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Nothing about Bikes, only wanna talk about Survival.

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Nothing about Bikes, only wanna talk about Survival.

Old 09-14-17, 10:00 PM
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Nothing about Bikes, only wanna talk about Survival.

I teach or conduct Jungle Survival Classes in Malaysia, and found it was rewarding self satisfaction when I can teach people something new. I had fun mostly! That is because, I love practicing survival craft and bush craft and when I teach, it gives me a chance to practice. One can only learn better by teaching.

It was fun explaining to participants the two modes of jungle survival. One being Prepared Survival and the other being Primitive Survival.
The best thing was, a few of the participants are Mountain Bikers. During the breaks or before we knock off to sleep in our tents/hammocks, when we were talking about cycling. I shared my experience on Bike Camping and they soon connected the class or lessons to Bike Camping. It was like a small mini jamboree and we ended up talking about this for a few hours.

Looks like soon, its gonna be a class about Bike Camping...
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Old 09-14-17, 10:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Tokwan View Post
I teach or conduct Jungle Survival Classes in Malaysia, and found it was rewarding self satisfaction when I can teach people something new. I had fun mostly! That is because, I love practicing survival craft and bush craft and when I teach, it gives me a chance to practice. One can only learn better by teaching.

It was fun explaining to participants the two modes of jungle survival. One being Prepared Survival and the other being Primitive Survival.
The best thing was, a few of the participants are Mountain Bikers. During the breaks or before we knock off to sleep in our tents/hammocks, when we were talking about cycling. I shared my experience on Bike Camping and they soon connected the class or lessons to Bike Camping. It was like a small mini jamboree and we ended up talking about this for a few hours.

Looks like soon, its gonna be a class about Bike Camping...
my fav subject im prepared for everything. but i do need a generater powerfull enough to run my fridge
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Old 09-14-17, 11:38 PM
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Originally Posted by windhchaser View Post
my fav subject im prepared for everything. but i do need a generater powerfull enough to run my fridge
you're gonna need a stout rack to haul a genny into the hills... and a trailer for all the fuel.... you strap the fridge to your back, right?
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Old 09-15-17, 04:30 AM
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Originally Posted by windhchaser View Post
my fav subject im prepared for everything. but i do need a generater powerfull enough to run my fridge
Originally Posted by maddog34 View Post
you're gonna need a stout rack to haul a genny into the hills... and a trailer for all the fuel.... you strap the fridge to your back, right?
Many people living off grid use (or used to use) propane to run their fridge.

There are some fridges and freezers with very good insulation that are relatively solar power compatible.
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Old 09-15-17, 06:17 AM
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I've seen bush "refrigerators" insulated with charcoal for several inches - you spray the charcoal with water once in a while to cause evaporation and keep the contents cool. A more basic kind of solar I guess.
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Old 09-15-17, 08:12 AM
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Originally Posted by nondes View Post
I've seen bush "refrigerators" insulated with charcoal for several inches - you spray the charcoal with water once in a while to cause evaporation and keep the contents cool. A more basic kind of solar I guess.
Zero energy evaporative cooling has been used for centuries…..now extensively in the poorer farming rural areas of China, India and Africa. Lots of good research has been done on methods, including charcoal. With wood charcoal you do need active tree planting to lessen environmental degradations and with all a reliable source of water.
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Old 09-15-17, 10:55 AM
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I've been in one jungle; the Yucatan. I don't do hot/humid well. And the bugs! For me, survival training is searching for a decent single malt for less than $30.
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Old 09-15-17, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Wulf View Post
I've been in one jungle; the Yucatan. I don't do hot/humid well. And the bugs! For me, survival training is searching for a decent single malt for less than $30.
So, no survival in Trump Tower?
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Old 09-15-17, 12:20 PM
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I hear Gloria Gaynor is a big prepper.
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Old 09-15-17, 12:59 PM
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Fridge? Propane? What happened to Bike Camping?
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Old 09-15-17, 02:38 PM
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cool info everyone
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Old 09-16-17, 11:32 AM
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Well, whenever I go bike camping, I try to practice whatever I know about Bush crafting and Survival (as in an Equatorial Rain forest, they go together, like a marriage) as much as possible.
However, I hate cutting down trees or damaging them.
What I practice most are the few methods of primitive fire making, water processing and food foraging. I only use whatever food and water I bring (or should it be brought?) as a last resort. I practice laying down traps, but remove them before any animals are caught. My main source of food from the wild would be fish and edible plants/fruits.
I really enjoy doing this.
However my shelter are limited to my Hennessy Asym Deluxe hammock and a tarp.
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Old 09-16-17, 07:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Tokwan View Post
Well, whenever I go bike camping, I try to practice whatever I know about Bush crafting and Survival (as in an Equatorial Rain forest, they go together, like a marriage) as much as possible.
However, I hate cutting down trees or damaging them.
What I practice most are the few methods of primitive fire making, water processing and food foraging. I only use whatever food and water I bring (or should it be brought?) as a last resort. I practice laying down traps, but remove them before any animals are caught. My main source of food from the wild would be fish and edible plants/fruits.
I really enjoy doing this.
However my shelter are limited to my Hennessy Asym Deluxe hammock and a tarp.
For water processing do you carry liquid iodine or purification tablets? Or is there another option that you prefer or would recommend?
Oh, and do you carry/use a bug net with the hammock?
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Old 09-16-17, 09:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Jadesfire View Post
For water processing do you carry liquid iodine or purification tablets? Or is there another option that you prefer or would recommend?
Oh, and do you carry/use a bug net with the hammock?
Hi Jadesfire,
I carry both. Liquid Iodine is part of my first aid kit. It works as a double handle...use it if you got a cut/wound, and also as a water purifier in terms of emergency.
I also carry Aquatab Water Purification tablets.

