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Citizen bikes - any good?

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Citizen bikes - any good?

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Old 06-04-14, 01:53 PM
  #26  
redFlea02
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About the Citizen Bikes

Hi! Thank you so much for you post, it is so great to know that the citizen bike can be squeezed into luggage! That is SO HELPFUL!! I have to travel a lot and find myself renting bikes to get to know the places I'm in so much... I've been looking into getting a folding bike and am a bicycle newbie (it's one thing to know how to ride a bike and another completely different to be able to identify the best brands for parts and what accessories are needed for which activity). With that being said, I was wondering if you'd recommend the Citizen bikes for light off roading? Nothing too major, just regular trails, some hills here and there? I really love the Citizen Miami bike and budget wise it's right up my alley, but would love to know if I buy it will I be able to use it for a long time to come, to go exploring the places I travel to regardless of bike trail conditions?

Thank you SO MUCH!! Have a great day!

Originally Posted by 1nterceptor View Post
When I visited my brother in California; I borrowed one of them(he's got 3 Citizen Tokyo's).
I thought it was ok for the price; I even did some light off roading with it. Fast forward one year later;
Jetblue Air wouldn't let me check-in my Brompton in a cardboard box as my 1st piece of luggage on an
international flight. Instead of spending US$350 on a BW case for my B'ton; I purchased a used Tokyo
on Craigslist. Disassembled and squeezed it in my luggage then flew with that bike to Aruba.
Had a lot of fun.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FR2T...IoDLA&index=12

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUUC...IoDLA&index=22
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Old 06-04-14, 02:04 PM
  #27  
1nterceptor
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Citizen bikes will take pretty wide tires; I don't know if that will
be enough for the type of off roading you plan on doing. In my
videos; I was going over sandy conditions and they were ok.

2013 Citizen Tokyo in a suitcase by 1nterceptor, on Flickr
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Old 06-05-14, 02:42 PM
  #28  
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for those Tokyo owners, would the Schwalbe Big Apple tires fit? If not what about Greenspeed Scorchers? I have a set of Scorchers on my Tikit but thinking of getting my wife a Tokyo as a basic folder for light occasional riding, improving the ride comfort would likely the the only mod needed.
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Old 02-01-15, 02:48 PM
  #29  
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I'm not a frequenter of the forums so I am seeing this a little late, but here's my two cents.
I bought a Tokyo last spring and I've ridden it three times. It is very fun for a leisurely ride around town or on bike paths. I do not recommend it as a commuter bike. The gearing is MUCH too low. 23"-46" if I remember correctly. The highest gear could be used to climb slight hills if you are a strong cyclist. This bike had me pedaling like mad just to go forward at a slow pace. You will risk being late to work. I also didn't care for the fold. It takes a lot of muscle to fold and unfold. It does seem sturdy and is very pretty. The 20" wheeled citizen bikes have higher gear inches (you can ride faster) and may be worth the extra expense. I will be selling my tokyo and looking for a low end dahon. Dahon vybe c7a is selling for $370 with free shipping on Amazon.

Originally Posted by ShermCraig View Post
So, here we are about 3 years later - I'd like to see if any of the feelings expressed 3 years ago have changed. Anyone chime in? I'm considering a Citizen Bike and I live in Manhattan. I'll likely use it for commuting to work (not far) and just bopping around the city. I understand there have been improvements, but I imagine the other brands have also improved. So, what say you all? Thanks!!
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Old 02-01-15, 03:28 PM
  #30  
fietsbob 
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Rare is a Folding Bike made in more than one size only.
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Old 05-16-15, 05:56 AM
  #31  
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I've had my Tokyo for over a year and rode somewhere between 500-1000 miles in sunny weather only. Got a rear flat last week so I upgraded the tires yesterday to 100 psi (they are slightly skinnier than the stock 45 psi tires) and will ride on them today for the first time. 7-speed 11-28t freewheels are impossible to find. I'd sell an organ for one. I have an 11-28t cassette but have been thinking about selling it and sticking with the stock 14t freewheel or maybe upgrading to the 13t until I find one of the 11-28t unicorns on ebay.
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Old 05-31-15, 03:38 PM
  #32  
edwong3
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NYCE Wheels sells a 7 speed 11-30 freewheel.

