEREST-Foldin...ayphotohosting
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Old 09-03-08, 09:41 AM
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There isn't any info on these that I know of. Looks like a typical Asian import bargain folding bike. Nothing special about the components. It's neat that it has disc brakes, but it is otherwise unremarkable.

That said, if cared for well, the bike might work fine for someone that desires a full-sized folding bike. It really depends on your needs and financial situation. At the very least owning a bike like this will allow a person to learn what they actual do and do not like. So when they go to purchase another bike, they'll be more likely to get exactly what they want.

--sam
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Old 09-03-08, 12:54 PM
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It looks like an overweight piece of garbage that's designed to appeal to people who don't know their bikes. It is grossly overpriced for what it is.

1. Suspension - to get a decent suspension front and rear costs about $300 an end. Cheap suspension bobs up and down when you are pedalling and sucks all the energy from your body. You can get a better quality ride by buying a bike with no suspension and fitting fatter tyres. There's no cheap shortcut to good suspension.

2. Weight - a folder should be light. It's supposed to be a transportable bike. Think in terms of no heavier than around the mid 20lbs (and preferably lower) if you intend to use it as designed. I doubt that bike would weigh less than 35lbs.

3. Bearings & wheels - cheap bikes have cheap bearings and poor quality wheels. If you get much more than 200 miles out of them you're doing well. The wheels are throwaway items because you can rarely adjust the tension because the soft spoke nipples round off and defy adjustment.

There is not a component on it that an experienced biker would put on his bike.

end of rant
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Old 09-03-08, 01:14 PM
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Tell us how you really feel. LOL

--sam
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Old 09-03-08, 05:46 PM
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Och, I got fed up of seeing inexperienced people being conned into buying something shiny with superficially attractive specs on the internet when it is something they wouldn't see in a reputable bike shop.

The other factor is that a bike requires a proper predelivery inspection and tuneup (PDI) which takes time. An inexperienced buyer won't have the skills or tools to do this (if they did, they wouldn't be buying one of these bikes). Bike shops in my area would be likely to refuse to do a PDI on a bike of this type because they would not want the responsibility of the inevitable problems that would come - "You prepared it, now it's broken, it must be your fault etc"

In the trade it's called a BSO (Bike Shaped Object) which is not to be confused with an actual bike.

Now someone is going to post to say they bought one last Xmas and have done 50,000 miles on it without a problem
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Old 09-03-08, 06:26 PM
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Originally Posted by datako View Post
Och, I got fed up of seeing inexperienced people being conned into buying something shiny with superficially attractive specs on the internet when it is something they wouldn't see in a reputable bike shop.

The other factor is that a bike requires a proper predelivery inspection and tuneup (PDI) which takes time. An inexperienced buyer won't have the skills or tools to do this (if they did, they wouldn't be buying one of these bikes). Bike shops in my area would be likely to refuse to do a PDI on a bike of this type because they would not want the responsibility of the inevitable problems that would come - "You prepared it, now it's broken, it must be your fault etc"

In the trade it's called a BSO (Bike Shaped Object) which is not to be confused with an actual bike.

Now someone is going to post to say they bought one last Xmas and have done 50,000 miles on it without a problem
While I'm sure we all greatly appreciate the input of knowledgeable people like yourself, I don't necessarily think it's good advice to appeal to what one would find at a typical reputable bike shop.

Bike shops (and the entire bike industry in general) tend to be very insular and you won't likely see many folders at all at most reputable bike shops. In fact, many reputable bike shops would also likely refuse to work on folding bikes because it just isn't worth their effort to stock the parts and learn how to work on them properly when 99% of all their business consists of the more popular mountain or road bikes.

While this Everest folding bike is no doubt as bad as you say, I'd just like to put out the fact that the Downtube brand is a forum favorite plagued by many of the same issues you have raised: cheap suspension, weight (30+ pounds for some models), and wheels that are lacking.
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Old 09-03-08, 07:07 PM
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I want it so I can have some exercise while enjoying the last of the summer weeks. I am not using it to go to work or do errands. If it is heavy, better for toning my upper body and arms when I am lifting it out of my car. Too heavy for going uphill, good for my leg muscles. If everything is going to be easy and light for me, I will not get enough workout. Dont get me wrong, I do desire a Birdy or a Moulton or even a Brompton foldie. All out of my budget. I like Dahons too but it is still outside of my price range. I cannot spend a lot of money on bikes. I agree with datako, that if you know nothing about bicycle and have no tools to fix it, stay away from this BSO. As for me as an inexperience people and no tools (refering to datako's comment), I have enough tools in my garage to strip a whole car of every nuts and bolts, cept for truing a wheel, getting one soon. I also have an automotive background, fast learner and love anything mechanical even this POS BSO, hehehe. This type of rant happens a lot in automotive forums, not new to me. I am sorry, I did not started this thread to upset anyone in this forum.
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Old 09-04-08, 02:20 AM
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Hi Mervic, no-one is upset, just trying to save you from some grief.

Obviously the mechanical side of it won't be a problem to you. However I suggest you make sure all the bearings are correctly adjusted and greased before you start. Bottom brackets, headsets, and pedals are often over-tightened, and out of a possible desire by the manufacturer to save the world's scanty oil reserves, often scantily lubricated.

