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Old 04-07-10, 11:00 PM   #1
prtyich
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Upgrade from Jack to Speed Pro TT

Well, I've had my Dahon Jack 2008 for 3 years of 3/4 day per week riding and while it is a workhorse, and does a good job soaking up the potholes and lousy roads in my city, it is not a long-distance bike - and is far from fast.

I am considering the speed TT because it is a much faster bike, and would allow for much longer rides should I choose to do more than the 14-18 miles I usually do. I would probably end up primarily using the TT, with the Jack relegated to backup status.

The only concerns I have are related to my lack of expertise with bikes; I bought the Jack, get it serviced every few months at the LBS, and that's it. I do not know how to adjust the bike parts like the derailler or brakes, nor do I really want to. So if the TT is a high maintenance bike needing alot of "in the field" tuning, it might not be a fit - which is why I looked at bikes with internal hubs, for instance, that are almost free of maintenance.

Does anyone have any thoughts about upgrading to a 2010 TT? Anyone have any experiences with it positive/negative?
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Old 04-07-10, 11:09 PM   #2
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wow every few months a tune up at the LBS, you are more diligent than most of us. and if you keep up that schedule I don't think you will have a problem at all with that speed tt which is a lighter and faster bike. I doubt you'll need to stray too far from your usual tune up schedule cause the higher end components should work even better between tune ups.
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Old 04-07-10, 11:22 PM   #3
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i've just upgraded from the 2007 jack to the 2009 MuSL at the beginning of this year, and i had similar worries. i was also using my jack several days each week commuting. i was concerned that the higher end components of the MuSL translated to higher maintenance as well, but after a three months of commuting, i haven't had or seen any noticeable problems. it's similar high grade component levels in the TT. at the time it was a toss up to go for the TT or the SL. i chose the SL because i wanted the lighter bike instead.

one of the worries that was raised by some others is the ProKinetix wheels - which the SP TT shares with the SL (front anyways). some other owners have complained about the spokes losing tension. i've estimated around 800 km since i got my bike, and the wheels are fine and true.

i have been fairly diligent to wipe down the bike after wet rides, checking and lubricating the components every other weekend but nothing out of the ordinary. i have noticed some tire wear but i figure that's from one part of the commute that i have to travel over a stretch of gravel road.

but if i had any mechanical work to be done, i would get it done by my friend who is a bike mechanic, or otherwise i would bring it down to the lbs. but so far nothing of that sort is needed.

Last edited by badrad; 04-07-10 at 11:29 PM.
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Old 04-07-10, 11:26 PM   #4
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wow every few months a tune up at the LBS, you are more diligent than most of us. and if you keep up that schedule I don't think you will have a problem at all with that speed tt which is a lighter and faster bike. I doubt you'll need to stray too far from your usual tune up schedule cause the higher end components should work even better between tune ups.
All I get done is a brake tightening and a minor tune-up/tightening of the derailler, that's it.

I avoid big potholes with my Jack, but am not easy on it at all. I fear that riding the TT as aggressively will not be good for the bike, which appears to be much more delicate.

Also, I did test drive a 20" first before the Jack, and felt the 20" was a toy, wobbly, etc. Maybe the TT is a more solid, stable bike, will have to test drive it...
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Old 04-07-10, 11:43 PM   #5
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I avoid big potholes with my Jack, but am not easy on it at all. I fear that riding the TT as aggressively will not be good for the bike, which appears to be much more delicate.
same here. i do know my riding style has changed with the SL than with the jack. with the wheels being such an expensive element to the bike I have been really careful not to hop curbs or do major off road that i wouldn't think twice about while on the jack.
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Old 04-08-10, 03:04 AM   #6
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i don't think there would be more of an issue with a higher spec bike other than the complexity of a twin gear system. My Hammerhead needed less care and adjustment than my Speed D7 with its 'old-fashioned' cup 'n cone bearings. Usually on a new bike, cables stretch early on, spoke tension needs checking with the first ten hours or so, then little changes other than brake pad and (slow) chain/sprocket/rim/bearing wear. While you wouldn't necessarily need to get involved in maintenance, an aural/finger check for spoke tension once a week wouldn't hurt and would spot loose spokes before you needed a dealer.