7-speed bicycle freewheel, 11-30

Don't know the brand name though.
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Old 01-04-16, 06:07 PM
  #33  
Auclan
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Switching out the freewheel and/or chainring can make the Citizen bikes faster: https://bikefoldorg.wordpress.com
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Old 03-22-16, 08:23 AM
  #34  
TimWhatley
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Hi all. Anyone familiar with the Citizen Seoul? Plenty of Citizen reviews out there, but feedback on this model is scarce. SEOUL Citizen Bike 20" 6-speed Folding Bike with Alloy Frame

Cheers!
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Old 04-30-16, 01:03 AM
  #35  
Heller Highland
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You're in luck! I just got my Seoul in the mail last week, and just finished cleaning all the road salt off of it after today/tonight's rain. I use it on my rounds as a bike messenger, and so far, can't complain much. The Seoul's about as fast as non-folding bikes I've seen on the streets - I've kept pace with some, and easily passed others, and folding it's been a cinch. You just pull back the quick release latch on the stem, pull it up a notch, and the bike folds right in half.
Rolling it while folded took a minute to get used to, but I usually fold the bike, leave the handlebars and seatpost up, and push it like a wheelchair, and the Seoul rolls smoothly.
I asked the people at Citizen whether the Seoul or the Miami would be better for me, and got this response:

"That would be some heavy riding for any bike. We'd recommend the SEOUL over the MIAMI as the gearing is a bit zippier. The bike can be rolled when folded with some practice. With proper maintenance, you should be able to get great performance and fine life out of the bike. The SEOUL is geared for practical city riding. Slight inclines and hills should be fine. Any steep incline would be more of a challenge. As for stashing on transit, with use you'll develop a routine to fold and store the bike to avoid any common damage."
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Old 05-01-16, 07:25 AM
  #36  
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Thanks for the response, Heller Highland. Glad you're digging the Seoul. I ended up with a Nova and it's perfect for what I was looking for, but it's good to know the Seoul has fans too.
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Old 05-01-16, 05:34 PM
  #37  
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I can't believe I'm seeing such recent posts so in line with my questions! I'm deciding between Citizen Miami and Seoul or Downtube Nova right now. Can I ask what swayed you guys one way or another? I'm 5'3" and looking for a Metro friendly commuter bike.
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Old 05-01-16, 06:30 PM
  #38  
DVC45
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Originally Posted by Rials View Post
I can't believe I'm seeing such recent posts so in line with my questions! I'm deciding between Citizen Miami and Seoul or Downtube Nova right now. Can I ask what swayed you guys one way or another? I'm 5'3" and looking for a Metro friendly commuter bike.


I like my Nova. It can be rolled when folded and a bit lighter than your other choices.
I've owned it for four years now and it is still my pack and go bike of choice.
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Old 05-09-16, 06:30 AM
  #39  
TimWhatley
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Originally Posted by Rials View Post
I can't believe I'm seeing such recent posts so in line with my questions! I'm deciding between Citizen Miami and Seoul or Downtube Nova right now. Can I ask what swayed you guys one way or another? I'm 5'3" and looking for a Metro friendly commuter bike.
I was swayed by the history of positive reviews on the Nova. I've had mine for a month or so and so far I've been happy with it.
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Old 05-09-16, 12:16 PM
  #40  
Heller Highland
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Originally Posted by Rials View Post
I can't believe I'm seeing such recent posts so in line with my questions! I'm deciding between Citizen Miami and Seoul or Downtube Nova right now. Can I ask what swayed you guys one way or another? I'm 5'3" and looking for a Metro friendly commuter bike.
I work as a messenger (lots of time on the streets, not a lot of pay), and had been on a kick scooter before upgrading to a bike. Both the Seoul and the Miami had a ton of positive reviews, and I liked the Miami from a price standpoint. I asked Citizen the difference between the Seoul and the Miami, and they recommended the Seoul, since it has better gearing for going uphill and the like.
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Old 05-10-16, 10:04 AM
  #41  
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I had the Barcelona but it's heavy as hell. Dahon is the only folding bike you should buy
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Old 05-14-16, 11:55 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by chesky View Post
I had the Barcelona but it's heavy as hell. Dahon is the only folding bike you should buy
With all due respect you bought a classic styled folding bike build from a heavy guage steel. It is going to have a little heft to it. And as any number of the active posters on these forums can attest, there are several cheaper bikes that can be worthwhile. The great thing about bicycles is there are no be-all end-all brands or styles. Everyone has something that works for them and some individuals value some things more than others.

