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Swift folders

Old 02-23-09, 03:37 PM
  #1901  
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Originally Posted by rickybails
Yes for 451 wheels you need calipers - but very long reach ones. Last time I looked there was only one caliper on the market with the right reach - the Tektro R456 I think they are called (but look back in this thread to confirm).
Has anyone considered Paul Components v-brakes? The motoBMX if my memory is correct.
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Old 02-23-09, 06:24 PM
  #1902  
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But if bigger wheels are more efficient...how about making a wheel like with a 700 cm or 27 or 28 inch diameter? Hey, there's an idea!
Hey~ great idea! (just what was I think’n!..)
I should just dodge the 451’s, and go straight to a set of 700’s! May not be the easiest install, but “Where there’s a will, there’s a way!” Heck, just can the Swift all together! (big applaud, and the crowd roars..)

Oh, wait a sec. – maybe I actually was think’n…I happen to prefer smaller wheels, and though the 406 or 451 may still have a bit more rolling resistance, compared to the 700 big-bro’s, they still suit my ‘personal’ performance & convenience needs.

Who know’s maybe its just a part of my cycling evolution, and in a couple,few years, I’ll have grown into a full size bike with ISO900 rims! – wait, not think’n again! They don’t even make that size, do they? Well hey, there’s another GREAT idea! Someone out there , get to build’n!

Horses for courses..
Rant out – K.
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Old 02-23-09, 10:30 PM
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I've got some more good advanced ideas for the bi-cycle of the future, too. I think I've figured out a way to make a bike without complicated noisy heavy gears or dirty chains. What you do is make the front wheel very large and the pedals can attach directly to it, and then all you'll need is a tiny rear wheel just to keep the thing upright. It might look something like this:



And, for the more distant future, I have an idea for a bike that might even dispense with pedals, too!



I also have some futuristic ideas for tires that would be totally immune to flats and blowouts!
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Old 02-23-09, 10:42 PM
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Right on! Now~ I think we're onto somethiing!

reverse technology, noone ever expected it!
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Old 02-24-09, 08:28 PM
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Yup, and I'm working out a way to build a wheel-less bike that will run on irregular terrain. What you do is put logs underneath it, and then as you you pass over the logs you have your assistants take them and put them in front of you again.
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Old 02-24-09, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by werewolf
Yup, and I'm working out a way to build a wheel-less bike that will run on irregular terrain. What you do is put logs underneath it, and then as you you pass over the logs you have your assistants take them and put them in front of you again.
sounds like highly advanced Egyptian Pyramid engineering!
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Old 02-25-09, 01:03 AM
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Originally Posted by invisiblehand
Has anyone considered Paul Components v-brakes? The motoBMX if my memory is correct.
If they are meant for BMX bikes then they would be shorter than standard V-brakes, moving them in the wrong direction. As it's set up now, Kaito probably has some "mushy" brakes. I don't see any travel agents in conjunction with the TT brake levers. But hey, it's only temporary.
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Old 02-25-09, 03:41 AM
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Dunno if its due to the LBS's mechanic's magic, or just that the TT levers & V's actually do work, but I've had no issues what so ever with braking.
I regularly hit 50~55km's/hr on the downhills on my commute, and have been able to stop very effectively with one-finger pull, and w/only a fraction of the lever's pull-distance.

Yeah, it is a temp. set up though. I'm waiting on my R556's which should be here soon, but the 451's aren't gonna be available till Mar, prob Apr!

Also, still wait'n & hurt'n for my 55/44t front rings! The stock 53t w/ 12/27cass. has comfort since there's very little gap, but limited range...Esp. on my loooong climb on my ride home...
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Old 02-25-09, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by sqynt
If they are meant for BMX bikes then they would be shorter than standard V-brakes, moving them in the wrong direction. As it's set up now, Kaito probably has some "mushy" brakes. I don't see any travel agents in conjunction with the TT brake levers. But hey, it's only temporary.
Just judging from the description, they gave them the BMX label since riders would switch from 406 to 451 wheels. They apparently also work for switching from 26" to 700c. If you take a look at them, you will see that they allow a lot of height adjustment.
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Old 03-04-09, 02:46 AM
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Originally Posted by invisiblehand
Just judging from the description, they gave them the BMX label since riders would switch from 406 to 451 wheels. They apparently also work for switching from 26" to 700c. If you take a look at them, you will see that they allow a lot of height adjustment.
I should have done my homework first. The name mislead me. At $125 per wheel though, I think I'll buy a Flying Pidgeon. Or two.