The rest you'd feel if it needed adjustment. Turning the bike upside down occasionally and spinning the wheels and cranks picks up bearing noises, the rest is very simple to spot, if not to fix.

Leaping off rocks or Jack-sized potholes on a TT though, would be out, I think. If the roads in your 'hood are lousy and potholed, you're going to have to be choosy where you ride, as a TT owner with a spoke-eating rear-wheel in London posted on the Dahon forum a few weeks ago. The other downside is narrow high pressure tyres and harsh(er) rides. The upside is a fast bike.

Last edited by snafu21; 04-08-10 at 03:56 AM. Reason: potholes
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Old 04-08-10, 07:08 AM   #7
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I'm wondering since you still want to upgrade to a faster road bike and still have it folding have you checked out the cadenza around the same road bike category as their speed pro tt? the components aren't as high end and as slick looking but higher than the Jack and you can keep those 26 inch tire sizes if your roads are pretty bad else you'll have to baby the bike to work cause of the wheels.

Even for me with my silly strida I ride around the curb to the level off cause of the mono fork instead of just not even thinking twice and flying it off the curb with my full size bike. Else my ride is on some pretty smooth residential roads on the way to work.
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Old 04-08-10, 11:07 AM   #8
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If you like the speed TT go and buy it and enjoy the ride.
But if you want some more to choose, you might take a look at the Airnimal Joey.
Why?
I was also looking for a faster folding bike beside the Brompton. Did think of many bikes ( one of them was the TT ) and choose the Joey and it's great.
It's fast and I really like to bike on it. ( No, no, the Airnimal boys don't pay me for saying so . . .)
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Old 04-08-10, 12:47 PM   #9
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If you like the speed TT go and buy it and enjoy the ride.
But if you want some more to choose, you might take a look at the Airnimal Joey.
Why?
I was also looking for a faster folding bike beside the Brompton. Did think of many bikes ( one of them was the TT ) and choose the Joey and it's great.
It's fast and I really like to bike on it. ( No, no, the Airnimal boys don't pay me for saying so . . .)
yeah i really would have liked to buy the Chameleon. but in canada it has to be imported in, there was no shop i could go in and give it a try. but yeah, the airnimal bikes are very very nice.
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Old 04-08-10, 01:23 PM   #10
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Have you considered any of the Dahon 20" Midtown bikes? It might be a better alternative if this is going to be a long distance bike while the Jack is an errand bike.

More generally, the bike will take less of a beating with wider and lower pressure tires. My experience is that the more conventional wheel sets are more robust too. Along those lines, if a Speed or Mu fits you well and you want the greater compactness of Dahon's traditional folding bikes, perhaps you might give Thor a call and see whether he can cook up a suped-up version with a front derailer, more traditional wheels, and double crank in the front.
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Old 04-08-10, 01:28 PM   #11
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I am looking at this one from Thor http://www.thorusa.com/dahon/2008/cadenza8.htm, But this one is also tempting http://www.thorusa.com/dahon/2008/curvesl.htm
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Old 04-11-10, 08:26 AM   #12
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I took the TT on a test ride yesterday around the block at my LBS, and went around 3 times. First time, felt a little off, second - starting to get the hang of it, third - felt good, and could even change gears correctly.

The whole system of 3 tiers of gears with 9 levels within each tier, for a total of 27 possible settings, was a bit complex for my tiny brain, but I can see how it is just a matter of experience.

I was surprised at how lightweight the bike is, and how thin the tires are - yet how comfortable a ride it is. I intentionally took it over bumps and potholes, and while it does not absorb/laugh them off the way the Jack does - it handled them pretty well. I would guess that alot of those really thin-wheel racing bikes would not have fared so well over some of the exposed rough cobble stone I rode the bike over.