In my case I have a Citizen Tokyo. A slow, heavy, and slightly clunky bike by many peoples standards, but for me I love it. It is perfect for a nice relaxing pace on the local MUP for <50 mile day rides. It meets my limited need, it was cheap, and I greatly enjoy riding it. That is all there is to it.

So, I don't see the need for what could potentially pass as elitism when it comes to one's transportation or their hobby. If it is something you like and enjoy that is all that really matters. Which is why I'd stress that one test ride anything they plan on purchasing. If it feels wrong, it feels wrong. If it feels good but might need a few tweaks it is just that. Reviews are one thing, experience is another.

Last edited by FoldMeSideways; 05-14-16 at 01:41 PM. Reason: editing spelling and some clarification
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Old 10-15-16, 03:34 PM
  #43  
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Gotham 24-7

Citizens Gotham 24-7 review. I love it for exactly what I bought it for. Toss in the back of the car and ride whenever and where ever I want. I have found it to be a nice ride. My usual cruising speed is 11.5 on my other bikes. This little bike same average. I would have no problem taking it on a 50 mile ride to be honest and hope to soon. I can fold or unfold in less than 30 seconds. Honestly I can not name one fault that this bike has.
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Old 01-01-17, 07:06 PM
  #44  
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I bought a used Citizen Tokyo for less than $100.. to replace my Bike Friday Tikit.

Hope to get some modification to the stem to allow more extension to the reach of handlebars.



My commute includes a 1.5 mile bike ride, subway ride, 1/2 mi. bike ride, another subway ride, then 1 mile bike ride to office... that's one way.
I need a folding bike that is small enough to fit through NYC subway turnstile.
For my purpose, Citizen Tokyo is serving me pretty well, I like its small size, the gearing of the bike is not the quickest, but I've got other bikes that are meant to be ridden at faster paces.
The Tokyo seems to be durable, walking, sometimes riding it up and down steps of subways, NYC potholes, falling onto its side.. so far 1 month of ownership.. it's holding up pretty well.
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Old 01-02-17, 09:11 AM
  #45  
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I bought two Citizen Tokyo's, flipped the stems, and put on smaller cranksets and gave them to my kids (9 and 7). They really like them and now have bikes with gears.

http://www.bikeforums.net/folding-bi...-year-old.html
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Old 01-02-17, 03:39 PM
  #46  
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I own both a Brompton and a Citizen Miami,so I have something at both ends of the price spectrum.The citizen is a great machine for the price and have put many miles on it the three years I have had it.If the extra weight is a problem you can lighten it by removing the fenders and the rear rack by almost three lbs.You can buy plastic fenders if you need them and pick up a super light weight rack that attaches to the seat post for about $25.
The brompton speaks for it'self but I wouldn't give up on the citizen and have no plans on getting rid of it.
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Old 01-02-17, 05:06 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by cat0020 View Post
I bought a used Citizen Tokyo for less than $100.. to replace my Bike Friday Tikit.

Hope to get some modification to the stem to allow more extension to the reach of handlebars.