TT levers are definitely short pull levers. If they work well enough for you, that probably just means your LBS did a really good job at setting up the brakes.
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Old 03-04-09, 06:30 AM
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Well..Still wait'n on the big 55t outer front ring, but I had the new crank set & 44t inner ring installed last night at the LBS. For now, my set up is 53t-44t front rings, so I've had a chance to test out the front derailer for my commute today..

When the mech. was setting it up & tuning it, he warned me that the chain drops if the bike's in a really high gear & I try to change rings in the front, but that its fine for middle & low gear shifting. So, on my ride to work, I shifted the front 2,3 times, no prob's, I'm stoked. Then, carelessness & curiosity lead me to try'n see if I could shift from my front big ring, to my the 44t front, while in 9th gear. - Didn't work..Chain dropped, and I sputtered out... ~ shoulda listened to what the mech. advised!

Next - my ride home, where I REALLY need to shift & use both rings. So I shifted plenty of times from 53t to 44t while in 1~6,7th gear - nice, smooth & precise. Till - I tried shifting from the 44t to the 53t while in 7th, and again..the dreaded drop...I sputtered out again, and got my second helping of greasy-fingers for the day..

Dunno if I've still not developed the ' fine art of shifting', or the FD needs more tuning, or perhaps the Swift just doesn't want a FD fitted on it..We'll see.. Still only one day with the set-up, and I'm probably pushing it a bit too much. When shifting between front rings in any of the lowest gears, up to 7th or so, there were no issues at all, so I'll have to use the FD within its sweet-spot - something I can adjust to & live with.

Once the final 55t outer ring arrives & gets installed, I'll post a couple pics & how the set-up's work'n.
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Old 03-09-09, 10:00 AM
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Have you tried working on with the chainline?
I have mine set up with a single in the front and a 9 speed in the rear. My goal was to center the front chainring right over the 5th rear cog. I had to change to a different bottom bracket to acheive this. You may want to bias the crank more toward the outer chainring. This can be accomplished with spacers or a wider bottom bracket.

For those of you running a single front chainring, the best way to keep from dropping the chain (besides a chain guard) is to run a chainring designed to be single as opposed to running a chainring that is part of a multiple set-up (which are desined to "drop" easier when shifting). Because the single fronts do not have to cope with shifting, the teeth are quite a bit taller which keeps the chain on the teeth. I'm currently running a track chainring that had to be modified for a 3\32" shifting type chain. Shimano's track crank has chainrings for both 1/8" and 3/32" chain.
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Old 03-09-09, 11:10 AM
  #1913  
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Originally Posted by Kaito
Dunno if I've still not developed the ' fine art of shifting', or the FD needs more tuning, or perhaps the Swift just doesn't want a FD fitted on it..We'll see.. Still only one day with the set-up, and I'm probably pushing it a bit too much. When shifting between front rings in any of the lowest gears, up to 7th or so, there were no issues at all, so I'll have to use the FD within its sweet-spot - something I can adjust to & live with.
As the other poster mentioned, chainline might be an issue. Particularly if the rear hub has MTB spacing and you are using a road crank.

My guess is that the problem is a mismatch between the optimal size chainrings and jump for the front derailer and the chainrings you selected. So what you are experiencing is one of the reasons for using a Capreo hub/cassette with standard chainring combination.
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Old 03-09-09, 07:25 PM
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Have you tried working on with the chainline?
I have mine set up with a single in the front and a 9 speed in the rear. My goal was to center the front chainring right over the 5th rear cog. I had to change to a different bottom bracket to acheive this. You may want to bias the crank more toward the outer chainring. This can be accomplished with spacers or a wider bottom bracket.
Thanks for the tips. I did some reading over at Sheldon Brown's site on chainline too.

When I had my crank set & front rings changed, the BB was changed out at the same time. The BB came with the set, a FSA team issue, so I'm assuming the BB/chainring measurements are appropriately aligned for a double ringed front.
I've logged a few more rides ,& with more conservative shifting, haven't had a drop again. (knock on wood)

I'll be taking the bike on a 70km group ride this weekend, so its should be a good test. If its acts up, I'll definitely be fine tuning the chainline more.

My guess is that the problem is a mismatch between the optimal size chainrings and jump for the front derailer and the chainrings you selected. So what you are experiencing is one of the reasons for using a Capreo hub/cassette with standard chainring combination.
I've had this in mind too, if the front double set up doesn't settle..
Still waiting on my outer ring (55t) so the project isn't complete just yet.

