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Wheelbuilding once again

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Wheelbuilding once again

Old 10-26-10, 04:15 PM
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Wheelbuilding once again

I'm likely going to rebuild a rear wheel in the next few weeks (for the first time), I'm feeling just about ready but could do with a little more assistance. I'm keeping my current SA hub but switching the rim for a Kinetix Pro (an older version that happens to be 28H).

The current spoke pattern is this:

https://s.wiggle.co.uk/images/dahon%20dhka052.jpg

What's the name of that type of lacing, is it a "double-cross" / "two-cross"?

Is that optimal for a self-build or can I save a bit of weight?
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Old 10-26-10, 08:02 PM
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To figure out the cross pattern follow a single spoke from the rim to the hub and count how many times it touches another spoke. To distinguish between spokes which are touching and spokes which are in the background in a picture it's helpful to remember that at the rim spokes alternate between left and right sides (for a normal spoke pattern)...so ignore either the even or odd spokes.

So the bike in that pic has a 2x pattern in the rear and a 0x pattern in the front. Lower cross numbers are said to save some weight due to having shorter spokes, but in all practicality lacing pattern has no influence on weight worth mentioning.

However, are you sure your Sturmey Archer hub is a 28H hub? I thought they're usually drilled for 36 spokes. Lacing mismatched hubs and rims can be challenging due to the phase difference between left and right side spoke holes (the degree of phase difference depends on the number of spoke holes).
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Old 10-27-10, 05:16 AM
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Yep, definitely 28H. . . hey, you're right that the hub is listed as 36H only on the Sturmey Archer website. I guess they used to make another shell.
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Old 10-27-10, 05:25 AM
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How exact do I need to be with spoke length? Using a calculator I've ended up with the figures 162.6 and 163.1mm. . . so I guess it's safe to go with 163mm for both sides?

The 'centre-to-left' and 'centre-to-right' measurements were done with a caliper and there was room for error as the hub is still built into a rim: how exact do I need to be with those measurements? From what I can see there's room to be a couple of mm out(?).

Last edited by chagzuki; 10-27-10 at 08:15 AM.
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Old 10-27-10, 08:55 AM
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Originally Posted by chagzuki
How exact do I need to be with spoke length? Using a calculator I've ended up with the figures 162.6 and 163.1mm. . . so I guess it's safe to go with 163mm for both sides?

The 'centre-to-left' and 'centre-to-right' measurements were done with a caliper and there was room for error as the hub is still built into a rim: how exact do I need to be with those measurements? From what I can see there's room to be a couple of mm out(?).
Nearest mm is fine. Spoke length only needs to be exact so you don't poke holes in your tubes (if too long) or not have enough threads for the nipples to engage (too short).
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Old 10-27-10, 10:31 AM
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You sound pretty ready to build your wheel. In my experience, there is more art than science once the measurements are correctly made. I find smaller wheels to be easier, because of less spoke rotation. Even spoked motorcycle wheels aren't that bad.

Have fun!
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