My commute includes a 1.5 mile bike ride, subway ride, 1/2 mi. bike ride, another subway ride, then 1 mile bike ride to office... that's one way.
I need a folding bike that is small enough to fit through NYC subway turnstile.
For my purpose, Citizen Tokyo is serving me pretty well, I like its small size, the gearing of the bike is not the quickest, but I've got other bikes that are meant to be ridden at faster paces.
The Tokyo seems to be durable, walking, sometimes riding it up and down steps of subways, NYC potholes, falling onto its side.. so far 1 month of ownership.. it's holding up pretty well.
That is actually a very cute little bike. Stripped down like that what does it weigh? Would it be possible to put a 52 chain ring and a 11-28 rear cluster, or even just a 11 tooth freewheel.
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Old 01-03-17, 07:02 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by 12boy View Post
That is actually a very cute little bike. Stripped down like that what does it weigh? Would it be possible to put a 52 chain ring and a 11-28 rear cluster, or even just a 11 tooth freewheel.
For my commute riding, I don't see the need to have 52t chainring, nor 28t rear cog.

16" small wheels are not mean to spin at 25+mph for extended amount of time, nor do they need 28T rear cog to climb up steep hills.

I ditched the heavy OEM crankset b/b for Titanium B/B and a set of old Sugino low profile cranks, shaved about 2 lb. off the bike. Now it probably weighs in at 18 lb.
Running 46T chainring and 12/24 Sachs 7-speed freewheel from my old road bike, feel like I never need to use the 24t rear cog to climb any of my commuting hills, maybe a 23T is low enough for the steepest grade I encounter.

46/12 combo allows me to spin easily at 17-18 mph.. something that I don't think I would sustain much because I try to stay non-sweaty by the time I get to my office... even thought there is a shower available.

I cut off the OEM stem clamp and used some homemade shim to install a stem to extend my reach on the bike. Now I'm much more comfortable cruising on the bike.



Probably would change out the seatpost next, to get rid of the steel seat clamp... OEM seat is also quite heavy... but comfortable.

Last edited by cat0020; 01-03-17 at 07:06 PM.
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Old 01-05-17, 06:27 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by cat0020 View Post
For my commute riding, I don't see the need to have 52t chainring, nor 28t rear cog.

16" small wheels are not mean to spin at 25+mph for extended amount of time, nor do they need 28T rear cog to climb up steep hills.

I ditched the heavy OEM crankset b/b for Titanium B/B and a set of old Sugino low profile cranks, shaved about 2 lb. off the bike. Now it probably weighs in at 18 lb.
Running 46T chainring and 12/24 Sachs 7-speed freewheel from my old road bike, feel like I never need to use the 24t rear cog to climb any of my commuting hills, maybe a 23T is low enough for the steepest grade I encounter.

46/12 combo allows me to spin easily at 17-18 mph.. something that I don't think I would sustain much because I try to stay non-sweaty by the time I get to my office... even thought there is a shower available.

I cut off the OEM stem clamp and used some homemade shim to install a stem to extend my reach on the bike. Now I'm much more comfortable cruising on the bike.



Probably would change out the seatpost next, to get rid of the steel seat clamp... OEM seat is also quite heavy... but comfortable.

Not to be rude, but is it possible to get the tokyo to about 18lbs? I think the changing saddle and the seatpost would shed you off some weight too. What stem do you have with that handlebar because it looks extended (which I like, I'm kinda cramped a little bit on my dahon speed) Good find btw for about or a little less than a 100usd, I think Citizen is one of the best brands if you're on a tight budget. Thinking of getting a Tokyo myself so i can bring it overseas since the dahon 20inchers are a little bit harder to fit on a suitcase
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Old 01-06-17, 07:20 AM
  #50  
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If a brompton penta clip would fit on the seatpost it would probably shed some weight, as it is aluminum. The wheels have steel hubs which add a bit, too. Are those wheels 349? Still, all in all it is very nice.
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