Thanks for sharing your advice & opinions!
Rgds,
K.
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Old 03-09-09, 08:00 PM
  #1915  
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Big post re front derailer setup coming up...
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Old 03-09-09, 09:15 PM
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1. Set height: Height is critical. Try to get the front part of the cage (the toe) about 2mm above the teeth, or as close as possible, when in the large ring position. Make sure the back of the cage won't snag any teeth.

2. Set angle: With the chain on the smallest sprocket at the back and large chainwheel, set the part of the cage which would rub the chain if set incorrectly, parallel with the chain. This means when correctly set up, the cage is not perfectly parallel to the chainwheel, but is parallel to the chain.

3. Set limit screws: Set the screws such that for the 2 positions, the cage middle lines up with each chain wheel. This is an approximate aqdjustment; more accuracy comes later.

4. Make sure the cable goes through the derailer clamp screw correctly; this may not be obvious, so remove the clamp screw and look for the cable groove. There may also be a little tooth over which the cable must go. Attach the cable and adjust it so it is just slack when in the small ring position.

5. Adjust the H screw so the outer cage plate stops about 1mm past the outer chain ring when the shifter is engaged. Hopefully you don't have any chainring wobble.

6. Adjust the L screw so that the inner cage plate stops about 1mm past the inner chain ring when the shifter relaxes the cable.

7. Shifting should now be perfect while pedalling fast. If shifting to the H ring is hesitant, the front part if the inner plate of the cage may need to be bent slightly towards the H ring to ensure the chain is pushed onto it properly. Don't fiddle with the H screw - that leads to chain drop.

You should be able to shift the the H ring with no chain drop from any sprocket except the largest in the back, at any speed. Shifting must be robust and error free. Don't be tempted to fiddle with the cage adjustment once it has been set up correctly.

Trouble-shooting:
Hesitant shifting to H ring: height too large, H screw too tight (only if rubbing when chain in H ring!), cage inner plate front needs toeing outwards
Chain drop to outside: H screw too loose, cage back end rotated too far in.

See also https://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=75
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Old 03-10-09, 11:24 AM
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This is the current version of my Swift - and it may stay this way! Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres may not be the lightest or fastest but they do work well at preventing punctures. I have noticed a slight extra effort is required to pedal since fitting the tyres but it is nothing to get excited about.



Power Grips; why didn't I try them before! I have used various pedals on my bicycles and cannot get to grips with the SPD type. No matter what make of pedal or shoe combination I use, my feet hurt after a short while. I went back to using toe clips and straps and they were good but were a tight fit when wearing winter shoes. The Power Grips are great; so simple but they work a treat. Easy to get in and out of and they do not cramp my shoes. I can use any shoe to ride and my feet are held safely on the pedals.



The handlebar stem is a very upright one which raises the 'bars to just above seat height. I know that the accepted wisdom states that the bars should be just below saddle height but the arrangement works for me. Note the small and very cheap video camera clamped to the stem riser. I bought it some time ago and it records on an SD card. It's very light, uses normal batteries and although not HD or Wide Screen, provides an interesting record of a ride. I really like the Swift.
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Old 03-11-09, 01:14 AM
  #1918  
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1. Set height: Height is critical. Try to get the front part of the cage (the toe) about 2mm above the teeth, or as close as possible, when in the large ring position. Make sure the back of the cage won't snag any teeth.

2. Set angle: With the chain on the smallest sprocket at the back and large chainwheel, set the part of the cage which would rub the chain if set incorrectly, parallel with the chain. This means when correctly set up, the cage is not perfectly parallel to the chainwheel, but is parallel to the chain.

3. Set limit screws: Set the screws such that for the 2 positions, the cage middle lines up with each chain wheel. This is an approximate aqdjustment; more accuracy comes later.

4. Make sure the cable goes through the derailer clamp screw correctly; this may not be obvious, so remove the clamp screw and look for the cable groove. There may also be a little tooth over which the cable must go. Attach the cable and adjust it so it is just slack when in the small ring position.

5. Adjust the H screw so the outer cage plate stops about 1mm past the outer chain ring when the shifter is engaged. Hopefully you don't have any chainring wobble.

6. Adjust the L screw so that the inner cage plate stops about 1mm past the inner chain ring when the shifter relaxes the cable.

7. Shifting should now be perfect while pedalling fast. If shifting to the H ring is hesitant, the front part if the inner plate of the cage may need to be bent slightly towards the H ring to ensure the chain is pushed onto it properly. Don't fiddle with the H screw - that leads to chain drop.

You should be able to shift the the H ring with no chain drop from any sprocket except the largest in the back, at any speed. Shifting must be robust and error free. Don't be tempted to fiddle with the cage adjustment once it has been set up correctly.