However I usually practice making my own water filter system using a bamboo, and lining the inside of the bamboo with:-
(From bottom to top)
1. Swap gauze as the bottom most layer.
2. Charcoal from the fire pit.
3. Fine sand
4. Really coarse sand or very small stones.
5. Charcoal
6. Small stones.mixed with coarse sand.
7. Grass.

With this system, I am sure to get clear water after 3 filtering maximum.

However, I have a Sawyer Mini Water Filter in my pack's pocket. I only use them to filter.

https://sawyer.com/products/sawyer-mini-filter/

All filtered water in South East Asia, needs to be boiled and kept at a rolling boil for 10 minutes. This is to remove bacteria, germs and virus cells. Bacteria can be filtered with a 0.1 Macron Filter as the smallest know is about 0.2 Macron, however virus cells can be as small as 0.004 Macron. So this means that no water filter system is able to filter them. Boiling is the only way.

Water from water sources such as rivers, streams, waterfalls that needs no filtering must be boiled and at kept a rolling boil for 3 minutes.

Water immediately from springs and plants which are not exposed to the open, can be consumed without any processing.

I usually use my favorite hammock, being the Hennessy A Sym Deluxe, with mosquito netting and a tarp. This is the bottom entry model, for 3 season.

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/05...g?v=1494879463

A SNUGPAk All Weather Shelter Tarp is also brought as a spare for bad weather.

http://www.snugpak.com/outdoor/all-weather-shelter

Last edited by Tokwan; 09-16-17 at 09:36 PM.
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Old 09-16-17, 10:07 PM
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There's survival to survive say a week to several weeks and then there's the lifestyle. The former can be reduced to shelter, fire starting, water purification, food. The first 3 things (plus a few discretionary items) can fit in a modest size stainless steel. Food is a tricky thing but savvy locale knowledge can solve some food needs. Seasons play into this. I've several SS containers. With some travel exceptions (air) one container is always near me. The latter (long term survival) is brutal. Some of us approach that on severe long weeks outdoor adventures. Bike camping for months on end is still luxury by a homeless/transients viewpoint. I've remote camped alone without another human in sight for weeks on end. The psychological changes you face, go through, are unexpected.
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Old 09-16-17, 10:19 PM
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Thanks Jseis for your sharing. However, in my class, we teach to use only a knife and a parang.
What we teach.
1. Primitive shelter from leaves and branches, on tree shelter, shelter in swampy areas, and identifying natural shelters. Raised bed is compulsory.
2. Making fire using hand drill, bow drill, bamboo saw, rattan saw, sun and flints (Please note there are other methods too), but we are talking bout primitive methods.
3. Water processing using natural resources. How to identify possible water points, where to get water, plants that you can get water etc.
4. Edible plants, laying of traps, etc.
5. Cooking using natural resources such as bamboo, leaves and clay.
6. Food processing.
7. Navigation without maps and compasses.
8. Make your own cordage.

We also train the participants to be comfortable alone in the equatorial forest.
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Old 09-16-17, 10:21 PM
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I also hold bush crafting clinics from time to time and encourage them to master bush crafting.
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