You will need some bike specific tools - I suggest a crank remover and a bottom bracket tool are worthwhile.

The wheels are where even a mechanically competent person is likely to run into problems. Unless you replace all the soft alloy nipples with brass right at the start, some will seize and frustrate any attempts to true the wheel later. Making sure it is adequately tensioned and true from day one is the best way to make it last longer and hopefully the nipples won't be seized yet. Machine built wheels usually need some human intervention to make them good wheels.

I'll try to find a link to a PDI form so you know what to do when you get it.

You'll have to put a fair amount of work into it before you start, but you won't be paying the labour cost that it would cost an ordinary buyer.

I would still recommend if you are buying a BSO to get the simplest possible one, ie no suspension (get fatter tyres instead) and if you really want exercise get a singlespeed. It's hard for the manufacturers to stuff that up.

As for the comparison to car forums - fortunately the car industry doesn't have anything as bad as a BSO (more regulated) or I'd probably be driving it
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Old 09-04-08, 02:30 AM
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Mervic, perhaps you could aim for a used folder; these are very often lightly used, so almost new, but you'll save a heap and get a better quality folder.
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Old 09-04-08, 05:02 PM
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Originally Posted by jur View Post
Mervic, perhaps you could aim for a used folder; these are very often lightly used, so almost new, but you'll save a heap and get a better quality folder.
I am a frequent visitor of craiglist and e-bay also kijiji websites, hoping I will find a quality folder, locally. They have good folders but mostly Raleigh 20's and/or old dahons. Found a Brompton locally selling for a $1000 and the seller said it is half what she paid, ouch!!! Didn't realize a new Brompton may cost a couple of grand. I would love to get my hands on a 20 as a project (or a Moulton like Sesame's) but cant give up most of my time wrenching, plus the wifey will not agree. BTW, I did bought a Schwinn folder with 6 speed, 20" tires for a good price which I started using earlier in the summer but I gave it to my wife so I can convince her to save for my Downtube. I also have a China made folder for my eight year old(she's a novice on bike riding), which I have to literally taken apart to adjust everything and lube just what datako was pointing out in his last post(couldn't agree more), making it safe and rideable. I even thought of redoing the welds on the frame (looks like a wire feed welder was used) using a tig welder. That experience gave me some knowledge how things are working in a bicycle, plus Sheldon Browns very informative website. Spent some more money for helmets (bought 3), accessories and a little bike for my 4 year old. I will probably invest on wheel truing tool (saw one in e-bay). They said if you can make your wheel perfect, it seperate the men from the boys, hehehe!!! Datako, if you find the link, please post it. Thanks for the advice guys. I will probably save my funds till next summer for a much better bike, a folder of course.
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Old 09-04-08, 06:07 PM
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I haven't been able to find the link, but in the UK a PDI is done to the standards of BS6102 Pt1, 1992.

I'll keep looking for a link.

I was given a copy of the form, but as it is proprietary information I can't publish it. Maybe it will be ok to paraphrase it, but I'm not sure.
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Old 05-21-21, 06:38 AM
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Old post

Originally Posted by datako View Post
It looks like an overweight piece of garbage that's designed to appeal to people who don't know their bikes. It is grossly overpriced for what it is.

1. Suspension - to get a decent suspension front and rear costs about $300 an end. Cheap suspension bobs up and down when you are pedalling and sucks all the energy from your body. You can get a better quality ride by buying a bike with no suspension and fitting fatter tyres. There's no cheap shortcut to good suspension.

2. Weight - a folder should be light. It's supposed to be a transportable bike. Think in terms of no heavier than around the mid 20lbs (and preferably lower) if you intend to use it as designed. I doubt that bike would weigh less than 35lbs.

3. Bearings & wheels - cheap bikes have cheap bearings and poor quality wheels. If you get much more than 200 miles out of them you're doing well. The wheels are throwaway items because you can rarely adjust the tension because the soft spoke nipples round off and defy adjustment.

There is not a component on it that an experienced biker would put on his bike.

end of rant
I bought on to throw in the car and ride around the local airfield where I fly
yep rough tracks and 13 years and several 1000 miles still going Strong!!
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Old 11-26-22, 05:54 AM
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Originally Posted by datako View Post
It looks like an overweight piece of garbage that's designed to appeal to people who don't know their bikes. It is grossly overpriced for what it is.

1. Suspension - to get a decent suspension front and rear costs about $300 an end. Cheap suspension bobs up and down when you are pedalling and sucks all the energy from your body. You can get a better quality ride by buying a bike with no suspension and fitting fatter tyres. There's no cheap shortcut to good suspension.

2. Weight - a folder should be light. It's supposed to be a transportable bike. Think in terms of no heavier than around the mid 20lbs (and preferably lower) if you intend to use it as designed. I doubt that bike would weigh less than 35lbs.

3. Bearings & wheels - cheap bikes have cheap bearings and poor quality wheels. If you get much more than 200 miles out of them you're doing well. The wheels are throwaway items because you can rarely adjust the tension because the soft spoke nipples round off and defy adjustment.

There is not a component on it that an experienced biker would put on his bike.

end of rant
Ha bought this to put in car and take to Airfield,but partner uses it now, about 4500 miles in the last 3years alone and 15 years ,same bearings ,same wheels goes well
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