Trouble-shooting:
Hesitant shifting to H ring: height too large, H screw too tight (only if rubbing when chain in H ring!), cage inner plate front needs toeing outwards
Chain drop to outside: H screw too loose, cage back end rotated too far in.
Thanks so much for the very useful & detailed info Jur-san!
I took a look at the FD alighnment & indeed, its off...Infact the chain's rubbing on the FD, on the side towards the BB. It's also not perfectly parallel to the chain & is pointing outwards..
No wonder I had two more chain-drops today!
Will be making the needed adjustments from now.

Thanks for helping me keep my chain in good behavior!
Will post results.
K.
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Old 03-11-09, 04:52 AM
  #1919  
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Originally Posted by Paul Braithwait


This is the current version of my Swift - and it may stay this way!
I see you got hold of clip-on mudguards. I lengthened the back one because it is too short to prevent a wet back.
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Old 03-11-09, 02:38 PM
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I had a rummage around in my shed and found the mudguards under a pile of other bits and bobs. They are both front wheel guards (not sure how I came to have two fronts!). Haven't had the chance to try them in the real wet but the saddle bag deflects a lot of spray so between it and the guard I should be OK.
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Old 03-11-09, 02:55 PM
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I hated Powergrips when I tried them on a different bike. Don't they flop around underneath every time you take your foot off the pedal?
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Old 03-11-09, 03:19 PM
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No, not at all, they are the simplest and most comfortable foot retention system (now there's a posh title!) I have used. The straps are new - so relatively stiff - which may help them keep their shape for a while. When my feet are not in them the straps tend to sit against the cranks which keep them upright - as in the photo. Once I slip my dainty size 10 (UK size) feet into the Power Grips they clear the cranks and don't rub at all.
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Old 03-11-09, 10:08 PM
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I've been modding my Swift the last couple weeks.
Been too busy with tests to post pics, but I'll try to on Friday.

I've slathered most surfaces with 3M retroflective film (brightbike), installed drops (old Sakae randoneurs from the bike kitchen), and long pull brakes (tektros. The Swift feels so much faster now!

I just need a single bar end shifter. Any one have an old Suntour that I can buy?
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Old 03-14-09, 01:46 AM
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Originally Posted by mlau
I just need a single bar end shifter. Any one have an old Suntour that I can buy?
Until you find one, use an old friction thumbshifter and mount it on the inside of your drops, just below where the brake lever clamps. This will put your thumbs in the right position to shift when riding on the hoods. The Bike Kitchen should have plenty of those sitting around, assuming that everything is unpacked after the move.
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Old 03-16-09, 08:56 PM
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Front derailer update -
Made the adjustments, as per Jur's very helpful reccomondations.
- Adjusted the angle, and realligned so its perfectly parallel with rings.
- Adjusted height to sit just over the big ring.
- Adjusted the cable tension. It was too tight.

This was the first time the FD was adjusted since installation. I'm pretty sure the cable stretch'n such has settled, and the tuning has worked out all the final kinks. I had a 70km group ride on Sunday, and the FD performed flawlessly with plenty of climbs/decents. Before adjustments, it was starting to drop the chain even in 6,7th gear, going from small to big ring in the front, but now, shifts in anything up to 8th gear are quick'n smooth. It'll still drop if in 9th/10th, but since I won't be using the small ring in anything above 5th, its not an issue at all. Its exactly what I needed, and I'm completely satisfied with the set up.

Still using 53t/44t on the front, as the LBS's having a hard time ordering in the FSA 55t outter ring. (road-not TT) After a couple of weeks with the 53/44, I'm actually getting used to the 53t outter, but again, would like the 55t, and will post pics once the final bit's installed and the gearing's completed.

As for the rear cassette, I wrote previousy that it was a 12-27t. Well, I hadn't picked it, & left it to the LBS mechanic to decide. I double checked with him which cassette he installed and turns out its a Durace 12-25t.. ~ no wonder I was feeling more of a burn in my climbs! I had debated whether I wanted to change it for broader ranged cassette w/a bigger rear sprocket, but after the 70km group ride on Sun., I'm sold on the 12-25. The closeness of each gear really allows me to fine tune my gear selection/cadence with my breathing & output, which inturn just lead to more comfort & more energy to spare. Some of the climbs are still hard with 44t front / 25t rear combo, so I might go with a 42t front inner ring, or 39t, esp. once the 451's are fitted.

We'll see..but the 12-25 cassette's a keeper!
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