I also tried a true 700cc Trek bike, and just don't like having to lean forward so far. That is one thing I really like about the Dahon urban/road bikes (except for the Tournado, which is their racing bike), the seating position is more vertical, which is better for my back.

I am pretty set on the TT, now its just a matter of finding $1,500... ;(
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Old 04-11-10, 09:28 AM   #13
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A little cheaper http://www.thorusa.com/dahon/2008/speedprott.htm
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Old 04-11-10, 06:39 PM   #14
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I saw this but its the older version with the older brakes, steel frame instead of aluminum, etc.
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Old 04-12-10, 08:43 AM   #15
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I put the descriptions side by side to check the difference and see what you mean. I was surprised that there was only a 1.4 pound difference betwee the two. I didnt realize that they were aluminum now.
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Old 04-12-10, 11:29 AM   #16
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I put the descriptions side by side to check the difference and see what you mean. I was surprised that there was only a 1.4 pound difference betwee the two. I didnt realize that they were aluminum now.
This is news to me too.
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Old 04-13-10, 04:52 AM   #17
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despite the weight difference, I guess I would go for the steel frame as I believe it absorbs little shocks much better. and 959 $ seems a fairly good price for such a bike...
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Old 04-13-10, 05:03 AM   #18
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despite the weight difference, I guess I would go for the steel frame as I believe it absorbs little shocks much better. and 959 $ seems a fairly good price for such a bike...
I had a steel Speed D7 (Schwalbe Big Apples) and have now an alloy Vitesse D7. (Schwalbe Marathon) I can faithfully say, that as far as this derriére is concerned, there's no discernible difference between steel and alloy ride quality on these 20" frames. Tyre choice has more impact, methinks.
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Old 04-13-10, 08:13 AM   #19
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I had a steel Speed D7 (Schwalbe Big Apples) and have now an alloy Vitesse D7. (Schwalbe Marathon) I can faithfully say, that as far as this derriére is concerned, there's no discernible difference between steel and alloy ride quality on these 20" frames. Tyre choice has more impact, methinks.
There are other differences, such as the brakes, which were a big problem I've read on these forums and elsewhere on the pre-V.Clamp brakes.

Also, while there may not be a difference in "feel", would the aluminum not be sturdier and less likely to crack/rust?
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Old 04-13-10, 08:29 AM   #20
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There are plenty of cracked alloy frames, and plenty of rusty steel ones. The debate is as old as bicycling. I prefer alloy frames, they tend not to be much lighter but they do resist rust when the paint gets scratched, and I feel, stand up to corrosion well, unless you drop one in the sea.. But both of my Dahon Speed type frames, one alloy, and one steel have been great. Neither has given any problems.
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Old 04-13-10, 09:36 AM   #21
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Not to start an arguemnet but you did mention potholes, I would probably go with the steel frame.
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Old 04-15-10, 04:16 PM   #22
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I am leaning towards a TT, but the Vitesse P18 has caught my eye, as it offers a nice amount of gears (18) and while is 6-7 lbs heavier than the TT, is also about $700 less.

I am seeking an upgrade from my 7-gear Jack, so I'd guess either is a big step up. I road tested the TT a little, but will take it out this weekend for a longer ride to get a better handle on it. First impressions: the brakes are weak compared to the Jack, and the handlebars are a bit annoying - maybe because I am used to the straight ones on the Jack.

Anyone have any thoughts comparing the 2 bikes?

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Old 04-15-10, 09:15 PM   #23
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Checkout the MuP8 it is a little lighter , cheaper and Gaerlan has tricked them out.
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Old 04-15-10, 09:21 PM   #24
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http://www.gaerlan.com/dahon/dahon.htm
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Old 04-15-10, 10:19 PM   #25
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I had a steel Speed D7 (Schwalbe Big Apples) and have now an alloy Vitesse D7.
I think you mean aluminum?
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